(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Children's Library | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "Annual report of the Metropolitan Water and Sewerage Board"

iTROPfi 



■■■.■■.■■:■■■ • 






-■':'.- ; vi \ 



Wni ; K 



DECEMBER 31. 1Q ; ' 



rG" 



,N» l,45\.,.33 




Given By 



^ 



*Ify<\.S.$., SecV. «^ Vm Vi>>»>(R0^We^ ^ 



* 



; 



I yrf+jKS 



Public Document 



No. 57 



SIXTEENTH ANNUAL REPOKT 



OF THE 



METROPOLITAN WATER AND 
SEWERAGE BOARD. 



For the Year 1916. 




% , :,•;.. 









BOSTON: 

WRIGHT & POTTER PRINTING CO., STATE PRINTERS, 

32 DERNE STREET. 

1917. 



bi^n. & 



% 



.WEALTH 

Publication of this Document 

approved by the 
Supervisor of Administration. 



* ' • 1*1 



CONTENTS. 



PAGE 

I. Organization and Administration, .......... 1 

Board, Officers and Employees, . . . . . . . . .1 

II. Metropolitan Water District, . . . ... . . . . . .3 

III. Metropolitan Water Works — Construction, ........ 3 

IV. Water Works — Maintenance, ........... 5 * 

(1) Storage Reservoirs, . . . . . . . . . . 5 

(2) Aqueducts, ............. 6 

(3) Pumping Stations, ............. 6 

(3) Protection of Water Supply, .......... 7 

(5) Clinton Sewerage Works, .......... 8 

(6) Forestry, ....'. 9 

(7) Wachusett Power Plant 10 

(8) Sudbury Power Plant, 10 

(9) Rainfall and Water Supply, . . . . . . . . 10 

(10) Water Consumption, . . . . . . . . . . .11 

V. Waterworks — Financial Statement, . . . . . . . . .11 

(1) Water Loans — Receipts and Payments, ........ 12 

(2) Total Water Debt, December 31, 1916, 12 

(3) Metropolitan Water Loan and Sinking Fund, ....... 13 

(4) Water Assessment, 1916, 13 

(5) Supplying Water to Cities and Towns outside of District and to Water Companies, 14 

(6) Expenditures for the Different Works, . . . . . . . .15 

(7) Detailed Financial Statement under Metropolitan Water Act, . . . .17 

(c) Expenditures and Disbursements, . . . . . . . .17 

(&) Receipts 22 

(c) Assets, ............ 23 

(<2) Liabilities, . . . . . . . . . . .23 

VI. Metropolitan Sewerage Works, . . . . . . . . 24 

(1) North Metropolitan Sewerage System — Construction, ..... 25 

(2) North Metropolitan Sewerage System — Maintenance, ..... 25 

Sewers and Pumping Stations, ......... 25 

(3) South Metropolitan Sewerage System — Construction, ..... 26 

(4) South Metropolitan Sewerage System — Maintenance, . . . . .28 

Sewers and Pumping Stations, ......... 28 

VII. Sewerage Works — Financial Statement, . . ' . . . . . . .29 

(1) Metropolitan Sewerage Loans, Receipts and Payments, . . . - . .29 

North Metropolitan System, ......... 30 

South Metropolitan System, ......... 30 

(2) Total Sewerage Debt, December 31, 1916, 31 

North Metropolitan System, ......... 31 

South Metropolitan System, . . . . . . . . .31 

(3) North and South Metropolitan Loan and Sinking Funds, December 31, 1916, . 32 

(4) Annual Appropriations, Receipts and Expenditures, ...... 33 

(5) Sewer Assessments, 1916, .......... 33 

(6) Expenditures for the Different Works, . . . . . . . .35 

(7) Detailed Financial Statement, . . . . . . . . .36 

(c) Expenditures and Disbursements, ........ 36 

(6) Receipts, ............ 41 

(c) Assets, ............ 42 

(d) Liabilities, . . . . . . . . . . . .42 

VIII. Recommendations for Legislation, . ... . . . . . . .43 



iv CONTENTS. 

PAGE 

Report of Chief Engineer of Water Works, . . . . . . . . . .47 

Organization, .............. 47 

Construction, .............. 48 

Completion of 60-inch Weston Aqueduct Supply Main, ...... 48 

Improvement of Beaver Dam Brook, ......... 48 

Additional 24-inch Main from Dorchester Lower Mills to Quincy, . . . .49 

Bellevue Reservoir, ............ 49 

Sudbury Power Plant, ............ 50 

Wachusett-Sudbury Transmission Line, ......... 53 

Additional Northern Extra High-service Pipe Line and Pumping Machinery, . . 53 

Southern Extra High-service Pipe Line, ......... 54 

Meters and Connections, ........... 55 

Engineering, ............. 56 

Maintenance, .............. 56 

Rainfall and Yield of Watersheds, .......... 56 

• Storage Reservoirs, . . . . . . . . . . . .57 

Wachusett Reservoir, ........... 57 

Sudbury Reservoir, ........... 60 

Framingham Reservoir No. 3,. . . . . . . . . .61 

Framingham Reservoirs Nos. 1 and 2, Ashland, Hopkinton and Whitehall Reservoirs, 62 

Farm Pond, 63 

Lake Cochituate, . . . . . . . . . . ... 63 

Dudley Pond, . 64 

Aqueducts, .............. 64 

Wachusett Aqueduct, ........... 64 

Sudbury Aqueduct, ........... 65 

Weston Aqueduct, ............ 66 

Cochituate Aqueduct, ........... 67 

Sanitary Inspection of Watersheds, ......... 69 

Wachusett Watershed, ........... 69 

Sudbury Watershed, ........... 72 

Cochituate Watershed, ........... 72 

Protection of the Water Supply, .......... 72 

Filtration and Chlorination, .......... 72 

Improvement of Swamps and Brooks, ... . . . . • .73 

Acquisition of Land, ........... 74 

Clinton Sewage Disposal Works, .......... 74 

Forestry, .............. 77 

Wachusett Department, ........... 77 

Sudbury Department, ........... 79 

Distribution Department, .......... 80 

Hydro-electric Service, ............ 81 

Wachusett Power Station, . . . . . . . . • .81 

Sudbury Power Station, ........... 82 

Distribution Pumping Service, ........•• 84 

Chestnut Hill Pumping Stations, ......... 86 

Spot Pond Pumping Station, .......... 88 

Arlington Pumping Station, .......... 89 

Hyde Park Pumping Station .90 

Distribution Reservoirs, . . . . . . • • • ■ .91 

Weston Reservoir, ........•••• 92 

Chestnut Hill, Fisher Hill and Waban Hill Reservoirs, 92 

Spot Pond, Fells and Bear Hill Reservoirs, ....... 94 

Arlington, Bellevue, Forbes Hill and Mystic Reservoirs, ..... 94 

Mystic Lake, Conduit and Pumping Station and Grounds at Arlington and Hyde 

Park Pumping Stations, ......•••• 95 

Distribution Pipe Lines, ........••• 96 

Pipe Bridges, ............. 97 

Pipe Yards, .........•••• 97 

Meters, Regulating Valves and Recording Pressure Gages, ..... 97 

Breaks and Leaks, ........•••• 98 

Emergency Pipe Line Service, .......••• 98 

Consumption of Water, ........•••• 99 

Installation of Meters on Service Pipes, . . . . . • • 192 



CONTENTS. v 

Report of Chief Engineer of Water Works — Concluded. page 

Maintenance — Concluded. 

Water supplied outside of Metropolitan Water District, ...... 102 

Quality of the Water 103 

Engineering, ............. 103 

Report of Chief Engineer of Sewerage Works, ......... 104 

Organization, .............. 104 

Metropolitan Sewerage Districts, ........... 105 

Areas and Populations, ............ 105 

Metropolitan Sewers, . . . . . . . . . . . . . 106 

Sewers purchased and constructed and their Connections, ...... 106 

Construction, . . . . . . . . ' « . . ... . 109 

North Metropolitan System, . . . . . . . . . . . 109 

Deer Island Outfall Extension, ......... 109 

Section 1, Deer Island Outfall Extension, . . . . . . . .110 

Section 19, Maiden River Siphon, 110 

Removal of Old Maiden River Siphon, . . . . . . . .111 

Extension to Reading, ........... Ill 

South Metropolitan System, . . . . . . . . . . .112 

Wellesley Extension, . . . . . . . . . . .112 

Section 98, Wellesley Extension, . . . . . . . . .112 

Section 99, Wellesley Extension, ......... 113 

Sections 100 and 101, Wellesley Extension, ....... 113 

Section 102, Wellesley Extension, . . . . . . . . .114 

Section 103, Wellesley Extension, . . . . . . . . .114 

Section 104, Wellesley Extension, ......... 115 

Maintenance, .............. 115 

Scope of Work and Force employed, . . . . . . . . .115 

Deer Island Pumping Station, . . . . . . . .' . .116 

East Boston Pumping Station, . . . . . . . . .116 

Ward Street Pumping Station, . . . . ... . . . 116 

Nut Island Screen-house, . . . . . . . . . .117 

Gasoline in Public Sewers, . . . . . . . . . .117 

Drainage from Tanneries, Gelatine and Glue Works in Winchester, Woburn and 
Stoneham, ............. 119 

Data relating to Areas and Populations contributing Sewage to Metropolitan 
Sewerage System, ........... 121 

North Metropolitan System, ......... 121 

South Metropolitan System, ......... 122 

Whole Metropolitan System 123 

Pumping Stations, 124 

Capacity and Results, . . . . . . . . . . .124 

North Metropolitan System, 124 

Deer Island Pumping Station, ........ 124 

East Boston Pumping Station, ........ 126 

Charlestown Pumping Station, ........ 127 

Alewife Brook Pumping Station, . . . . . . . . 129 

South Metropolitan System, 130 

Ward Street Pumping Station, ........ 130 

Quincy Pumping Station, ......... 132 

Nut Island Screen-house, . . . . . . . . .133 

Quincy Sewage Lifting Station, ........ 133 

Metropolitan Sewerage Outfalls 135 

Material intercepted at the Screens, ......... 136 



Appendix No. 1. — Contracts relating to the Metropolitan Water Works made and pending dur- 
ing the Year 1916 138 

Appendix No. 2. — Tables relating to the Maintenance of the Metropolitan Water Works, . 145 

Table No. 1. — Monthly Rainfall in Inches at Various Places on the Metropolitan Water 

Works in 1916, . 145 

Table No. 2. — Rainfall in Inches at Jefferson, Mass., in 1916 146 



vi CONTENTS. 

Appendix No. 2 — Continued. » page 

Table No. 3. — Rainfall in Inches at Framingham, Mass., in 1916, ..... 147 
Table No. 4. — Rainfall in Inches at Chestnut Hill Reservoir in 1916, .... 148 
Table No. 5. — Rainfall in Inches on the Wachusett Watershed, 1897 to 1916, . . 150 

Table No. 6. — Rainfall in Inches on the Sudbury Watershed, 1875 to 1916, . . .151 

Table No. 7. — Yield of the Wachusett Watershed. in Gallons per Day per Square Mile 

from 1897 to 1916, . 153 

Table No. 8. — Yield of the Sudbury Watershed in Gallons per Day per Square Mile from 

1875 to 1916, 155 

Table No. 9. — Wachusett System. — Statistics of Flow of Water, Storage and Rainfall 

in 1916 159 

Table No. 10. — Sudbury System. — Statistics of Flow of Water, Storage and Rainfall in 

1916 160 

Table No. 11. — Cochituate System. — Statistics of Flow of Water, Storage and Rainfall 

in 1916 161 

Table No. 12. — Elevations of Water Surfaces of Reservoirs above Boston City Base at the 

Beginning of Each Month, ........ 162 

Table No. 13. — Sources from which and Periods during which Water has been drawn for the 

Supply of the Metropolitan Water District, . . . . .163 

Table No. 14. — Average Daily Quantity of Water flowing through Aqueducts in 1916 by 

Months 164 

Table No. 15. — Statement of Operation of Engines Nos. 1 and 2 at Chestnut Hill Pump- 
ing Station No. 1 for the Year 1916, 165 

Table No. 16. — Statement of Operation of Engine No. 3 at Chestnut Hill Pumping Station 

No. 1 for the Year 1916 . . .166 

Table No. 17. — Statement of Operation of Engine No. 4 at Chestnut Hill Pumping Station 

No. 1 and Summary for the Station for the Year 1916, . . . 167 

Table No. 18. — Statement of Operation of Engines Nos r 5, 6 and 7 at Chestnut Hill 

Pumping Station No. 2 for the Year 1916, 168 

Table No. 19. — Statement of Operation of Engine No. 12 at Chestnut Hill Pumping 

Station No. 2 for the Year 1916, 169 

Table No. 20. — Statement of Operation of Engine No. 8 at Spot Pond Pumping Station 

for the Year 1916 170 

Table No. 21. — Statement of Operation of Engine No. 9 at Spot Pond Pumping Station 

for the Year 1916, . v 171 

Table No. 22. — Statement of Operation of Engine Nq. 10 at Arlington Pumping Station 

for the Year 1916 172 

Table No. 23. — Statement of Operation of Engine No. 11 at Arlington Pumping Station 

for the Year 1916 173 

Table No. 24. — Statement of Operation of Engines Nos. 13 and 14 at Hyde Park Pumping 

Station for the Year 1916, 174 

Table No. 25. — (Meter Basis) Average Daily Consumption of Water by Districts in Cities 

and Towns supplied by the Metropolitan Water Works in 1916, . . 175 

Table No. 26. — (Meter Basis) Average Daily Consumption of Water in Cities and Towns 

supplied from Metropolitan Works in 1916, ..... 176 

Table No. 27. — (Pump Basis) Consumption of Water in the Metropolitan Water District, 

as constituted in the Year 1916, and a Small Section of the Town of 

Saugus, from 1893 to 1916 179 

Table No. 28. — Chemical Examinations of Water from the Wachusett Reservoir, Clinton, . 181 
Table No. 29. — Chemical Examinations of Water from the Sudbury Reservoir, . . 182 

Table No. 30. — Chemical Examinations of Water from Spot Pond, Stoneham, . . . 183 
Table No. 31. — Chemical Examinations of Water from Lake Cochituate, . . . 184 

Table No. 32. — Chemical Examinations of Water from a Tap at the State House, Boston, 185 
Table No. 33. — Averages of Examinations of Water from Various Parts of the Metropolitan 

Water Works in 1916 186 

Table No. 34. — Chemical Examinations of Water from a Faucet in Boston, from 1892 to 

1916 187 

Table No. 35. — Microscopic Organisms in Water from Various Parts of the Metropolitan 

Water Works, from 1898 to 1916, inclusive 188 

Table No. 36. — Number of Bacteria per Cubic Centimeter in Water from Various Parts of 

the Metropolitan Water Works, from 1898 to 1916, inclusive, . . 190 

Table No. 37. — Colors of Water from various Parts of the Metropolitan Water Works in 

1916 191 



CONTEXTS. vii 

Appendix No. 2 — Concluded. page 

Table No. 38. — Temperatures of Water from Variou3 Parts of the Metropolitan Water 

Works in 1916, 192 

Table No. 39. — Temperatures of the Air at Three Stations on the Metropolitan Water 

Works in 1916 193 

Table No. 40 — Table showing Length of Main Lines of Water Pipes and Connections 
owned and operated by Metropolitan Water and Sewerage Board, and 
Number of Valves set in Same, Dec. 31, 1916, ..... 194 
Table No. 41 N — Statement of Cast-iron Hydrant, Blow-off and Drain Pipes, owned and 

operated by Metropolitan Water and Sewerage Board, Dec. 31, 1916, . 195 
Table No. 42. — Length of Water Pipes, Four Inches in Diameter and Larger, in the Several 
Cities and Towns supplied by the Metropolitan Water Works, Dec. 31, 

1916, 196 

Table No. 43. — Number of Service Pipes, Meters*and Fire Hydrants in the Several Cities 

and Towns supplied by the Metropolitan Water Works, . . . 197 

Table No. 44. — Average Elevations of the Hydraulic Grade Line in Feet above Boston 
City Base for each Month at Stations on the Metropolitan Water Works 

during 1916, 198 

Appendix No. 3. — Water Works Statistics for the Year 1916, ...... 200 

Appendix No. 4. — Contracts relating to the Metropolitan Sewerage Works, made and pending 

during the Year 1916, 202 

Appendix No. 5. — Financial Statement presented to the General Court on Jan. 16, 1917, . 207 

Appendix No. 6. — Legislation of the Year 1916 affecting the Metropolitan Water and Sewerage 

Board, 212 



LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS. 

Bellevue Reservoir, ............ Frontispiece 

Interior of Sudbury Power Plant, ........... 50 



Metropolitan Water and Sewerage Board. 



To the Honorable the Senate and House of Representatives of the Commonwealth of 
Massachusetts in General Court assembled. 

The Metropolitan Water and Sewerage Board, established under 
the provisions of chapter 168 of the Acts of the year 1901, has 
already presented to your Honorable Body an abstract of the ac- 
count of its receipts, expenditures, disbursements, assets and lia- 
bilities for the fiscal year ending on November 30, 1916, and now, 
in accordance with the provisions of chapter 235 of the Acts of the 
year 1906, presents a detailed statement of its doings for the calendar 
year ending on December 31, 1916, being its 

SIXTEENTH ANNUAL REPORT. 

I. ORGANIZATION AND ADMINISTRATION. 

Boaed, Officers and Employees. 

The term of office of Edward A. McLaughlin expired on March 
20, and he was reappointed for the term of three years next suc- 
ceeding. At the end of the year the Board consisted of Henry P. 
Walcott, chairman, Edward A. McLaughlin and Thomas E. Dwyer. 
William N. Davenport has continued as secretary. Alfred F. Bridg- 
man has been the purchasing agent and Miss Alice G. Mason the 
bookkeeper. 

There are also employed in the administrative office a paymaster, 
an assistant in auditing, two general clerks, three stenographers and 
clerks, a telephone operator, and a janitor with two assistants, both 
of whom act as watchmen. 

Such general conveyancing work and investigation of real estate 
titles in the different counties as have been called for during the 
year have been performed by George D. Bigelow. 

The consulting engineers of the Board are Hiram F. Mills and 
Frederic P. Stearns, who are called upon for services when matters 
arise which require their consideration. 



2 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

William E. Foss, who had been Acting Chief Engineer of Water 
Works since the death of Mr. Brackett, was appointed Chief En- 
gineer of Water Works in May, and John L. Howard was appointed 
Assistant to the Chief Engineer in November. The following have 
continued as superintendents of departments under the direction of 
the Chief Engineer: Elliot R. B. Allardice, Superintendent of the 
Wachusett Department; Charles E. Haberstroh, Superintendent of 
the Sudbury and Cochituate Works and of the portion of the Weston 
Aqueduct above the Weston Reservoir; Samuel E. Killam, Super- 
intendent in charge of the Weston Reservoir and the remaining 
portion of the Weston Aqueduct, and of all distributing reservoirs 
and pipe lines within the Metropolitan Water District; and Arthur 
E. O'Neil, Superintendent of the several Water Works pumping 
stations. 

The average engineering force employed on construction and main- 
tenance during the year has included, in addition to the Chief En- 
gineer, 4 department superintendents, 1 division engineer, 10 assist- 
ant engineers and 29 others in various engineering capacities, and 
as sanitary inspectors, clerks, stenographers and messengers, the 
total force numbering 45. 

A maintenance force in addition to those engaged in engineering 
capacities, as above mentioned, numbering upon the average during 
the year 258, has been required at the pumping stations, upon 
reservoirs, aqueducts, pipe lines and upon minor construction work. 
At the end of the year this force numbered 233. 

Frederick D. Smith, Chief Engineer of Sewerage Works, has had 
charge of both construction and maintenance of the works. He has 
been assisted by Henry T. Stiff, Division Engineer in charge of the 
office and drafting, by 4 assistant engineers and by 21 others em- 
ployed in different engineering capacities, and by 2 stenographers 
and clerks. 

The maximum engineering force employed at any one time during 
the year on the construction and maintenance of the Sewerage 
Works was 31. 

The regular maintenance force required in addition for the oper- 
ation of the pumping stations, the care and inspection of the sewers, 
and for other parts of the Sewerage Works, exclusive of the engineers 
and day-labor forces, on the average has been 163. 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 3 

The whole regular force of the Sewerage Department at the end of 
the year numbered 191, of whom the Chief Engineer and 28 assist- 
ants and draftsmen were engaged in general upon the works, and 
of the remainder, 100 were employed upon the North System and 
63 upon the South System. 

The maximum number of men employed upon contracts and upon 
day-labor construction on the Sewerage Works during the year was 
for the week ending June 25, when the number amounted to 195. 

II. METROPOLITAN WATER DISTRICT. 

The Metropolitan Water District now comprises the cities of 
Boston, Chelsea, Everett, Maiden, Medford, Melrose, Newton, 
Quincy, Revere and Somerville, and the towns of Arlington, Bel- 
mont, Lexington, Milton, Nahant, Stoneham, Swampscott, Water- 
town and Winthrop, — in all 10 cities and 9 towns. The District 
has an area of 174.8 square miles, no additional municipalities 
having been admitted into the District during the year. Its popu- 
lation, according to the State Census taken for April 1, 1915, was 
1,201,300. The population of the District on July 1, 1916, the date 
upon which calculations for the Water Works are based, was esti- 
mated as 1,234,180. 

III. METROPOLITAN WATER WORKS — CONSTRUCTION. 

The total amount expended for the construction and acquisition 
of the Metropolitan Water Works since the passage of the Met- 
ropolitan Water Act in the year 1895 has been $42,923,591.63. 

The total amount expended during the calendar year on account 
of the construction and acquisition of works has been $105,420.99. 
The details of this expenditure are as follows: on account of the 
construction of a steel tank or reservoir on Bellevue Hill with con- 
necting pipe lines and the reinforcement of the southern high-service 
pipe lines in Milton, the sum of $17,679.05; for work on account of 
the power plant at Sudbury Dam and the construction of the Wachu- 
sett-Sudbury transmission line, $47,190.29; for laying 60-inch 
Weston Aqueduct Supply Mains, Section 5, $26,354.15; for reloca- 
tion of meters and connections, $3,458.18; for stock on hand, 
$2,755.65; and for other minor works, engineering and adminis- 
tration expenses, the sum of $7,983.67. 



4 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

A steel tank for the southern extra high-service reservoir on Belle- 
vue Hill in West Roxbury, which is 100 feet in diameter and 44 
feet 3 inches in height and has a capacity of 2,500,000 gallons, has 
been completed during the year and is now in successful operation. 
The entire work was completed on July 11. The masonry tower 
which encloses the tank has been built under a contract with John 
Cashman & Sons Co. The tower is 114 feet 2 inches in outside 
diameter at the base and 108 feet 2 inches in inside diameter. It 
is 47f feet in height from the concrete foundation to the top of the 
cornice. A parapet wall 4 feet in height above the cornice sur- 
rounds the roof. The tower is of Bay View gray Rockport granite 
backed with concrete, with the exception of that portion of the 
tower which is below the surface of the ground, which is of concrete. 

Work upon the 60-inch Weston Aqueduct supply main, con- 
necting with that portion laid in 1909 and 1910, extending through 
Commonwealth Avenue to the Charles River, a distance of about 
14,500 feet, has been completed. By the completion of this pipe 
line an addition of 19,000,000 gallons daily has been made to the 
capacity of the Weston Aqueduct. As the water so delivered is at 
present sufficient to supply Spot Pond without the pumping which 
has hitherto been necessary at the low-service station at Chestnut 
Hill, it will be seen that a very substantial saving has been effected 
by reason of this reduction in pumping and the direct delivery of 
the water to Spot Pond. 

The construction of the hydro-electric plant to use the water 
power available at the Sudbury Dam in Southborough has been 
completed and a portion of the electric energy to be produced was 
delivered to the Edison Electric Manufacturing Co. on September 
14. At the end of the year the full capacity of the station was 
reached. 

It is the intention of the Board to construct an electric trans- 
mission line from the station at the Sudbury Dam to the station at 
Wachusett Dam in order that the full production of these two sta- 
tions may be used in a manner most advantageous to this project. 
The transmission line has not yet been built but a part of the 
material for it has been assembled and it is proposed to proceed 
with the work during the coming season. Upon its completion of the 
scheme for the utilization of the power, which would otherwise 
have been wasted, by the fall of water at these two dams, the Met- 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 5 

ropolitan District will have secured and will continue to receive for all 
time a very substantial income, which will not only do something 
to relieve the burden of debt resting upon the District but will also 
more than restore to the district in which a serious destruction of 
existing water powers was made an amount of power far in excess of 
anything which that district had ever enjoyed. 

By chapter 814 of the Acts of 1913 authority was given the Board 
to improve Beaver Dam Brook in the towns of Ashland, Framing- 
ham, Sherborn and Natick. The improvement was offered for con- 
tract on July 24 but the lowest bid was $20,000 in excess of the 
amount available for the work and the Board was accordingly 
unable to carry out the provisions of this legislation. 

IV. WATER WORKS — MAINTENANCE. 

The maintenance and operation of the Metropolitan Water Works 
during the past calendar year have required the expenditure of 
$445,784.99. 

(1) Stokage Reservoirs. 

The water in the Wachusett Reservoir reached its highest ele- 
vation, 395.75, on June 11. 

The Sudbury Reservoir was maintained at a low level until March 
15 in order to facilitate the changes which were being made at the 
Sudbury Dam for the installation of the power plant, after which 
time the reservoir was allowed to fill. Framingham Reservoir No. 
3 and Lake Cochituate have been kept nearly full during the greater 
part of the year. 

It has not been necessary to draw water for the supply of the Met- 
ropolitan District from Framingham Reservoir No. 1, Framingham 
Reservoir No. 2, Farm Pond, Ashland, Hopkinton and Whitehall 
reservoirs and Lake Cochituate. 

In accordance with the recommendation made by the Board in 
its report to the Legislature of last year, an act, chapter 94 of the 
Acts of 1916, was passed restoring Dudley Pond, which had been 
hitherto a portion of the Cochituate Lake supply, to the town of 
Way land. The transfer of the pond was accepted by the town on 
April 18. 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



(2) Aqueducts. 

The Wachusett Aqueduct was in service for the passage of water 
from the Wachusett Reservoir to the Sudbury Reservoir during the 
whole or portions of 321 days. The quantity of water flowing through 
the aqueduct was equal to an average of 102,317,486 gallons per 
day for the entire year. Of the total quantity of water admitted 
to the aqueduct 79.1 per cent, was used before its admission for the 
development of electric energy. 

For distribution to the cities and towns of the Metropolitan 
District water was drawn through the Sudbury Aqueduct to the 
Chestnut Hill Reservoir every day in the year, the daily average 
for the whole year being 50,360,000 gallons. 

The Weston Aqueduct was in use on 353 days, the quantity of 
water delivered through the aqueduct being equivalent to a daily 
average of 52,699,000 gallons. 

(3) Pumping Stations. 

The total amount of water pumped at all the pumping stations 
was 22,039,270,000 gallons, which is 5,667,030,000 gallons less than 
in the previous year. 

The following are the several pumping stations : — 



Number 

of 
Engines. 



Contract 

Capacity per 

Day 

(Gallons). 



Lift (Feet). 



Chestnut Hill high-service station, 
Chestnut Hill low-service station, 
Chestnut Hill low-service station, 
Spot Pond Station, 
Arlington station, 
Hyde Park station, 



66,000,000 

105,000,000 

40,000,000 

30,000,000 

3,000,000 

6,000,000 



138 
60 
130 
125 
290 
140 



The amount expended for the operation of the stations was 
$98,273.22, which is slightly more than for the year 1915. 

The total amount of coal purchased during the year was 7,675.53 
gross tons, of which 5,738.18 tons were bituminous and 1,937.35 
tons anthracite. All of the anthracite coal was buckwheat and 
screenings. The cost of bituminous coal delivered in the bins at 
the various stations varied from $4.18 to $5.55, and the cost of 
anthracite coal varied from $2.98 to $3.37 per ton. 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 7 

(4) Protection op the Water Supply. 

The Marlborough Brook filter-beds, on which is filtered the water 
received from brooks passing through the thickly settled portions 
of Marlborough, have been adequate for the filtration of all the 
water received. 

The Pegan Brook pumping station, at which is pumped upon the 
filter-beds the surface drainage of about one square mile in the 
thickly settled portion of Natick, was in successful operation 251 
days in the year. 

The filter-beds which receive for filtration the water flowing 
through the thickly settled portion of the town of Sterling, as well 
as the smaller filter-beds which receive the drainage from a few 
houses near Sterling Junction, the Worcester County Training 
School at West Boylston and from the swimming pool at South- 
borough, have been in successful operation and required only the 
usual attention during the year. 

Studies for the disposal of manufacturing wastes, as well as for 
the disposal of house drainage from the various towns within the 
drainage area of the Metropolitan Water System, have been in 
progress during the year. 

Some of the territory lying about the origin of Gates Brook near 
the boundary line between the town of West Boylston and the City 
of Worcester has been for some years a menace to the purity of the 
waters of the Wachusett Reservoir. Quite recently a number of 
small houses with insufficient provision for the disposal of their 
waste matter have been erected in this district. It has seemed to 
the Board that the most effective remedy for the conditions thus 
existing would be obtained by the purchase of the margins of the 
brook and such regulation of its course as would make the direct 
introduction of sewage into it impossible. The necessary land has 
been secured and a considerable portion of the work for the regu- 
lation of the brook has been effected. This work will be completed 
during the coming season. 

Constant inspection of the watersheds has been maintained by the 
Sanitary Inspector and his assistants and members of the main- 
tenance force. 

Chemical examinations of the waters used were made by the 
State Department of Health, and in addition^ microscopical and 



8 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

bacterial examinations were made by the Board. These examina- 
tions enable the Board to take measures to remedy any difficulties 
which are found to exist. 

The quality of the water brought to the Metropolitan District 
continues to be satisfactory both in taste and in appearance. This 
condition results in a large measure from the fact that it is still 
possible to reject some of the sources which were in use before the 
extension of the water works to the South Branch of the Nashua 
River at Clinton. The water derived from the Wachusett water- 
shed has been of superior quality to that coming from the Sudbury 
and Cochituate sources. The first-named supply, so far as possible, 
has been that conveyed to the District; the others have been 
wasted to a greater or less extent as occasion has permitted. 

The time, however, is approaching when all the sources will be 
required for the supply of the District. When that day arrives it 
will be necessary, without doubt, to filter these inferior waters in 
order to bring them to the standard of excellence to which the 
District has become accustomed since the establishment of the Met- 
ropolitan water supply. 

The subject of adequate filtration has been carefully considered, 
and whenever the need of such treatment becomes urgent, the Board 
will be in a position at once to construct the necessary works. 

During the year the Board acquired the fee of 30.142 acres of 
land for the protection and improvement of the water supply. 

(5) Clinton Sewerage Works. 
The Board has maintained and operated since September 15, 1899, 
works for the disposal of the sewage of the town of Clinton on lands 
acquired for the purpose in the town of South Lancaster under the 
authority of chapter 557 of the Acts of the year 1898. By section 3 
of this chapter "The metropolitan water board shall maintain and 
operate the works constructed by it, unless otherwise agreed by said 
board and the town of Clinton, until the sewage of said town shall 
have outgrown the normal capacity of the south branch of the 
Nashua river to properly dispose thereof; and then said board shall 
transfer to said town all the works, lands, water rights, rights of 
way, easements and other property constructed and acquired under 
the provisions hereof, upon such terms as may be agreed upon by 
said board and said town, and thereafter said works, lands, water 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 9 

rights, rights of way, easements and other property shall be owned, 
maintained and operated by the town of Clinton under the supervi- 
sion and control of the state board of health, and said town shall 
pay to the Commonwealth for the property so transferred such sum 
or sums, if any, as may be agreed by said town and said board to 
be just and proper." 

In the opinion of the Board the time is near at hand, if it has 
not already been reached, when this provision of the statute should 
become operative. Repeated examinations of the material now 
treated upon the South Lancaster filter-beds both as to quantity 
and quality would seem to show that the amount of sewage here 
treated could not be turned into the South Branch of the Nashua 
River without producing conditions of serious importance to the 
inhabitants of the towns on the stream below this point. 

(6) Forestry. 

An area of four acres of the Wachusett Reservoir marginal lands 
was planted with 3,400 three-year-old pine seedlings from the North 
Dike nursery, and 9,100 three-year-old white pine seedlings and 1,800 
four-year-old white spruce seedlings were planted where previous 
plantings had failed in West Boylston and Sterling. 

Since the beginning of forestal work on Wachusett Reservoir 
marginal lands 1,424 acres have been planted. 

Undesirable trees and other growth of an inferior character have 
been cut where there was a growth of young white pines from five 
to eight years old. It has been the policy of the Board to remove, 
so far as a convenient use of the working force of the department is 
possible, undesirable trees and underbrush on various portions of 
the lands controlled by it. In the two nurseries maintained at 
Oakdale and the North Dike there are at present in good condition 
355,040 seedlings. 

About 39 acres of Sudbury marginal lands were cleared of trees 
and brush for planting and on these lands and along the aqueducts 
and reservoirs 49,500 four-year-old seedlings and 1,400 five to seven- 
year-old pines from the woods were set out. There are now in the 
Sudbury nursery 200,000 seedlings which will be ready for trans- 
planting next spring. 

The ravages of the gypsy and brown-tail moths and of the elm- 
leaf beetle and the pine tree weevil have continued during the year, 



10 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

requiring a large amount of work and considerable expense to pro- 
tect the trees on lands controlled by the Board. The egg clusters 
of the gypsy moth have been painted with creosote and nests of the 
brown-tail moths destroyed by burning, and extensive spraying has 
been required for the preservation of trees infested by moths and elm- 
leaf beetles. The pine tree blister has not yet been found on the 
Wachusett reservoir lands. 

(7) Wachusett Power Plant. 

The hydro-electric power station at the Wachusett Dam was oper- 
ated on 297 days during the year. The daily output varied from the 
minimum amount which the Connecticut River Transmission Com- 
pany is required to take under its contract, to the full capacity of 
the plant. The operation of the plant continues to be successful, the 
gross earnings for the year being $34,231.63. The cost of operating 
the plant has been $14,633.72, the net earnings $19,597.91, and the 
net earnings per thousand kilowatt hours generated, $3,032. 

(8) Sudbury Power Plant. 

A portion of the hydro-electric machinery at the Sudbury power 
station was put into regular service on September 14 and the en- 
tire plant has been in service since November 26. The entire output, 
with the exception of a small amount of energy used for lighting 
the station and operating the electrically driven accessories has been 
sold to the Edison Electric Illuminating Company of Boston under 
a contract dated December 21, 1914. Between September 14, when 
it was started, and the end of the year the station was operated on 
90 days, and since November 26 all of the water discharged from the 
Sudbury Reservoir has been used for the generation of electric 
energy. The gross earnings for the portion of the year during which 
the station was in operation were $6,663.21, the cost -of operating 
the plant $3,602.53 and the net earnings $3,060.68. The net earnings 
per thousand kilowatt hours generated were $2,871. 

(9) Rainfall and Water Supply. 
The rainfall is still below the average, and somewhat less than in 
the preceding year. On the Wachusett watershed the rainfall was 
43.43 inches and on the Sudbury watershed 39.96 inches, while the 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 11 

averages for the periods covered by the records have been, respec- 
tively, 45.30 inches and 44.67 inches. 

The Wachusett watershed yielded a daily average of 1,215,000 
gallons of water per square mile, and the Sudbury watershed yielded 
a daily average of 904,000 gallons. The Wachusett watershed has 
yielded a daily average of 1,073,000 gallons per square mile, for 
the 20 years during which measurements have been made, and the 
daily average per square mile from the Sudbury watershed during 
the 42 years for which records have been kept has been 986,000 
gallons. 

(10) Water Consumption. 

During the year the quantity of water supplied to the Metro- 
politan Water District amounted to a daily average of 106,337,800 
gallons, as measured by Metropolitan Water Works meters, which 
was equivalent to 89 gallons for each person in the District. This 
quantity was 4,396,300 gallons more than the average daily con- 
sumption of the preceding year. 

Acting under the authority conferred by several statutes and 
arrangements which have been made, water has been supplied to 
a limited extent outside of the Metropolitan Water District. There 

has been drawn from the open channel of the Wachusett Aqueduct 

» 

for the use of the Westborough State Hospital a daily average 
quantity of 172,000 gallons. The town of Framingham has, under 
the provisions of the statute, drawn indirectly from Farm Pond a 
daily average quantity of 629,235 gallons and directly from the 
Sudbury Aqueduct 235,246 gallons. A portion of the town of Saugus 
has been supplied through the city of Revere with an average of 
19,200 gallons daily. The United States Government, for use on 
Peddock's Island, has been supplied with a daily average of 69,100 
gallons. The sums charged for the water thus supplied have 
amounted to $6,082.01. 

V. WATER WORKS — FINANCIAL STATEMENT. 

The financial abstract of the receipts, disbursements, assets and 
liabilities of the Board for the State fiscal year, beginning with 
December 1, 1915, and ending with November 30, 1916, was, in 
accordance with the requirements of chapter 235 of the Acts of the 
year 1906, presented to the General Court in January last, and a 
copy of this financial abstract is printed as Appendix No. 5. 



12 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

As required by said chapter a detailed statement of its doings for 
the calendar year 1916, in relation to the Metropolitan Water Works, 
is herewith presented. 

Construction. 

(1) Water Loans — Receipts and Payments. 

Total loans authorized to January 1, 1917, $42,798,000 00 

Receipts from the sales of property applicable to the construc- 
tion and acquisition of works : — 

For the period prior to January 1, 1916, . . $244,933 56 
For the year ending December 31, 1916, . . 7,545 23 

252,478 79 

Receipt from the town of Swampscott for admission to District 

(St. 1909, c. 320), 90,000 00 

Total amount authorized to January 1, 1917, . . . $43,140,478 79 
Amounts approved by Board for payments out of Water Loan 
Fund: — 

Payments prior to January 1, 1916, . $42,818,170 64 
Approved for year ending December 31, 

1916, 105,420 99 

42,923,591 63 

Amount authorized but not expended January 1, 1917, . $216,887 16 

(2) Total Water Debt, December 31, 1916. 

Water Loan Outstanding, Sinking Fund and Debt. 

Bonds issued by the Treasurer of the Commonwealth: — 

Sinking fund bonds (3 and 3J per cent.), .... $41,398,000 00 
Serial bonds (3| and 4 per cent.), 1,204,000 00 

Total bond issue to December 31, 1916, .... $42,602,000 00 

Serial bonds paid prior to January 1, 1916, . . $42,000 00 
Serial bonds paid in 1916, 30,000 00 

72,000 00 

Total bond issue outstanding December 31, 1916, . . $42,530,000 00 

Gross Water Debt, $42,530,000 00 

Sinking fund December 31, 1916, 13,268,199 36 

Net Water Debt December 31, 1916, $29,261,800 64 

A decrease for the year of $740,954.11. 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



13 



(3) Metropolitan Water Loan and Sinking Fund, 
December. 31, 1916. 



Yeab. 



Authorized 
Loans. 


Bonds 

issued (Sinking 

Fund). 


Bonds 

issued (Serial 

Bonds). 


Sinking Fund. 


$27,000,000 


$5,000,000 


- 


$226,286 05 


- 


2,000,000 


- 


699,860 70 


- 


6,000,000 


- 


954,469 00 


- 


4,000,000 


- 


1,416,374 29 


- 


3,000,000 


- 


1,349,332 97 


- 


1,000,000 


- 


1,573,619 72 


13,000,000 


10,000,000 


. 


1,662,426 95 


- 


3,500,000 


- 


2,256,803 81 


- 


1,500,000 


- 


2,877,835 59 


- 


2,500,000 


- 


3,519,602 92 


- 


650,000 


- 


4,207,045 69 


500,000 


1,350,000 


- 


4,897,822 62 


- 


- 


- 


5,643,575 69 


398,000 


- 


- 


6,419,283 28 


900,000 


398,000 


- 


7,226,262 31 


80,000 


500,000 


- 


8,089,902 91 


212,000 


- 


$200,000 


8,953,437 44 


600,000 


- 


190,000 


9,829,356 80 


108,000 


- 


- 


10,767,701 68 


-' 


- 


258,000 


11,533,453 45 


- 


- 


490,000 


12,491,245 25 


- 


- 


66,000 


13,268,199 36 


$42,798,000 


$41,398,000 


$1,204,000 


* 



1895, 
1896, 
1897, 
1898, 
1899, 
1900, 
1901, 
1902, 
1903, 
1904, 
1905, 
1906, 
1907, 
1908, 
1909, 
1910, 
1911, 
1912, 
1913, 
1914, 
1915, 
1916, 



(4) Water Assessment, 1916. 
The following water assessment was made by the Treasurer of the 
Commonwealth upon the various municipalities : — 

Sinking fund requirements, $261,423 18 

Serial bonds, $32,000 00 

Less premium, 2,096 16 

29,903 84 

Interest, . 1,461,219 41 

Maintenance: — * 

Appropriated by Legislature, .... $480,850 00 

Less balance on hand, 53,803 84 

■ — ■ — 427,046 16 

Total water assessment for 1916, $2,179,592 59 



14 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



In accordance with chapter 488, Acts of 1895, as amended in 1901, 
1904 and 1906, the proportion to be paid by each city and town is 
based one-third in proportion to their respective valuations and 
the remaining two-thirds in proportion to their respective water 
consumption for the preceding year, except that but one-fifth of 
the total valuation and no consumption has been taken for the 
city of Newton, as it has not been supplied with water from the 
Metropolitan Works. 

The division of the assessment for 1916 was as follows: — 



Cities and Towns. 


Assessment. 


Cities and Towns. 


Assessment. 


Everett, 

Medford 


$18,118 96 
10,143 81 
1,669,432 79 
52,114 06 
48,779 28 
8,698 76 
47,323 31 
28,997 29 
18,936 29 
16,874 40 




5,324 75 

6,183 51 

51,468 91 

29,548 74 

110,468 29 

7,506 52 

11,937 62 

21,708 75 

16,026 55 




$2,179,592 59 



(5) Supplying Water to Cities and Towns outside of 
District and to Water Companies. 

Sums having been received during the year 1916 under the provi- 
sions of the Metropolitan Water Act, for water furnished, as fol- 
lows : — 

Town of Framingham, $1,816 01 

City of Revere (on account of water furnished to a portion of the 

town of Saugus for 1915), 300 00 

United States Government (for Peddock's Island), .... 1,268 97 

Westborough State Hospital, 2,320 65 



$5,705 63 



The sums so received prior to March 23, 1907, were annually dis- 
tributed among the cities and towns of the District; but since that 
date, in accordance with the provisions of chapter 238 of the Acts 
of 1907, the sums so received have been paid into the sinking fund. 



No. 57.J 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



15 



(6) Expenditures for the Different Works. 

The following is a summary of the expenditures made in the vari- 
ous operations for the different works : — 



Construction and Acquisition of Works. 



For the Year ending 
December 31, 1916. 



Administration applicable to all parts of the construction and acquisition of 

the works, 

Wachusett Department, real estate, . . . . . 

Wachusett Aqueduct, real estate, 

Power Plant at Sudbury Dam, 

Wachusett-Sudbury Power Transmission Line, 

Beaver Dam Brook improvement, 

Distribution system: — 
Northern high service: — 

Pipe lines and connections, 

Northern extra high service: — 

Pipe lines and connections, . . ' . . . . 

Southern high service : — 

Section 43 (24-inch main in Dorchester through Milton to Quincy), 
Southern extra high service: — 

Pipe lines and connections, 

Section 44 (12-inch connection in West Roxbury), ...... 

Belle vue Reservoir on Bellevue Hill in Boston, . . . 

Weston Aqueduct supply mains, . . 

Meters and connections, 

Real estate 

Stock — pipes, valves, castings, etc., purchased and sent first to storage yards, 
and later transferred, as needed, to the various parts of the work: — 

Amount received, 

Transferred from storage yards to the various sections of the work and in- 
cluded in costs of special works, 



Amount charged from beginning of work to January 1, 1916, . 

Total for construction and acquisition of works to January 1, 1917, 





$5,560 04 




6 50 




300 00 




46,175 84 




1,014 45 




1,214 27 


$200 00 




202 86 





1,153 19 



15 00 




136 59 




16,374 27 




26,354 15 




3,458 18 




500 00 






48,394 24 




$4,133 70 




1,378 05 






9 7*\\ fi^ 








$105,420 99 




42,818,170 64 




$42,923,591 63 



16 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



Maintenance and Operation. 



For the Year ending 
December 31, 1916. 



Administration, 

General supervision 

Taxes and other expenses, 

Wachusett Department: — 

Superintendence, 

Reservoir, 

Forestry, . 

Protection of supply 

Buildings and grounds, 

Wachusett Dam, 

Wachusett Aqueduct, 

Clinton sewerage system: — <• 

Pumping station, 

Sewers, screens and filter-beds, .......... 

Sanitary inspection, 

Swamp drainage, 

Power plant, 

Payments under Industrial Accident Law and special benefit appropriations, 

Sudbury Department: — 

Superintendence, Framingham office, 

Ashland Reservoir, 

Hopkinton Reservoir, 

Whitehall Reservoir, 

Framingham Reservoirs Nos. 1, 2 and 3, 

Sudbury Reservoir, 

Lake Cochituate, 

Marlborough Brook filters, 

Pegan filters, 

Sudbury and Cochituate watersheds, 

Sanitary inspection, 

Cochituate Aqueduct, 

Sudbury Aqueduct, 

Weston Aqueduct, 

Forestry, 

Payments under Industrial Accident Law and special benefit appropriations, 
Power plant, 

Distribution Department: — 

Superintendence, . 

Pumping service: — 

Superintendence, 

Payments under Industrial Accident Law and special benefit appropriations, 

Arlington pumping station, pumping service, 

Chestnut Hill low-service pumping station, pumping service, 
Chestnut Hill high-service pumping station, pumping service, 

Spot Pond pumping station, pumping service, 

Hyde Park pumping station, pumping service, 

Bear Hill Reservoir, 

Chestnut Hill Reservoir and grounds, 

Amounts carried forward, 



$8,345 46 
7,146 97 
9,981 23 
9,903 30 
3,207 34 
5,000 34 
7,290 21 

1,473 88 
5,625 08 
824 32 
3,298 29 
5,635 16 
59 86 



$10,300 77 
1,710 25 
2,478 71 
808 26 
6,918 78 
17,405 43 
5,276 34 
3,116 63 
3,961 54 
1,097 42 
3,250 85 
2,609 60 
5,404 46 
5,189 69 
6,229 77 
1,304 49 
2,321 39 



$5,899 20 

2,624 49 

536 00 

10,371 88 

52,085 15 

11,337 69 

14,288 72 

7,029 29 

152 50 

15,636 05 



$13,358 39 
34,122 83 
42,647 55 



67,791 34 



79,384 38 



$119,960 97 $237,304 49 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



17 



Maintenance and Operation. 



For the Year ending 
December 31, 1916. 



Amounts brought forvxird, 



Distribution Department — Con. 

Fells Reservoir, 

Forbes Hill Reservoir, 

Mystic Lake, conduit and pumping station, 

Mystic Reservoir 

Arlington standpipe, 

Waban Hill Reservoir, 

Weston Reservoir, 

Spot Pond, 

Buildings at Spot Pond, 

Pipe lines: — 

Low service, 

Northern high service, . 

Northern extra high service, 

Southern high service, 

Southern extra high service, 

Supply pipe lines, 

Buildings at Chestnut Hill Reservoir, 

Chestnut Hill pipe yard, 

Glenwood pipe yard and buildings, 

Stables, 

Venturi meters, 

Measurement of water, 

Arlington pumping station, building9 and grounds, 

Hyde Park pumping station, buildings and grounds, 

Fisher Hill Reservoir 

Bellevue Reservoir, 

Payments under Industrial Accident Law and special benefit appropriations, 



$119,960 97 $237,304 49 



Total for maintaining and operating works, 



818 61 




1,317 25 




3,496 48 




1,037 25 




27 81 




244 02 




4,080 41 




10,925 33 




203 87 




23,796 52 




5,826 98 




264 21 




6,483 34 




369 29 




2,444 91 




6,195 27 




1,521 63 




2,690 58 




10,432 09 




919 67 




1,531 79 




358 53 




320 18 




2,245 88 




286 20 




681 43 






208,480 50 


- 


$445,784 99 



(7) Detailed Financial Statement under Metropolitan 

Water Act. 

The Board herewith presents, in accordance with the requirements 
of the Metropolitan Water Act, a detailed statement of the expendi- 
tures and disbursements, receipts, assets and liabilities for the year 
1916. 

(a) Expenditures and Disbursements, 

The total amount of the expenditures and disbursements on ac- 
count of construction and acquisition of works for the year beginning 
January 1, 1916, and ending December 31, 1916, was $105,420.99, 
and the total amount from the time of the organization of the Met- 



18 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



ropolitan Water Board, July 19, 1895, to December 31, 1916, has 
been $42,923,591.63. 

For maintenance and operation the expenditures for the year 
were $445,784.99. 

The salaries of the commissioners, and the other expenses of 
administration, have been apportioned to the construction of the 
works and to the maintenance and operation of the same, and 
appear under each of those headings. 

The following is a division of the expenditures according to their 
general character: — 



General Character op Expenditures. 



For the Year ending 
December 31, 1916. 



Construction of Works and Acquisition by Purchase or Taking. 

Administration. 

Commissioners, 

Secretary, 

Clerks and stenographers, 

Traveling 

Stationery and printing, 

Postage, express and telegrams, . 

Telephone, lighting, heating, water and care of building, 

Rent and taxes, main office, 

Engineering. 

Chief engineer 

Principal assistant engineers, '. 

Engineering assistants, 

Inspectors, 

Railroad and street car travel, 

Wagon hire, 

Stationery and printing, 

Postage, express and telegrams, 

Engineering and drafting supplies, 

Engineering and drafting instruments and tools, 

Books, maps and photographic supplies, 

Telephone, lighting, heating, water and care of buildings: — 

Main office, * . 

Sub-offices, 

Rent and taxes, main office 

Unclassified supplies, 

Miscellaneous expenses, 

Construction. 
Preliminary work: — 
Advertising, 

Airumnt carried forward 



$2,433 34 

750 00 

1,780 28 

15 00 

157 59 

35 36 

241 55 

146 92 



$17 31 

2,041 29 

3,264 90 

1,266 99 

215 77 

244 00 

168 05 

65 

46 06 

12 30 

13 45 

724 64 

17 80 

440 78 

60 

119 27 



$76 64 



$5,560 04 



8,593 86 



76 64 



$14,230 54 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



19 



General Character op Expenditures. 



For the Year ending 
December 31, 1916. 



Amount brought forward, 

Construction — Con. 
Contracts, Distribution System: — 

Camoia & Williams, laying water pipe on Section 33 northern high-service 
pipe lines, Contract 308, 

John Cashman & Sons Co., for building masonry tower on Bellevue Hill in 
Boston, Contract 368, 

Andrew M. Cusack, for laying water pipes on portion of Section 5 of the 
Weston Aqueduct Supply Mains in Newton, Contract 369, . 

Charles A. Kelley, for laying water pipes on portion of Section 5 of the 
Weston Aqueduct Supply Mains in Newton, Contract 370, . 

Builders Iron Foundry, for furnishing Venturi meters and registers, Con- 
tract 375, 

Ludlow Valve Mfg. Co., for furnishing check valves, Contract 378, . 

Standard Cast Iron Pipe & Foundry Co., for furnishing special castings, 

Contract 374, 

Contracts, Power Plant at Sudbury Dam: — 

Lombard Governor Co., for furnishing 3 water wheel governors for use at 
the Power Plant at Sudbury Dam, Agreement of July 21, 1915, 

The Safety Insulated Wire & Cable Co., for underground cable for Hydro- 
electric Plant at Sudbury Dam, Contract 373 

Westinghouse Electric & Mfg. Co., for furnishing and installing Hydro- 
electric Machinery at Sudbury Dam, Contract 364A, .... 

S. Morgan Smith Co., for furnishing and installing hydraulic machinery at 
Sudbury Dam, Contract 364, 

Additional work: — 

Labor, . . 

Traveling, 

Freight and express 

Jobbing and repairing, . 

Tools, machinery, appliances and hardware supplies, 

Electrical supplies, ' . . . . 

Castings, ironwork and metals, 

Iron pipe and valves, ........... 

Paint and coating, 

Fuel, oil and waste, 

Lumber and field buildings, 

Brick, cement and stone 

Sand, gravel and filling, 

Municipal and corporation work, 

Unclassified supplies, 

Miscellaneous expenses, 

Real Estate. 
Legal and expert: — 

Appraisers, 

Conveyancing supplies, 

Conveyancing expenses, 

Amounts carried forward, 



$200 00 

12,326 54 

8,612 88 

5,715 94 

1,972 00 
507 45 

1,040 40 

2,404 00 

1,182 61 

13,082 72 

11,941 68 



$11,998 97 

48 

171 61 

38 56 

1,525 31 

2,263 40 

902 38 

978 90 

215 05 

235 14 

159 95 

502 35 

3 75 

11,998 67 

8 36 

334 59 



$35 00 

6 50 

25 26 



$14,230 54 



58,986 22 



31,337 47 



$66 76 $104,554 23 



20 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



General Character of Expenditures. 



For the Year ending 
December 31, 1916. 



Amounts brought forward, .... 

Real Estate — Con. 
Legal and expert — Con. 
Settlements made by the Board, . 
Judgments, 



Amount charged from beginning of work to January 1, 1916, 

Total amount of construction expenditures to January 1, 1917, 

Maintenance and Operation op Works. 
Administration: — 

Commissioners, 

Secretary and assistants, . 

Rent, 

Repairs of building, 

Fuel 

Lighting, 

Care of building, 

Postage, 

Printing, stationery and office supplies, ....... 

Telephones 

Traveling expenses, 

Miscellaneous expenses, 

General supervision: — 

Chief engineer and assistants, 

Rent, 

Repairs of building, 

Fuel 

Lighting, 

Care of building, 

Postage, 

Printing, stationery and office supplies, 

Telephones 

Traveling expenses, 

Miscellaneous expenses, 

Pumping service: — 

Superintendence 

Labor, 

Fuel 

Oil, waste and packing, 

Repairs, 

Small supplies, 

Payments under Industrial Accident Law and special benefit appropriations 

Amount carried forward, 



$66 76 $104,554 23 



300 00 
500 00 



866 76 



$105,420 99 
42,818,170 64 

$42,923,591 63 



$4,841 66 




5,261 82 




701 95 




23 52 




84 36 




73 91 




454 99 




175 00 




1,402 43 




94 60 




113 31 




130 84 






$13,358 39 


$25,085 02 


2,105 95 




513 85 




253 14 




221 74 




1,365 15 




65 00 




850 01 




300 50 




2,434 41 




928 06 






34,122 83 




$2,624 49 




61,464 92 




29,129 67 




1,333 84 




2,233 61 




950 69 




536 00 






98,273 22 






$145,754 44 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



21 



General Character of Expenditures. 



For the Year ending 
December 31, 1916. 



Amount brought forward, 



Reservoirs, aqueducts, pipe lines, buildings and grounds: — 

Superintendents, 

Engineering assistants, 

Sanitary inspectors, . . . • . . . . 

Labor, pay roll, . . 

Labor, miscellaneous, 

Alterations and repairs of pumping stations, 

Alterations and repairs of other buildings and structures, .... 

Automobiles, . . 

Brick, . • 

Brooms, brushes and janitor's supplies, 

Castings, ironwork and metals, 

Cement and lime, . . . . . 

Drafting and photo supplies, . . 

Fertilizer and planting material, 

Freight and express 

Fuel . . 

Gypsy moth supplies, 

Hardware, . . ... . . . . . 

Hay and grain, . . . 

Lighting, 

Lumber, ....'. 

Machinery 

Paints and oils, 

Pipe and fittings, 

Postage 

Printing, stationery and office supplies, . .- 

Rubber and oiled goods, 

Stable expenses 

Sand, gravel and stone, 

Traveling expenses, 

Telephones, 

Teaming, . 

, Tools and appliances 

Vehicles, harnesses and fittings, 

Miscellaneous expenses, 

Contracts: — 
Thomas Russo & Co., Contract 44-M, for constructing surface drains at 

Spot Pond, . 

Coffin Valve Co., Contract 45-M, for furnishing and installing 3 electrically 

operated sluice gates at Sudbury Dam, 

Crowley & Hickey, Contract 50-M, for constructing the superstructure of 
garage at Chestnut Hill Reservoir, 

Payments under Ind\istrial Accident Law and special benefit appropria- 
tions, 



Payments in lieu of taxes, 

Total expenditures for maintenance and operation, . 



$7,120 00 

12,458 30 

3,267 20 

166,342 89 

3,813 00 

339 01 

1.154 58 
14,845 20 

205 93 

296 84 

1,914 38 

1,119 38 

249 48 

2,064 80 

374 50 

2,631 45 

2,084 37 

1,793 90 

1,573 90 

243 47 

1,474 98 

811 69 

1,492 41 

2,346 43 

104 67 

872 86 

284 13 

559 87 

779 99 

2,623 41 

1.155 66 
4,501 97 
2,972 00 

616 28 
5,194 15 



552 48 
3,983 91 
1,117 75 
2,045 78 



$145,754 44 



257,383 00 
42,647 55 

$445,784 99 



22 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



(b) Receipts. 

The total amount of receipts from the operations of the Board 
and from sales of property for the year beginning January 1, 1916, 
and ending December 31, 1916, was $60,391.38, and the total 
amount from the time of the organization of the Metropolitan Water 
Board, July 19, 1895, to December 31, 1916, has been $1,312,937.18. 
The general character of these receipts is as follows : — 



General Character of Receipts. 



For the Year ending 
December 31, 1916. 



Applicable to the loan fund : — 
Land and buildings, 

Construction tools, supplies and reimbursements, . . 

Applicable to payment of interest, sinking fund requirements and expenses 
of maintenance and operation: — 
Proceeds from operations of the Board: — 

Rents, . . . . > 

Land products 

Electric energy, " . . . 

Maintenance labor, tools, supplies and reimbursements, .... 
Interest and unclassified receipts, 



Applicable to the sinking fund: — 
Water supplied to cities and towns, water companies and others, 



Amount credited from beginning of work to January 1, 1916, 
Total receipts to January 1, 1917, 



$978 00 
6,567 23 



$1,798 75 
3,980 20 

37,136 80 

4,147 06 

77 71 



$7,545 23 



47,140 52 

5,705 63 

$60,391 38 

1,252,545 80 

$1,312,937 18 



The foregoing receipts have been credited to the various objects 
or works, as follows : — 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



23 



Sources of Receipts. 



For the Year ending 
December 31, 1916. 



Supplying water outside of Water District, . 
Construction and acquisition of works: — 

Administration 

Sudbury Reservoir 

Distribution system, 

Diversion of water, Clinton sewerage system, 

Maintenance and operation of works: — 
Administration, . . ■ . . . . . 

General supervision, 

Wachusett Aqueduct 

Wachusett Reservoir 

Wachusett electric power plant, 

Sudbury system, . . . . . . . . 

Sudbury electric power plant 

Distribution system, 

Clinton sewerage system, 

Amount credited from beginning of work to January 1, 1916, 
Total receipts to January 1, 1917, . 



$5,705 63 



$25 19 




183 50 




6,548 73 




803 00 






7,560 42 




$145 86 




250 35 




131 11 




3,508 60 




32,948 75 




1,848 01 




4,220 55 




2,965 23 




1,106 87 






47,125 33 






$60,391 38 




1,252,545 80 




$1,312,937 18 



(c) Assets. 

The following is an abstract of the assets of the Water Works, 
a complete schedule of which is kept on file in the office of the 
Board : — 

Office furniture, fixtures and supplies; engineering and scientific instruments 
and supplies; police supplies; horses, vehicles, field machinery, etc.; ma- 
chinery, tools and other appliances and supplies; completed works, real 
estate and buildings connected therewith. 



(d) Liabilities. 

The sums due on monthly pay rolls amount to $530.67 and there 
are bills for current expenses which have not yet been received. 



24 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



Amounts on Monthly Estimates, not due until Completion of Contracts or until 

Claims are settled. 



Name. 



Work. 



Amount. 



Joseph Hanreddy, .... 

S. Morgan Smith Co., .... 

Westinghouse Electric & Mfg. Co., 

Standard Cast Iron Pipe & Foundry 

Co. 
Builders Iron Foundry, 

Ludlow Valve Mfg. Co., 

Crowley & Hickey, .... 



Contract 314, Section 7 of the Weston Aqueduct 
Supply Mains. 

Contract 364, furnishing and installing hydraulic 
machinery at Sudbury Dam. 

Contract 364A, furnishing and installing hydro- 
electric machinery at Sudbury Dam. 

Contract 374, furnishing special- castings, 

Contract 375, furnishing Venturi meters and regis- 
ters. 
Contract 378, furnishing check valves, 

Contract 50-M, constructing the superstructure of 
garage at Chestnut Hill Reservoir. 



$10 00 
1,326 85 
2,009 19 

183 60 

348 00 
89 55 

197 25 



Claims have been made by the following parties for land taken : — 
Town of Framingham, William H. Buck, heirs of Harrison Eames, 
Lizzie W. Sampson, Nahum F. Brewer, Michael Bishley. 



VI. METROPOLITAN SEWERAGE WORKS. 

The North Metropolitan Sewerage District embraces the cities of 
Cambridge, Chelsea, Everett, Maiden, Medford, Melrose, Revere, 
Somerville and Woburn, and the towns of Arlington, Belmont, 
Reading, Stoneham, Wakefield, Winchester and Winthrop and parts 
of the city of Boston and the town of Lexington, — comprising in 
all 10 cities and 8 towns, with an area of 100.32 square miles. The 
district has an estimated population, based upon the census of 1915, 
as of December 31, 1916, of 620,070. Of the total population it is 
estimated that 89.9 per cent., or 557,160 people, contribute sewage 
to the North Metropolitan System. 

The South Metropolitan Sewerage District includes the cities of 
Newton, Quincy and Waltham, and the towns of Brookline, Milton, 
Watertown and Wellesley, and parts of the city of Boston and the 
town of Dedham, — a total of 4 cities and 5 towns. This district 
has an area of 110.76 square miles, with an estimated population as 
of December 31, 1916, of 455,630. According to the estimates 
made 69.6 per cent, of this population, or 317,005, contribute sewage 
to the South Metropolitan System. 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 25 



(1) North Metropolitan Sewerage System — Construction. 
The amount expended for construction on account of the North 

Metropolitan System during the past year was $131,064.39. 

Work has been carried on in the construction of the extension of 
the Deer Island outfall, authorized by chapter 344 of the Acts of 
1914. The progress of this work has been largely controlled by the 
weather conditions at this exposed headland, but with a favorable 
season it is probable that the new outlet will be ready for service 
before the end of the year, and a substantial even if not complete 
relief will be obtained from the increasingly offensive discharge of 
sewage at this point. The success which has been obtained at the 
deep water outlets for sewage near Peddock's Island gives assurance 
of equally good results here. 

The 'Board was directed by chapter 215 of the General Acts of 
1915 to lower the Metropolitan sewerage siphon under Maiden River 
so as to dredge a river channel of greater depth than is possible with 
the sewer at its then existing level. After consultation with the 
Port Directors it was decided to lower the siphon to a level which 
would make possible a channel 20 feet deep. This work has been 
successfully completed. 

By chapter 159 of the General Acts of 1916 the town of Reading 
was admitted to the North Metropolitan Sewerage District. Surveys 
have been made for the extension of the North Metropolitan Sewer 
to this town and the Board is prepared to proceed with the work 
when satisfactory contracts can be made. It is hoped that it may 
be possible to proceed with the construction of this extension during 
the present year. 

(2) North Metropolitan Sewerage System — Maintenance. 

The cost of the maintenance and operation of the North Metro- 
politan System during the past year was $179,784.85. 

Sewers and Pumping Stations. 

The Metropolitan sewers in the North Metropolitan System now 
extend a distance of 63.902 miles, and the local sewers which are 
connected with the Metropolitan sewers have a further length of 
761.76 miles, involving 82,916 connections. 

The sewage of the North Metropolitan District flows at first by 



26 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



gravity, but before being finally disposed of is lifted at different 
points by pumping and is finally discharged into the harbor from an 
outfall off Deer Island. 

The daily average amount of sewage discharged into the harbor 
was 66,300,000 gallons, a daily average for each person contributing 
sewage of 119 gallons. The increase in the total amount of sewage 
discharged was 5,908,000 gallons per day more than the discharge 
of the preceding year. The maximum rate of discharge in any one 
day was 157,300,000 gallons. 

The pumping stations operated for the North Metropolitan Sewer- 
age System are as follows: — 




Contract 

Capacity per 

Day 

(Gallons). 



Lift (Feet). 



Deer Island station (Boston harbor), 
East Boston station, . 

Charlestown station, . 

Alewife Brook station (Somerville), . 



235,000,000 
235,000,000 

104,000,000 

22,000,000 



19 
19 
11 
8 
13 



There were purchased for the operation of the pumping stations 
7,533 tons of bituminous coal, the average prices of which, at the 
different stations, varied from $4.55 to $5.85 per gross ton delivered 
in the bins. 

The amount expended for the stations was $116,671.49. The 
average cost per million gallons of sewage lifted per foot at the 
several stations was $0,131, a decrease of 3 per cent, from the cost 
last year. 



(3) South Metropolitan Sewerage System — Construction. 

The amount expended for construction on account of the South 
Metropolitan System during the past year was $175,383.44. 

The town of Wellesley was admitted to the South Metropolitan 
Sewerage District by chapter 343 of the Acts of 1914, and the act 
was accepted by the town in March, 1915. 

The necessary surveys were at once undertaken and as soon as 
possible contracts were awarded for four sections out of the nine 
into which the sewer was divided. At the end of the year these 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 27 

four sections have been completed and work is in progress on two 
other sections. If the additional appropriation requested is author- 
ized by the Legislature of the present year the three remaining 
sections of this sewer will be placed under contract at a date early 
enough to permit the completion of the whole line down to the con- 
nection with the main sewer in West Roxbury in the season of 1918. 

The original estimate for the construction of the Wellesley exten- 
sion, High-level sewer, of $350,000 was made by the State Board of 
Health, and was based on a report submitted by an engineer called 
in by that Department to make a survey and estimate. Two lines 
were considered by the Board of Health. The estimate was made 
on the shorter line which came through the location of the Brookline 
Water Works fields. This line was to connect with the existing 
Neponset Valley sewer of the High-level System at a point where the 
sewer has a capacity suitable only for the original district for which 
it was built. 

Because of the small size of this existing Metropolitan sewer and 
the fact that this line extended across the Brookline Water Works 
fields and would interfere with this important supply, and also be- 
cause of the fact that there is a rapidly growing portion of Dedham 
in the vicinity of Bridge Street which is a part of the Metropolitan 
District and has no possible means of reaching the Metropolitan 
System excepting by construction work by the Metropolitan Water 
and Sewerage Board, it was decided to use the alternate line pro- 
posed by the State Board of Health. This is somewhat longer but 
reaches the existing Metropolitan sewer at a point where the latter 
is of increased size and at the same time furnishes a means of outlet 
for the above-named portion of Dedham and obviates the diffi- 
culties in connection with our construction in the fields of the 
Brookline Water Works. 

The Board has also designed a sewer of considerably larger 
capacity than was anticipated by the State Board of Health, feeling 
that the same is justified by the future demands of the District. 

The line adopted has a length of about 40,000 feet almost wholly 
through private lands. The natural physical conditions in this 
part of the Charles River valley make sewer construction very 
expensive. This is occasioned by the large amount of rock en- 
countered and by fine sands and other material in which it is 
expensive to construct and by the remoteness of the location. 



28 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



Because of the above-stated conditions, namely, insufficiency of 
the original appropriation, not based on estimates made by the 
Metropolitan Water and Sewerage Board, and the necessary changes 
in the location to fit the needs of the District, the bad material 
encountered and, above all, the abnormal conditions of the market 
in regard to labor and supplies, it is necessary that an additional 
appropriation be asked for to complete the work. 

The Board acquired by taking, during the year, easements in 
6.925 acres of land in Dedham, Needham and West Roxbury for the 
construction of the Wellesley extension of the High-level sewer. 

(4) South Metropolitan Sewerage System — Maintenance. 
The entire cost of maintenance of the South Metropolitan System 
during the past year was $114,975.93. 

Sewers and Pumping Stations. 

The Metropolitan sewers in the South Metropolitan System, which 
comprise the old Charles River valley sewer and Neponset River 
valley sewer, as well as the new High-level sewer and extensions, 
have a total length of 47.582 miles, and with these are connected 
local sewers having a length of 641.31 miles, involving 43,994 con- 
nections. 

The pumping stations operated for the South Metropolitan Sewer- 
age System are as follows: — 



Number 

of 
Engines. 



Contract 

Capacity per 

Day 

(Gallons). 



Lift (Feet). 



Ward Street station (Roxbury District), . 

Quincy station, 

Quincy sewerage lifting station, 



100,000,000 

18,000,000 

3,000,000 



45 

28 
20 



The sewage of two small areas in Dorchester and Milton, in- 
cluded in the Neponset River valley system, which are too low for 
sewage to be delivered into the High-level sewer by gravity, is, 
under an arrangement with the city of Boston, disposed of through 
the Boston Main Drainage Works at Moon Island. By this arrange- 
ment the Board is relieved from the expense of providing extra 
pumping facilities. 



\ 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 29 

A large part of the sewage of the South District is lifted into the 
High-level sewer at the Ward Street pumping station in Roxbury. 
Most of the sewage of the city of Quincy is pumped into the High- 
level sewer at Greenleaf Street near the Quincy pumping station. 
All of the sewage of the South District is screened at the Nut Island 
screen-house for the purpose of intercepting solid matter, and is 
thence discharged at the bottom of the harbor from the outfalls 
about a mile off the island. 

The daily average amount of sewage thus discharged was 62,000,- 
000 gallons, and the largest rate of discharge in a single day was 
during a heavy storm, when the amount reached 178,000,000 gallons. 
The increase in the daily average from last year was 9,700,000 gal- 
lons. The daily average discharge of sewage for each individual 
contributing sewage in the district was 196 gallons. 

There were 3,753 gross tons of bituminous coal purchased at the 
two pumping stations and the screen-house, the average prices of 
which varied from $5.21 to 35.87 per gross ton delivered in the bins. 

The total amount expended for the operation of the stations was 
870,233.79. 

VII. SEWERAGE WORKS — FINANCIAL STATEMENT. 

The financial abstract of the receipts, expenditures, disbursements, 
assets and liabilities of the Metropolitan Water and Sewerage Board 
for the fiscal year of the Commonwealth ending with November 
30, 1916 was, as stated in connection with the Water Works, pre- 
sented to the General Court in January, in accordance with the 
requirements of chapter 235 of the Acts of the year 1906, and a 
copy of this financial abstract is in part printed as Appendix No. 5. 

The following statement of its financial doings, in relation to the 
Metropolitan Sewerage Works, for the calendar year 1916 is here- 
with presented, in accordance with the provisions of the act of 1906, 
as a part of the annual report of the Board. 

(1) Metropolitan Sewerage Loaxs, Receipts axd Payments. 

The loans authorized for the construction of the Metropolitan 
Sewerage Works, the receipts which are added to the proceeds of 
these loans, the expenditures for construction, and the balances 
available on January 1, 1917, have been as follows: — 



30 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 



North Metropolitan System. 

Loans authorized under various acts prior to 1916 for the con- 
struction of the North Metropolitan System and the various 

extensions, $7,227,365 73 

Loan authorized under General Acts of 1916: — 

Chapter 159 (Reading Extension), ...'... 285,000 00 
Receipts from sales of real estate and from miscellaneous sources 
which are placed to the .credit of the North Metropolitan 
System: — 
For the year ending December 31, 1916, . .. $20132 

For the period prior to January 1, 1916, . . 85,516 79 

- 85,718 11 



$7 ; 598,083 84 



Amount approved for payment by the Board l out of the Metro- 
politan Sewerage Loan Fund, North System: — 

For the year ending December 31, 1916, . . $131,064 39 
For the period prior to January 1, 1916, . . 7,125,637 95 



— 7,256,702 34 

Balance, North Metropolitan System, January 1, 1917, . $341,381 50 

South Metropolitan System. 

Loans authorized under the various acts, prior to 1916, applied to 
the construction of the Charles River valley sewer, Neponset 
valley sewer, High-level sewer and extensions, constituting the 

South Metropolitan System, $9,222,046 27 

Loan authorized under General Acts of 1916: — 

Chapter 93 (Additions to Ward St. Pumping Station Plant). 40,000 00 
Receipts from pumping, sales of real estate and from miscella- 
neous sources, which are placed to the credit of the South 
Metropolitan System:- — 

For the year ending December 31, 1916, . . $230 31 

For the period prior to January 1, 1916, . . 19,070 14 

19,300 45 



1,281,346 72 



A mount carried forward, $9,281,346 72 

1 The word "Board" refers to the Metropolitan Sewerage Commission and the Metropolitan Water 
and Sewerage Board. 



;No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



31 



Amount brought forward, $9,28 1,346 72 

Amount approved by the Board for payment out of the Met- 
ropolitan Sewerage Loan Fund, South System: — 
On account of the Charles River valley sewer, $800,046 27 
On account of the Neponset valley sewer, . 911,531 46 
On account of the High-level sewer and exten- 
sions, including Wellesley extension : ■ — 
For the year ending December 

31, 1916, .... $175,383 44 

For the period prior to January 

1, 1916, 7,232,020 41 

7,407,403 85 

— — — 9,118,981 58 



Balance, South Metropolitan System, January 1, 1917, . $162,365 14 

(2) Total Sewerage Debt, December 31, 1916. 

North Metropolitan System. 

Bonds issued by the Treasurer of the Commonwealth: — 

Sinking fund bonds (3 and 3i per cent.), $6,563,000 00 

Serial bonds (3£ and 4 per cent.), " 640,500 00 



Total bond issue to December 31, 1916, .... 
Serial bonds paid prior to January 1, 1916, . . $29,000 00 
Serial bonds paid-in 1916, 19,500 00 



Total bond issue outstanding December 31, 1916, 



$7,203,500 00 



48,500 00 
$7,155,000 00 



Gross Sewerage Debt, $7,155,000 00 

Sinking fund December 31, 1916, 2,284,055 75 

Net Sewerage Debt December 31, 1916, $4,870,944 25 

A decrease for the year of $138,045.89. 



South Metropolitan System. 

Bonds issued by the Treasurer of the Commonwealth: — 
Sinking fund bonds (3 and 3 J per cent.), . 
Serial bonds, 

Total bond issue to December 31, 1916, 



Gross Sewerage Debt, 

Sinking fund December 31, 1916, 

Net Sewerage Debt December 31, 1916, . 
A net increase for the year of $219,868.08. 



$8,877,912 00 
355,000 00 



59,232,912 00 

19,232,912 00 
1,320,601 52 



$7,912,310 48 



32 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



(3) North and South Metropolitan Loan and Sinking Funds, 

December 31, 1916. 



Year. 


Loans. 


Bonds issued 
(Sinking Fund). 


Bonds issued 
(Serial Bonds). 


Sinking 
Fund. 










1 i 






North 
System. 


South 
System. 


North 

System. 


South 
System. 


North South 
System, i System. 


North and 

South 
Systems. 


18S9, . . . 


$5,000,000 00 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1890, . 






- 


- 


$2,200,000 


$800,000 


- 


- 


- 


1891, . 






- 


- 


368,000 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1892, . 






- 


- 


1.053,000 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1893, . 






- 


- 


579,000 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1894, . 






500,000 00 


- 


500,000 


-• 


- 


- 


- 


1895, . 






300,000 00 


$500,000 00 


300,000 


300,000 


- 


- 


- 


1890, . 






30,000 00 


- 


30,000 


200,000 


- 


- 


- 


1897, . 






85,000 00 


300,000 00 


80,000 


300,000 


- 


- 


- 


1898, . 






215,000 00 


35,000 00 


220,000 


35,000 


- 


- 


• 


1899, . 






- 


4,625,000 00 


- 


1,025,000 


- 


- 


$361,416 59 


1900, . 






265,000 00 


10,912 00i 


265,000 


10,912 


- 


- 


454,520 57 


1901, . 






- 


40,000 00 


- 


2,040,000 


- 


- 


545,668 26 


1902, . 






- 


- 


- 


864,000 


- 


- 


636,084 04 


1903, . 






500,000 00 


1,000,000 00 


500,000 


1,736,000 


- 


- 


754.690 41 


1904, . 






- 


392,000 00 


- 


392,000 


- 


- 


878,557 12 


1905, . 






- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1,008,724 95 


1905, . 






55,000 00 


1.J75.000 00 


55,000 


175,000 


- 


- 


1,140,998 68 


1907, . 






- 


- 


- 


300,000 




- 


1,306,850 30 


1908, . 






413,000 00 


- 


- 


700,000 


- 


- 


1,492,418 98 


1909, . 






- 


- 


300,000 


- 


- 


- 


1,673,784 40 


1910, . 






56,000 00 


- 


113,000 


- 


- 


- 


1,931,741 89 


1911, . 






6,000 00 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


2,184,674 98 


1912, . 






378,000 00 


- 


- 


- 


$62,000 


- 


2,458,541 20 


1913, . 






- 


- 


- 


- 


378,000 


- 


2,749,337 90 


1914, . 






130,500 00 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


3,011,512 44 


1915, . 






83,000 00 


- 


- 


- 


130,500 


- 


3,290,979 46 


1016, . 






285,000 00 


40,000 00 


- 


- 


70,000 


$355,000 


3,604,657 27 




$8,301,500 00 = 


$8,472,912 00 


- 


- 




- 


- 




789,134 27 


789,134 27 


- 


- 




- 


- 








$7,512,365 73 


$9,262,046 27 


$0,563,000 


$8,877,912 


$640,500 


$355,000 


- 



1 The Bum of $10,912 was appropriated to reimburse the town of Watertown for the expense of con- 
structing the Watertown siphon. 

2 Of this amount $789,134.27 was expended for the construction of the Charles River valley sewer, which 
is now included in the South Metropolitan System. 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 33 

(4) Annual Appropriations, Receipts and Expenditures. 
The annual appropriations for the maintenance of the Metropoli- 
tan Sewerage Works, the receipts of the Board which are added to 
the appropriations for maintenance, and the expenditures for main- 
tenance for the year ending December 31, 1916, were as follows: — 

North Metropolitan System. 
Appropriation as follows : — 

Chapter 167, Special Acts of 1916, $180,000 00 

Receipts from pumping and from other sources, .... 1,961 37 

$181,961 37 
Amount approved by the Board for payment, .... 179,784 85 

Balance, January 1, 1917, $2,176 52 

South Metropolitan System. 
Appropriation as follows : — 

Chapter 168, Special Acts of 1916, $115,000 00 

Receipts from pumping and from other sources, .... 527 83 

$115,527 83 
Amount approved by the Board for payment, .... 114,975 93 

Balance, January 1, 1917, $551 90 

(5) Sewer Assessments, 1916. 
The following sewer assessments were made by the Treasurer of 
the Commonwealth upon the various municipalities: — 

, North Metropolitan Setverage System. 

Sinking fund requirements, $110,165 52 

Serial bonds, 13,776 SO 

Interest, 223,534 15 

Maintenance: — 

Appropriated by Legislature, .... $180,000 00 

Less balance on hand, 27,059 76 

152,940 24 

Total North Metropolitan sewerage assessment, . . $500,416 71 



34 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



South Metropolitan Sewerage System. 

Sinking fund requirements, $73,654 37 

Interest, 310,996 95 

Maintenance:' — 

Appropriated by Legislature, .... $115,000 00 
Less balance on hand, 9,167 38 



105,832 62 



Total South Metropolitan sewerage assessment, 



$490,483 94 



In accordance with the provisions of chapter 369, Acts of 1906, 
the proportion to be paid by each city and town to meet the interest 
and sinking fund requirements for each year is based upon their 
respective taxable valuations, and to meet the cost of maintenance 
and operation upon their respective populations. 
«| The divisions of the assessments for 1916 were as follows: — 



North Metropolitan Sewerage System. 



Cities and Towns. 


Assessment. 


Cities and Towns. 


Assessment. 




$14,903 84 

9,705 02 

77,649 17 

109,283 75 

29,394 67 

29,092 57 

5,194 42 

39,086 96 

26,427 50 


Wakefield, 

Total, 


$16,153 54 
19,804 14 
67,511 00 
5,486 60 
10,720 06 
13,892 98 
12,998 10 
13,112 39 




$500,416 71 



South Metropolitan Sewerage System. 



Cities and Towns. 


Assessment. 


Cities and Towns. 


Assessment. 


Boston, 

Brookline 

Dedham, 

Milton, 


$220,679 98 
95,105 55 
11,116 91 
20,839 61 
59,050 56 


Total, 


$32,951 65 
24,241 78 
15,727 66 
10,770 24 


Newton, 


$490,483 94 





No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



35 



(6) Expenditures for the Different Works. 
The following is a summary of the expenditures made in the vari- 
ous operations for the different works: — 



Construction and Acquisition op Works. 



For the Year ending 
December 31, 1916. 



North Metropolitan System. 
North System, enlargement: — 

Administration, 

New Mystic sewer, 

Section 57A, Revere extension, . . . . .... 

Deer Island Outfall extension, 

Maiden River siphon, Section 19, 

Removal of old Maiden River siphon, 

Reading extension, . 

Amount charged from beginning of work to January 1, 1916, 

Total for North Metropolitan System to January 1, 1917, 

South Metropolitan System. 
High-level sewer, . . . . . . . . . 

High-level sewer extensions: — 

Administration, . 

Relief Outfall, Section 43, . . . 

Wellesley extension: — 

Section 98,. . . . $11,883 83 

Section 99 2,388 68 

Section 100 967 29 

Section 101 527 45 

Section 102, 16,714 45 

Section 103, 37,418 46 

Section 104 63,539 07 

Section 105 9,493 78 

Section 106 23,263 33 

Legal, etc 302 77 

Additions to Ward Street pumping station plant, 

Amount charged from beginning of work to January 1, 1916, 
Total for South Metropolitan System to January 1, 1917, 
Total for construction, both systems 



$2,476 50 




2,237 49 




15 85 




84,139 60 




30,429 81 




7,625 86 




4,139 28 




• 


$131,064 39 






7,125,637 95 


$7,256,702 34 



$30 00 



$3,705 34 
5,055 85 



166,499 11 
93 14 


175,353 44 




$175,383 44 
8,943,598 14 


$9,118,981 58 
$16,375,683 92 



Maintenance and Operation. 


For the Year ending 
December 31, 1916. 




$179,784 85 
114,975 93 




$294,760 78 



36 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



(7) Detailed Financial Statement. 

The Board herewith presents, in accordance with the Metropolitan 
Sewerage acts, an abstract of the expenditures and disbursements, re- 
ceipts, assets and liabilities for the year ending December 31, 1916: — 



(a) Expenditures and Disbursements. 



General Character op Expenditures. 



For the Year ending 
December 31, 1916. 



Construction op Works and Acquisition bt Purchase or Taking. 
North System Enlargement. 
Administration: — 

Commissioners, 

Secretary, 

Clerks and stenographers, . 

Traveling expenses, 

Stationery, printing and office supplies 

Telephone, lighting, heating, water and care of building, .... 
Rent and taxes, main office, 

Engineering: — 

Chief engineer, 

Engineering assistants, 

Inspectors 

Traveling expenses, 

Stationery, printing and office supplies, 

Engineering and drafting instruments and tools, . 

Engineering and drafting supplies, 

Telephone, lighting, heating, water and care of building, .... 

Bent and taxes, 

Miscellaneous expenses 

Advertising, 

Labor and teaming, 

Tools, machinery and appliances, 

Brick, cement, lumber and other field supplies and expenses, 

Contracts: — 
Boston Dredging Co., Contract 137, for removal of old Maiden River siphon 

between Everett and Medford, 

George M. Bryne, Contract 132, for reconstruction of Maiden River siphon 

between Everett and Medford, 

George M. Bryne, Contract 131, for constructing Section 1A of the Deer 

Island Temporary Outfall extension, 

United States Cast Iron Pipe and Foundry Co., Contract 130, for furnishing 

castings for the Deer Island Outfall sewer extension in Boston Harbor, 
Roy H. Beattie Inc., Contract 135, for constructing Section 1 of the Deer 

Island Outfall sewer extension in Boston Harbor, *..... 

Real estate: — 

Legal, conveyancing and expert, 

Settlements, 

Total for North Metropolitan System, 



$966 66 




375 00 




716 97 




57 




168 44 


, 


134 59 




114 27 


$2,476 50 




$1,875 00 




6,367 49 




3,351 05 




557 05 




200 41 




107 18 




64 84 




403 85 




342 83 




106 95 


13,376 65 




$63 00 




2,801 25 




396 91 




4,215 70 


7,476 86 


$6,950 00 


26,039 85 




34,912 92 




17,245 98 




20,540 42 


105,689 17 




$45 21 




2,000 00 


2,045 21 




$131,064 39 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



37 



General Character op Expenditures. 



For the Year ending 
December 31, 1916. 



South Metropolitan System. 
High-level Sewer. 
Engineering: — 
Rent of office, Ashburton Place, 

High-level Sewer Extensions. 
Administration: — 

Commissioners, 

Secretary, .... 

Clerks and stenographers, 

Traveling expenses, 

Stationery, printing and office supplies, 

Telephone, lighting, heating, water and care of building, . . 

Rent and taxes, main office, 

Miscellaneous expenses, 

Engineering: — 

Chief engineer 

Engineering assistants 

Inspectors 

Traveling expenses, 

Engineering and drafting instruments and tools, 

Stationery, printing and office supplies, 

Engineering and drafting supplies 

Telephone, lighting, heating, water and care of building, .... 

Rent and taxes, main office, 

Miscellaneous expenses, 

Advertising 

Labor and teaming, 

Tools, machinery and appliances, 

Brick, cement, lumber and other field supplies and expenses, 

Contracts: — 
W. H. Ellis & Son Co., Contract 120, for constructing part of Section 43, 

Relief Outfall line of the High-level sewer in Boston Harbor, 
Hugh Nawn Contracting Co., Contract 123, for constructing Section 106 of 

the High-level sewer (Wellesley extension) in Needham, 
Hugh Nawn Contracting Co., Contract 124, for constructing Section 105 of 

the High-level sewer (Wellesley extension) in Needham, 
Bay State Dredging and Contracting Co., Contract 133, for constructing 

Section 104 of the High-level sewer (Wellesley extension) in Needham, 
Bruno & Petitti, Contract 134, for constructing Section 103 of the High-level 

sewer (Wellesley extension) in Needham, 

Bruno & Petitti, Contract 143, for constructing Section 102 of the High-level 

sewer (Wellesley extension) in Needham, 

George M. Bryne, under agreement dated October 23, 1916, for constructing 

Section 98 of the High-level sewer (Wellesley extension) in West Rox- 

bury and Dedham, 

Real estate: — 
Legal, conveyancing and expert, 

Total for South Metropolitan System, 



$30 00 



$1,416 67 


375 00 


1,238 63 


27 85 


288 42 


193 04 


155 73 


10 00 


$750 00 


9,905 79 


7,233 82 


725 19 


175 34 


712 76 


166 70 


579 22 


467 23 


572 74 


$195 81 


3,699 44 


426 83 


5,931 66 


$5,055 85 


20,488 05 


11,665 09 


51,447 48 


31,173 72 


13,186 47 



6,786 14 



$30 00 



3,705 34 



21,288 79 



10,253 74 



139,802 80 

302 77 
$175,383 44 



38 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



General Character of Expenditures. 



For the Year ending 
December 31, 1916. 



Maintenance and Operation of Works. 
North Metropolitan System. 
Administration: — 

Commissioners, 

Secretary and assistants, 

Rent, 

Heating, lighting and care of building, 

Repairs of building, 

Postage, 

Printing, stationery and office supplies, 

Telephones, 

Traveling expenses, 

Miscellaneous expenses, 

General supervision: — 

Chief engineer and assistants, 

Rent 

Heating, lighting and care of building, 

Repairs of building, 

Postage, 

Printing, stationery and office supplies, 

Telephones, 

Traveling expenses, 

Deer Island pumping station: — 

Labor, 

Fuel 

Oil and waste, 

Water, 

Packing, 

Repairs and renewals, 

Telephones, 

General supplies, 

Miscellaneous supplies and expenses, .... 

East Boston pumping station: — 

Labor, 

Fuel, 

Oil and waste, 

Water, 

Packing, 

Repairs and renewals, 

Telephones, t 

General supplies, 

Miscellaneous supplies and expenses, .... 

Charlestown pumping station: — 

Labor 

Fuel, 

Oil and waste, 

Water 

Amounts carried forward, 



$2,533 34 

2,789 50 

293 85 

289 84 

3 02 

40 00 

516 12 

47 64 

50 00 

46 90 



$4,514 59 
881 55 
869 62 
9 08 
20 00 
148 11 
142 94 
125 00 



$20,068 00 

16,618 91 

466 12 

1,291 20 

140 16 

1,198 53 

25 85 

583 67 

441 88 



$20,453 27 

13,843 92 

520 23 

1,727 20 

67 77 

1,177 23 

5 80 

573 52 

432 53 



$17,105 67 

5,890 02 

226 91 

513 60 



$6,610 21 



6,710 89- 



40,834 32" 



38,801 47 



$23,736 20 $92,956 89' 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



39 



General Character op Expenditures. 



For the Year ending 
December 31, 1916. 



Amounts brought forward, 

North Metropolitan System — Con. 
Charlestown pumping station — Con. 

Packing, . 

Repairs and renewals, . 

Telephones, 

General supplies, 

Miscellaneous supplies and expenses, 

Alewife Brook pumping station: — 

Labor, 

Fuel 

Oil and waste, 

Water, 

Packing, 

Repairs and renewals, . . . . . . • 

Telephones, 

General supplies, 

Miscellaneous supplies and expenses 

Sewer lines, buildings and grounds: — 

Engineering assistants, 

Labor, 

Brick, cement and lime, 

Castings, ironwork and metals 

Fuel and lighting, 

Jobbing and repairing, . . . . . . - 

Lumber, 

Machinery, tools and appliances, ... . . . 

Paints and oils, 

Rubber and oiled goods, 

Sand, gravel and stone, 

Telephones, 

Traveling expenses . 

General supplies, 

Miscellaneous expenses, 

Horses, vehicles and stable account, 

Payments under Industrial Accident Law and special benefit appropriations, 

Total for North Metropolitan System, 



$23,736 20 $92,956 



36 30 
243 48 

60 75 
231 85 
294 68 



$8,741 22 

2,929 46 

223 18 

245 04 

16 03 

47 06 

47 71 

112 72 

70 02 



$2,475 00 

33,313 29 

285 30 

329 17 

90 33 

326 26 

989 80 

1,284 55 

523 29 

343 06 

288 17 

70 49 

369 60 

1,100 64 

347 90 



24,603 26 



12,432 44 



42,136 85 
4,554 41 
3,101 00 

$179,784 85 



40 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



General Character of Expenditures. 



For the Year ending 
December 31, 1916. 



South Metropolitan System. 
Administration: — 

Commissioners 

Secretary and assistants, 

Rent, 

Heating, lighting and care of building, 

Postage, 

Printing, stationery and office supplies, 

Telephones 

Traveling expenses, 

Miscellaneous expenses, 

General supervision: — 
Chief engineer and assistants, .... 

Kent, 

Heating, lighting and care of building, . 
Printing, stationery and office supplies, 
Telephones, ........ 

Traveling expenses, . . . . 

Miscellaneous expenses, 

Ward Street pumping station: — 

Labor, 

Fuel 

Oil and waste, 

Water, 

Packing, 

Repairs and renewals 

Telephones, 

General supplies, 

Miscellaneous supplies and expenses, . 

Quincy pumping station: — 

Labor, 

Fuel 

Oil and waste, 

Water, 

Packing, 

Repairs and renewals, 

Telephones, 

General suppUes, 

Miscellaneous supplies and expenses, . 

Nut Island screen-house: — 

Labor, 

Fuel, 

Oil and waste, 

Water, 

Packing, 

Repairs and renewals 

Amounts carried forward, 



$1,808 33 


2,044 94 


212 21 


173 74 


40 00 


458 83 


26 12 


38 50 


44 20 




$4,854 66 


636 69 


521 35 


305 73 


78 36 


50 00 


18 00 




$22,012 59 


11,742 83 


301 83 


1,490 40 


245 18 


4,064 68 


38 24 


1,099 12 


365 32 




$8,340 39 


5,069 70 


71 24 


298 95 


40 51 


362 89 


46 40 


331 68 


43 09 

1 A fifW S"i 




$8,710 04 


4,006 46 


90 79 


489 26 


54 28 


70 32 


$13,421 15 $67,276 70 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



41 



General Character of Expenditures. 



For the Year ending 
December 31, 1916. 



Amounts brought forward, 

South Metropolitan System — Con 
Nut Island screen-house — Con. 

Telephones, 

General supplies, 

Miscellaneous supplies and expenses, 

Sewer lines, buildings and grounds: — 

Engineering assistants, 

Labor, 

Automobiles, 

Brick, cement and lime, 

Castings, ironwork and metals 

Fuel and lighting, 

Jobbing and repairing, . ... 

Lumber, 

Machinery, tools and appliances, .... 

Paints and oils, 

Rubber and oiled goods, 

Sand, gravel and stone, 

Telephones, . . 

Traveling expenses, 

General supplies, 

Miscellaneous expenses 

City of Boston, for pumping and interest, 
Horses, vehicles and stable account, 

Total for South Metropolitan System, 



$13,421 15 $67,276 70 



58 65 
628 14 
160 81 



$3,375 00 

17,776 62 

471 55 

27 91 

39 91 
95 75 

357 37 
525 96 
70 80 
104 72 
115 88 

40 07 
42 55 

204 50 
263 17 
355 10 



14,268 75 



23,866 86 
6,423 73 
3,139 89 

$114,975 93 



(6) Receipts. 

The receipts from the sales of property, from rents and from other 
sources, have been credited as follows: — 



ACCOTTNT. 



For the 

Year ending 

December 31, 

1916. 



Construction: — 

North Metropolitan System, 

South Metropolitan System, 

Maintenance: — 

North Metropolitan System, 

South Metropolitan System, 

Amount credited from beginning of work to January 1, 1916, 
Total receipts to January 1, 1917 



$201 32 
230 31 

1,961 37 
527 83 



$2,920 83 
126.72S 27 



$129,649 10 



42 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



(c) Assets. 
The following is an abstract of the assets of the Sewerage Works, 
a complete schedule of which is kept on file in the office of the 
Board: — 

Office furniture, fixtures and supplies; engineering and scientific instruments 
and supplies; horses, vehicles, field machinery, etc.; machinery, tools and 
other appliances and supplies; completed works, real estate connected there- 
with. 

(d) Liabilities. 

There are bills for current expenses which have not yet been 
received. 

Amounts on Monthly Estimates, not due until Completion of Contracts or until 

Claims are settled. 





Name. 


Work. 


Amount. 


High-level sewer : — 






National Contracting Co., 


Section 73, Contract abandoned, .... 


$5,516 17 i 


High-level sewer extensions: — 






Timothy J. O'Connell, . 


Contract 57, Section 82, in part, .... 


60 00 


W. H. Ellis & Son Co., . 


Contract 120, Section 43, in part, Relief Outfall line, 


200 00 


Bruno & Petitti, .... 


Contract 134, Section 103, Wellesley extension, . 


5,501 25 


Bay State Dredging and Contracting 

Co. 
Bruno <fe Petitti, .... 


Contract 133, Section 104, Wellesley extension, . 


3,196 61 


Contract 143, Section 102, Wellesley extension, . 


2,327 03 


North System enlargement: — 






George M. Bryne, .... 
Roy H. Beattie, Inc., 


Contract 131, Section 1A, Deer Island Temporary 
Outfall. 

Contract 135, Section 1, Deer Island Outfall exten- 
sion. 


6,655 09 
3,624 78 



1 Damages claimed by the Commonwealth on account of the abandonment of the contract exceed 
this amount. 



Settlements are pending with the following parties for easements 
taken in lands owned by them : — 

Isabella P. Shaw, Arthur W. Pope, F. Murray Forbes, Hugh D. 
Scott, Mabel H. Foster, Walker-Gordon Laboratory Co., Charles H. 
Harmon, New York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad, heirs of 
John Defren, J. W. Battelle, Clifford M. Locke, Martha W. Bur- 
rage, Quinobequin Canoe Association, Needham Tire Co., Anne 
B. Richardson, Leslie B. Cutler, Anne Williams, John Wells Farley, 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 43 

I. Tucker Burr, Jr., Edward and Catherine Bingham, Hannah 
Bingham, Katherine H. Rooney, Mary A. Read, J. Austin Amory, 
Hannah E. Pond, Richard G. Wadsworth, Charles Philip Beebe, 
John T. Morse, Jr., Mary A. Sidney, Frank P. Chase. 

VIII. RECOMMENDATIONS FOR LEGISLATION. 

In the abstract of the annual report for the year 1916 the Board 
made the following statement and recommendations: — 

On account of the high price of labor and materials, resulting from the unusual 
business conditions that have prevailed during the past year, a large portion of 
the construction work already authorized has been deferred with the hope of 
carrying out the projects under more favorable conditions. 

Plans and specifications were prepared and proposals were received on July 24 
for the work of improving Beaver Dam Brook. As the lowest bid received for 
this work was $49,732.50, or about $18,000 in excess of the funds available for 
the project, the proposals were all rejected. If this work is to be done during 
the present year an additional appropriation of at least $30,000 should be 
made to cover the expense. 

On June 9 bids were received for the cast-iron water pipes and specials required 
for the proposed extensions of the Distribution System for the Lexington and 
Milton extra high services and for the proposed connections and relocation of 
meters in Brookline and Somerville, but on account of the high prices, only the 
materials required for the work in connection with the relocation of the meters 
were purchased. A portion of this work for which the materials were purchased 
was done during the year and it is the intention to complete it early in 1917. 

If the proposed extensions of the Distribution System for the Lexington and 
Milton extra high services are made this year it is very probable that the cost 
will exceed the amount appropriated for the work, but it does not appear to be 
feasible accurately to estimate the probable cost of the work in advance of the 
receipt of actual proposals. 

The amount appropriated for the construction of the Wachusett-Sudbury 
transmission line is not sufficient to cover the cost of construction at the pre- 
vailing prices, but under the agreement which has been made for the sale of the 
electric energy at the Wachusett power station the construction of the trans- 
mission line can be deferred until next year. 

During the past year the question of abandoning the East Boston reservoir 
and, using the land for park purposes has been seriously considered by the City 
of Boston. If this action should be authorized by the city government it would, 
in the opinion of the Board, be desirable to lay a, new 36-inch main about 1,800 
feet in length in Chelsea to reinforce the existing East Boston supply main 
before the reservoir is abandoned. The estimated cost of this line was $18,000 
in 1915. If this line is to be constructed this year an appropriation of at least 
$25,000 should be available for the purpose. 

There is a balance of $46,000 now remaining from the appropriation of 



44 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

$600,000 authorized by chapter 694 of the Acts of 1912 for the purchase of cer- 
tain property from the City of Boston, and in view of the uncertainty regarding 
the cost of construction work at the present time and the possibility that the 
new main may be required for the East Boston service, the Board recommends 
that authority be given to use this balance for the construction of the 36-inch 
main for the East Boston service and for the increased cost of the works author- 
ized under chapter 172 of the General Acts of the year 1916, due to the present 
increase in cost of labor and materials. 

The original estimate for the construction of the Wellesley Extension, High- 
level sewer, of $350,000 was made by the State Board of Health, and was based 
on a report submitted by an engineer called in by that Department to make a 
survey and estimate. Two lines were considered by the Board of Health. The 
estimate was made on the shorter line which came through the location of the 
Brookline Water Works fields. This line was to connect with the existing Nepon- 
set Valley Sewer of the High-level System at a point where the sewer has a 
capacity suitable only for the original district for which it was built. 

Because of the small size of this existing Metropolitan sewer and the fact that 
this line extended across the Brookline Water Works fields and would interfere 
with this important supply, and also because of the fact that there is a rapidly 
growing portion of Dedham in the vicinity of Bridge Street which is a part of the 
Metropolitan District and has no possible means of reaching the Metropolitan 
System excepting by construction work by the Metropolitan Water and Sewer- 
age Board, it was decided to use the alternate line proposed by the State Board 
of Health. This is somewhat longer but reaches the existing Metropolitan 
sewer at a point where the latter is of increased size and at the same time fur- 
nishes a means of outlet for the above-named portion of Dedham and obviates 
the difficulties in connection with our construction in the fields of the Brookline 
Water Works. 

The Board also has designed a sewer of considerably larger capacity than was 
anticipated by the State Board of Health, feeling that the same is justified by 
the future demands of the District. 

The fine adopted has a length of about 40,000 feet almost wholly through 
private lands. It has been divided into sections numbered from 98 to 106, 
inclusive. At the present time sections 103, 104, 105 and 106 are wholly com- 
pleted. Section 102 is under contract and about one-fourth completed. Sec- 
tion 98 is under construction with but a small amount of the work completed. 

The natural physical conditions in this part of the Charles River valley make 
sewer construction very expensive. This is occasioned by the large amount of 
rock encountered and by fine sands and other material in which it is expensive 
to construct and by the remoteness of the location. 

Because of the above-stated conditions, namely, insufficiency of the original 
appropriation, not based on estimates made by the Metropolitan Water and 
Sewerage Board, and the necessary changes in the location to fit the needs of the 
District, the bad material encountered and, above all, the abnormal conditions 
of the market in regard to labor and supplies, it is necessary that an additional 
appropriation be asked for to complete the work. 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



45 



Following is the cost of the completed sections with an estimate of the cost 
of the remaining ones : — 

Total Cost of Sections 98 to 106, inclusive (excluding Land Damages). 



Section. 



Cost. 



Length (Feet). 



106, 
105, 
104, 
103, 
102, 
101, 
100, 
99, 
98, 



$43,000 
44,000 
70,000' 
45,000 
71,000= 
75,0002 
85,0002 
90,0002 
90,000= 



Administration, 

Total estimated cost, 



S613.000 
10,000 



§623,000 



4,355 
4,425 
4,300 
5,916 
6,851 
3,950 
3,700 
3,300 
3,350 



40,147 



Approximately. 



2 Estimated. 



showing that the probable cost of construction work on this line will amount 
to $623,000 including engineering and incidentals. To this must be added the 
cost of land damage and any settlements of outstanding claims by contractors. 
The Board, therefore, asks for an additional appropriation of $325,000. 

Since filing the annual estimates substantial increases in com- 
pensation to wage earners performing work of a similar character to 
that required of the workmen, laborers and mechanics in the employ 
of the Board have been granted. In view of these increases and the 
unusual conditions now prevailing, the Board believes that the 
wages of the employees in the water and sewerage pumping stations 
and others engaged in the care and maintenance of the water and 
sewerage works should be increased, and it respectfully recommends 
that additional appropriations be made providing for such increases. 

If such increases are authorized the sums required, in addition 
to the amounts already appropriated for the year 1917, will be as 
follows: — 

Metropolitan Water Works, $24,000 

Metropolitan Sewerage Works, North System, 10,500 

Metropolitan Sewerage Works, South System, 6,500 



46 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

The detailed reports of the Chief Engineer of the Water Works 
and of the Chief Engineer of the Sewerage Works, with various 
tables and statistics, are herewith presented. 

Respectfully submitted, 

henry p. walcott, 
edward a. Mclaughlin, 
thomas e. dwyer, 

Metropolitan Water and Sewerage Board. 
Boston, February 23, 1917. 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



47 



EEPOET OF CHIEF ENGINEEE OF WATER WORKS. 



To the Metropolitan Water and Sewerage Board. 

Gentlemen: — I have the honor to submit the annual report of 
the work done under the direction of the Chief Engineer of Water 
Works in connection with the construction, maintenance and opera- 
tion of the Metropolitan Water Works for the year ended December 
31, 1916. 

Organization. 

The organization of the force employed under the direction of 
the Chief Engineer remained the same as at the close of the pre- 
vious year until November 1, 1916, when Mr. John L. Howard, 
who had formerly been employed in the department, from 1895 to 
1903, was appointed as Assistant to the Chief Engineer. The prin- 
cipal assistants employed at the close of the year were as follows: — 



John L. Howard, . 
Elliot R. B. Allardice, 
Charles E. Haberstroh, 
Samuel E. Killam, 



Arthur E. O'Neil, 

Alfred 0. Doane, 

William W. Locke, 
Clifford Foss, . 



Benjamin F. Hancox, 
James W. Killam, . 



William E. Whittaker, 
Charles E. Livermore, 



Assistant to the Chief Engineer. 

Superintendent of Wachusett Department. 

Superintendent of Sudbury Department. 

Superintendent of Distribution Pipe Lines and 
Reservoirs. 

Superintendent of Distribution Pumping Sta- 
tions. 

Division Engineer, in charge of Mechanical 
Engineering and Inspection Work. 

Sanitary Inspector. 

Assistant Engineer in charge of Construction 
Work. 

Head Draftsman. 

Assistant Engineer in charge of Coal and Oil 
Testing and maintenance of Recording 
Pressure Gages. 

Office Assistant. 

Biologist. 



48 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



Including these principal assistants the number of supervising, 
engineering and clerical employees has averaged 45 during the year. 

In addition to the above force the number of employees engaged 
in maintaining and operating the reservoirs, aqueducts, pipe lines, 
hydro-electric stations and pumping stations and doing minor con- 
struction work has been as follows: — 





Department. 


Beginning 
of Year. 


End of 
Year. 


Maximum. 


Average. 


Distribution, pipe lines and reservoirs, 
Distribution, pumping stations, .... 


45 

58 
80 
55 


42 
57 

78 
56 


74 
77 
97 
58 


56 
61 
85 
56 




238 


233 


306 


258 



CONSTRUCTION. 

Completion of 60-inch Weston Aqueduct Supply Main. 

At the beginning of the year the 60-inch Weston Aqueduct Supply 
Main, authorized under chapter 320 of the Acts of the year 1909, 
was nearly completed, only 144 feet of pipe line remaining to be 
laid in Commonwealth Avenue, in Newton. This work was com- 
pleted on January 13, but the work of resurfacing the street over 
the pipe trench was carried on intermittently by the city of Newton 
until February, when it was suspended on account of bad weather. 
The work was resumed April 1 and completed in August. 

The expenditures for this work during the year 1916 amount to 
$26,354.15 and the total expenditures for the pipe line since the 
work was begun in 1909 amount to $707,363.07. 



Improvement of Beaver Dam Brook. 
The plans and specifications for the improvement of Beaver Dam 
Brook, which is a tributary of Lake Cochituate located in the towns 
of Ashland, Framingham, Sherborn and Natick, were completed 
and proposals for the work were received from contractors on July 
24. The appropriation for this work, which was authorized by 
chapter 814 of the Acts of the year 1913, is $33,000, and as all of 
the proposals received exceeded the appropriation they were rejected. 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 49 

Additional 24-inch Main from Dorchester Lower Mills to 

Quincy. 
At the beginning of the year this main was completed with the 
exception of the box to protect from frost the 24-inch steel pipe 
which is suspended from the bridge over the Neponset River. 
During the year the box was framed at the carpenter shop at the 
Chestnut Hill pipe yard and given a coat of paint and during 
August and September was erected about the pipe. The cost of 
the work was $464.17 which, with the miscellaneous payments on 
account of the pipe line during the year, makes a total of $1,153.19. 

Bellevue Reservoir. 

At the beginning of the year the southern extra high-service 
reservoir on Bellevue Hill in West Roxbury had been completed, 
with the exception of laying the asphalt and tile on the roof and 
the granolithic floor between the steel tank and the masonry wall 
and of finishing the pipe connections and the grading around the 
tower. 

The work on the masonry tower, under the contract with John 
Cashman & Sons Company, was continued during favorable weather 
until the roof was completed on March 18. The granolithic floor 
was laid, the painting completed and the stone masonry cleaned 
down with a sand blast during May and June and the entire work 
was completed on July 11. 

The old steel tank and wooden tower constructed at this place 
by the city of Boston in 1886 was removed by the city after the 
new reservoir was completed. The pipe connections and the grad- 
ing were completed by the department force during the latter part 
of the year. 

The expenditures for this project during the year amounted to 
$16,374.27, making the total cost of the reservoir $87,769.18, which 
is subdivided as follows: — 

Foundation, $11,096 04 

Steel tank, . . 17,221 58 

Tower, 46,659 14 

Grading and miscellaneous, , . . . . 1,545 82 

Engineering, 11,246 60 

$87,769 IS 



,50 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 



Sudbury Power Plant. 

The work of constructing the hydro-electric plant at the Sudbury 
Dam in Southborough, which was begun in June, 1915, has been 
continued throughout the year 1916 and with the exception of a 
few unimportant details is now completed. A description of this 
plant was given in the previous annual report. 

At the beginning of the year 1916 the hydraulic turbines and 
electric generators had been built and tested and the w r ork of enlarg- 
ing the wells of the existing gate-house for use as wheel pits and of 
constructing the surge tanks had been finished. 

The three large double-leaf sluice gates, each 11 feet 2 inches 
high by 5 feet 6 inches wide, for controlling the flow of water from 
the reservoir to the turbines, were installed in February and the 
three electrically driven ball-bearing gate stands for operating the 
gates were installed in March. On account of the requirements of 
the hydro-electric service a similar gate stand was installed for 
operating the existing mid-depth sluice gate, which is 5 feet 3 inches 
high by 3 feet 3 inches wide and was formerly operated by hand. 
This gate is now used for controlling the flow through the low-level 
inlet to the 30-inch turbine. The double-leaf sluice gates and the 
gate stands were furnished and installed by the Coffin Valve Com- 
pany of Neponset. 

In February the Safety Insulated Wire & Cable Company fur- 
nished and installed about 1,550 linear feet of 3-conductor 15,000- 
volt underground cable in two lines between the power station and 
the lightning arrester chamber. These cables were successfully 
tested in place on May 24 and 26 under a pressure of 30,000 volts 
by the Testing Department of the Edison Electric Illuminating 
Company of Boston. 

The lightning arrester chamber was built in an existing store 
house at the northerly end of the dam. It was formed by carrying 
up the exterior granite walls at the northwesterly corner of the store 
house and building concrete interior partition walls to form a fire- 
proof tower about seven feet square with a concrete roof. The over- 
head high-tension wires are brought in through Thomas roof in- 
sulators and the underground cables are brought up through the 
floor. A high wooden fence with barbed wire strung on outriggers 




Sectional Elevation 



HYDRO - ELECTRIC PLANT - SUDBURY DAM 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 51 

at the top has been constructed around the chamber to safeguard 
the public. . 

The overhead transmission line was constructed by the depart- 
ment force and was completed during the latter part of April. It is 
4,170 feet in length and extends easterly from the lightning arrester 
chamber to the connection with the Edison Electric Illuminating 
Company's line in Brewer Road at the Framingham-Southborough 
boundary line. It consists of three conductors of No. 2 stranded 
semi-hard drawn bare copper wire strung on 42 chestnut poles with 
Thomas 25,000-volt porcelain insulators, lee pins and galvanized 
steel cross-arms of the wishbone type, and a 7 strand galvanized 
steel ground wire f of an inch in diameter is supported by bayonets 
on top of the poles and grounded at intervals of about 500 feet. 

The S. Morgan Smith Company delivered the hydraulic machinery 
at the power station in the latter part of January and proceeded 
with its erection until early in March when the work had progressed 
' as far as it was desirable to carry it without having the electric 
generators to connect with. On account of delay of the Westing- 
house Electric & Manufacturing Company in delivering the electric 
equipment the generators were not received until May 6. Their 
erection was then begun and the installation of the hydraulic ma- 
chinery was resumed on May 25. 

During the latter part of June the S. Morgan Smith Company 
completed the installation of the two 24-inch and the 30-inch tur- 
bines which it furnished and of the three hydraulic governors fur- 
nished by the Commonwealth, and the Westinghouse Electric & 
Manufacturing Company completed the installation of the two 
275 and one 900 kilo-volt-ampere capacity generators and began 
work on the switchboard. 

On August 25 the machinery was started and operated without 
load. During the following week the electric apparatus was dried 
out and was put under full voltage on August 31. The units operate 
at a speed of 360 revolutions per minute and deliver 3-phase 60- 
cycle alternating current at a pressure of 2,400 volts, which is stepped 
up to 13,200 volts for transmission. 

In attempting to repair a defect in one of the 750 kilo-volt-ampere 
transformers the cast-iron base was cracked and a new case was not 
received until late in November. The plant was put into regular 



52 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

service, however, on September 14 and energy was delivered up to 
the capacity of the single transformer until the second transformer 
was put into service on November 27. Since that date all of the 
water drawn for supplying the District has been utilized for the 
development of electric energy, which has been sold to the Edison 
Electric Illuminating Company of Boston under a contract which 
provides for the purchase of all of the electric energy generated at 
this station for a period of five years from January 1, 1917. 

The department force installed the electrolytic lightning arrester 
equipment furnished by the Westinghouse Electric & Manufacturing 
Company, also the ground plates for the arrester and for the electric 
equipment at the power station. This force also installed about 620 
linear feet of iron conduit, which is embedded in the power station 
floor, for the station wiring, and put in the wires for the station 
lighting and for the power circuits for operating the sluice gates, 
governor oil pump and station water supply pump. An air inlet was 
constructed in the southerly wall of the station below the floor and 
fitted with a grating and damper so that the amount of air admitted 
to cool the generators may be regulated from the power station floor 
by means of a rod attached to the damper. Removable iron grating 
subfloors have been constructed in the wells under the generators 
for use in making inspections of the machinery and piping. 

For the protection of the plant in case of fire the two large station 
transformers, w T hich together contain about 2,080 gallons of oil, have 
been provided with quick opening oil drain valves connected by a 
line of 3-inch pipe to a large steel storage tank 14 feet 6 inches long 
and 5 feet in diameter coated on the interior with special oil-proof 
paint and buried in the ground outside of the station. In case of 
emergency the transformer oil drain valves can be instantly opened 
by operating levers near the switchboard which will allow the oil to 
flow quickly from the transformers into the storage tank. The drain 
piping is also arranged so that the oil in the transformer cases may 
be pumped through a filter press for purification when necessary. 

The expenditures for the plant during the year amount to $46,- 
175.84 and the total expenditures to the close of the year amount 
to $97,108.35. The cost of the plant, including reserves retained 
under contracts and other amounts not yet paid is $100,881.52, 
subdivided as follows: — 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 53 

Foundations, wheel pits and surge tanks, $46,906 14 

Hydraulic turbines (1,600 horse power), . . . ... 13,41095 

Hydraulic governors, . . . . , . . . 2,516 06 

Electric equipment (1,450 kilo-volt-amperes), 20,859 76 

Transmission line (1,550 feet underground, in 2 lines), . . . 1,714 50 

Transmission line (4,170 feet overhead), 1,914 54 

Lightning arrester chamber, . 1,175 17 

Station floor, wiring, water supply, plumbing and furnishings, . 1 291 71 

Hand travelling crane, 880 00 

Engineering and inspection, . 10,212 69 

$100,881 52 

Wachusett-$tjdbury Transmission Line. 

The preliminary work for the Wachusett-Sudbury transmission 
line was begun immediately after the acceptance, on September 25, 
of the joint proposal of the New England Power Company and the 
Edison Electric Illuminating Company of Boston for the purchase 
of all the electric energy to be generated at the Wachusett power 
station for' a period of ten years from the completion of the proposed 
high-tension transmission line from the Wachusett power station in 
Clinton to the Sudbury power station in Southborough. 

The transmission line will be about 16 miles in length and, with 
the exception of the steel towers required for several long spans 
which are necessary at certain points, the line will be suspended 
from chestnut poles about three-fourths of which will be cut from the 
standing timber on the water works lands surrounding the Wachusett 
Reservoir. A force of several men was engaged for three weeks in 
cutting and peeling the chestnut trees and 177 poles 40 to 50 feet 
in length were cut and taken out to the roadsides where they were 
skidded up ready for transportation to the points w T here they will be 
used. The cost of this work has averaged $2.25 per pole. 

The preliminary engineering and field work required in connection 
with the preparation of the plans and profiles of the transmission 
line has been completed. The total expenditures for the line amount 
to $1,014.45. 

Additional Northern Extra High-service 'Pipe Line and 

Pumping Machinery. 

Under chapter 172 of the General Acts of the year 1916 provision 
was made for a 16-inch pipe line to extend from the northern extra 



54 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

high-service standpipe in Arlington to the Lexington boundary line, 
a distance of about 6,000 feet. Provision was also made under this 
chapter for additions to the pumping machinery at the northern 
extra high-service pumping station in Arlington. 

The present supply for Lexington is furnished from the Arlington 
standpipe through the local pipe lines belonging to the town of 
Arlington, which are used jointly by the Metropolitan Water Works 
and the town. In times of maximum consumption this service is 
not entirely satisfactory and the proposed 16-inch supply main is 
to be constructed to remedy this condition. 

The preliminary plans for the proposed pipe line were prepared 
early in the summer and proposals were received for the cast-iron 
pipes and special castings required, but none was accepted because 
of the high prices. The contract plans for the pipe line have been 
completed but as the work is not extremely urgent it has been de- 
ferred until it can be done under more economical conditions. 

The proposed improvements at the northern extra high-service 
pumping station include the installation of a steam driven centrif- 
ugal pumping unit with a capacity of 3,000,000 gallons in 24 hours, 
a return tubular boiler 54 inches in diameter x 17 feet in length, 
similar to the two boilers now in use, and the enlargement of the 
coal pocket. The plans and specifications for this work were nearly 
completed at the close of the year. 

The total expenditures for the improvements in the northern extra 
high-service works during the year amount to S202.86. 

Southern Extra High-service Pipe Line. 

Chapter 172 of the General Acts of the year 1916 also provides 
for the construction of a 12-inch southern extra high-service pipe 
line approximately 2,050 feet in length in Poplar Street, West Rox- 
bury, and a duplicate 12-inch submerged pipe line about 360 feet in 
length for the Neponset River crossing at West Street in Hyde Park. \) 

Preliminary plans have been prepared for these pipe lines which 
are to be constructed to provide more reliable service for the south- 
ern extra high-service districts in Hyde Park and Milton, but on 
account of the high price of cast-iron pipes and specials this work 
has also been deferred until it can be done under more favorable 
conditions. 

The total expenditures for this work amount to SI 36.59. 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 55 



Meters and' Connections. 

As a result of the purchase in August, 1913, of the Boston Water 
Works supply mains located in Brookline and Somerville it has 
become necessary to relocate several of the Venturi meters and make 
some new connections in order to operate these pipe lines and meas- 
ure the water supplied in a satisfactory manner. During the year 
contracts have been made for the Venturi meters, gate valves, check 
valves, special castings and other materials required for this work, 
but on account of delays in the delivery of some of the materials 
only a portion of the construction work has been completed. 

In October a 36-inch connection, including a 36-inch main valve 
and 6-inch by-pass valve, was made between the former 48-inch 
Boston Water Works main and the easterly 48-inch Metropolitan 
Water Works Spot Pond line in Beacon Street at Winchester Street, 
Brookline, which will permit the use of the Spot Pond line for the 
Boston service. The cost of this connection was $2,091.85. 

Early in December a 20-inch Venturi meter with 6J-inch throat 
section, 6-inch blow-off and 20-inch check valve were installed on the 
former 20-inch Boston Water Works main in Harvard Street at the 
Boston-Brookline boundary line. On account of unfavorable weather 
the connection of the blow-off pipe with the drain was deferred and 
will be completed next season. The cost of the work at this place 
was $988.53. 

The 30-inch Venturi meter formerly maintained at the junction of 
Pearl and Walnut streets in Somerville was removed early in August, 
before the city of Somerville constructed the new street pavement 
at this place. A new 10-inch throat section was substituted for the 
old 13J-inch throat section formerly used with this meter and during 
December the meter was installed in the former Boston Water Works 
30-inch cement and iron main on Perkins Street at the Boston- 
Somerville boundary line. 'A 30-inch check valve and 12-inch blow- 
off were also installed at this place but on account of the unfavorable 
weather the work of connecting the blow-off pipe with the sewer was 
deferred and will be completed next season. The cost of removing 
the meter and making the new installation was $2,155.29. 



56 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

» 

Engineering. 

The engineering force employed in connection with construction 
work has made surveys, plans and studies for the various projects 
and prepared the contract specifications and estimates, and has 
supervised and inspected the work done and the materials furnished 
by the contractors. 

MAINTENANCE. 

Rainfall and Yield of Watersheds. 

The precipitation on the watersheds was below the normal until 
March 1; for the following three months it was close to the average; 
from June 1 to October 1 it was somewhat above the normal and 
was below the average during the remainder of the year. 

The total precipitation for the year was 43.43 inches on the 
Wachusett watershed, 39.96 inches on the Sudbury watershed and 
38.15 inches on the Cochituate watershed. 

The average precipitation on the Wachusett watershed for the 
past twenty years is 45.30 inches; on the Sudbury watershed for the 
past forty-two years 44.67 inches, and on the Cochituate watershed 
for the past fifty-four years 45.30 inches. 

The yield of the Wachusett watershed was above the normal dur- 
ing January and February, and April, May, June and July. The 
average for the year was 1,215,000 gallons per day per square mile, 
which is 13 per cent, greater than the average yield for the past 
twenty years. The yield of the Sudbury watershed was 904,000 
gallons per day per square mile during 1916, which is 92 per cent, of 
the average during the past forty-two years and 1 per cent, greater 
than the average for the past nineteen years, the period during which 
water has been discharged into Sudbury Reservoir from the Wachu- 
sett watershed. The yield of the Cochituate watershed was 1,026,000 
gallons per day per square mile in 1916, or 11 per cent, greater than 
the average for the past fifty-four years. 

During the year the city of Worcester turned 4,397,000,000 gallons 
of water into the Wachusett watershed from the 9.35 square miles 
formerly in the watershed which it took for its water supply in 1911. 
Of this quantity 648,200,000 gallons were received between June 15 
and December 15. 



QUANTITY OF WATER STORED IN THE WACHUSETT RESERVOIR 
AND IN ALL THE STORAGE RESERVOIRS COMBINED 
DURING 1 91 6 

JAN. FEB. MAR. APR. MAY JUN. JUL. AUG. SEP OCT. NOV. DEC. 



c/> 

c 
o 



82.000 



80.000 



78.000 



76.000 



74.000 



72.000 



70.000 



68.000 



O 66.000 



.2 64.000 



62,000 



60.000 



58,000 



56.000 



54,000 



COMBINED CAPACITY OF ALL STORAGE RESERVOIRS AT HIGH 


WATER > 
























































1 
c 
























of 

<Ef 
iWI 






















u 
or 
























u 
o 

< 
























a 
o 

At 
























H 




















, 


1 


b 




















H 


v 






















/^ 


V 






































































































RfcSEl 


IVOIR 






















^CAPACITY OF 


WACHUSi 


7X ^5 


ERVOIR 


/4r y/e/ 


' /*tf7f 


*> 






A, \ t 
























i u 

\ 3 
























\ < 














































































































































































































. 







JAN. FEB. MAR. APR. MAY JUN. JUL. AUG. 5ER OCT. NOV. DEC. 



82,000 



80.000 



78,000 



76.000 



74.000 



72.000 



70,000 



68,000 ^ 

c 
o 

CO 

66.000 o 



c 
64,000 .2 



62.000 



60,000 



58.000 



56.000 



54.000 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



57 



Stokage Reservoirs. 
The capacities of the storage reservoirs of the Metropolitan Water 
Works, the elevation of the water surfaces and the quantity of water 
stored in each reservoir at the beginning and at the end of the year 
are shown by the following table. 



Storage Reservoirs. 



Eleva- 
tion 1 

of 
High 

Water. 



Cochituate watershed : — 
Lake Cochituate, 2 . 

Sudbury watershed: — 
Sudbury Reservoir, 

Framingham Reservoir 

No. 1. 
Framingham Reservoir 

No. 2. 
Framingham Reservoir 

No. 3. 
Ashland Reservoir, 

Hopkinton Reservoir, 

Whitehall Reservoir, 

Farm Pond, . 

Wachusett watershed : — 

Wachusett Reservoir, 

Totals 



144.36 

260.00 
169. 75 
177. 87 
186.74 
225. 21 
305.00 
337. 91 
159. 25 

395.00 



Capacity 
(Gallons). 



2,097,100,000 

7,253,500,000 
287,500,000' 
529,900,000' 
1,180,000,000' 
1,416,400,000 
1,520,900,000 
1,256,900,000 
167,500,000 

64,968,000,000 



80,677,700,000 



Jan. 1, 1916. 



Eleva- 
tion 1 

of 

Water 

Surface. 



142. 93 

249. 53 
167. 89 
176.19 
184.48 
224.53 
304. 24 
337. 29 
157. 87 

391.05 



Amount 

stored 
(Gallons). 



1,760,000,000 

3,340,300,000 

224,300,000 

489,900,000 

1,017,600,000 

1,379,000,000 

1,473,300,000 

1,136,200,000 

94,400,000 

59,728,600,000 



70,643,600,000 



Jan. 1, 1917. 



Eleva- 
tion 1 

of 

Water 

Surface. 



143.23 

258. 49 
167. 70 
176.02 
183.53 
224. 28 
304.07 
336. 65 
157.39 

387. 11 



Amount 

stored 

(Gallons). 



1,830,100,000 

6,623,800,000 

216,100,000 

482,600,000 

942,300,000 

1,365,200,000 

1,462,700,000 

1,013,300,000 

69,600,000 

54,679,600,000 



68,685,300,000 



1 Elevation in feet above Boston City Base. 

2 Excluding Dudley Pond which was abandoned April 3, 1916. 



' To top of Flashboards. 



The diagram, facing page 56, shows the quantity of water stored 
in the Wachusett Reservoir and the quantity stored in all the storage 
reservoirs combined during the year. 

Wachusett Reservoir. — At the beginning of the year the Wachusett 
Reservoir contained 59,728,600,000 gallons of water or 5,049,000,000 
gallons more than at the close of the year. The water in the reser- 
voir was 3.95 feet below high-water line or at elevation 391.05 at 
the beginning of the year. It rose gradually to elevation 392.96, 
which was reached on February 4, and remained at about this ele- 
vation until February 26. Between February 23 and 26 there was 
a precipitation of 2.78 inches of warm rain which caused the water 
to rise 1.8 feet in the reservoir by March 1, when it was at elevation 



58 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

394.6, or within one-half a foot of high-water line. Water was then 
allowed to waste from the reservoir into the Nashua River below the 
dam in order to provide for the large yield which was anticipated 
from the deep accumulation of snow on the watershed. On March 
15, the new sluice gates at the Sudbury power station having been 
set in position and tested, the filling of that reservoir, which had 
been drawn down for this work, was begun with water from the 
Wachusett Reservoir and the waste from the reservoir was stopped. 
Under the draft for filling the Sudbury Reservoir the elevation of 
the water in the Wachusett Reservoir subsided until March 25 when 
it was at elevation 392.16. It then rose steadily with the melting of 
the snow on the watershed until it reached high-water line on April 
13, and remained above this elevation for the next four months, dur- 
ing which time water was wasted almost continuously, the waste 
having been resumed again on April 1 on account of the rapid melt- 
ing of the snow which produced such a large yield that on April 2 
it was necessary to waste water from the reservoir at the rate of 
530,000,000 gallons per day, in addition to the draft of 250,000,000 
gallons per day which was being maintained at the time for filling 
the Sudbury Reservoir. 

From February 29 to August 1 19,378,500,000 gallons of water 
were wasted from the reservoir through the pipes into the pool below 
the dam or over the spillway into the waste channel. The maximum 
rate at which water was wasted from the reservoir was 680,000,000 
gallons per day on June 3 and 4. The highest elevation reached by 
the water in the reservoir was 395.75 on June 11, and the lowest 
elevation was 387.07 on December 30. No water was wasted from 
the reservoir after August 1 and the water surface, which was at 
elevation 395.48 at that time, subsided with the constant draft for 
water supply at a practically uniform rate until the end of the year 
when it was at elevation 387.11. 

There has been discharged from the reservoir through the pool 
below the dam and the pipe line leading to the canal at the Lan- 
caster Mills 1,018,100,000 gallons of water, in accordance with the 
provisions of section 4 of chapter 488 of the Acts of the year 1895, 
which requires that not less than 12,000,000 gallons and such further 
quantity, not exceeding 12,000,000 gallons, as the owners of the mills 
shall deem necessary, shall be allowed to flow from the reservoir 
during each week. 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 59 

The emergency pumping station of the city of Worcester, located 
on the shore of the reservoir at South Bay in Boylston, was not 
operated by the city during the year. 

To prevent organic matter from being washed into the reservoir 
by the action of the waves on the slopes near Pine Hill in West 
Boylston the soil was stripped from an area 670 feet in length and 
from 5 to 60 feet in width, containing 0.2 of an acre, at a cost of 
$243.22. 

Miscellaneous debris brought into the reservoir during high water 
flow in the spring was collected from the shores and disposed of at 
a cost of $202.84. 

Brush and weeds have been mowed, raked up and burned along 
the sides of the highways adjoining the water works lands and the 
brooks flowing directly into the reservoir; along the margin of the 
reservoir for a distance of about 2 miles; from a strip of water works 
land about 100 feet in width extending for a distance of 2J miles 
along the highways bordering the reservoir, and at the North and 
South dikes. This work extended over a distance of 29f miles and 
cost $1,638.45. 

The bed of the Stillwater River for a length of about 650 feet 
above the Stillwater basin, where large quantities of material had 
been washed into it during freshets, was straightened and deepened 
about 1 foot for an average width of 50 feet at a cost of $377.28. 

The brook which enters the reservoir at Hastings Cove in Boyl- 
ston was straightened, graded and paved on the bottom and sides 
for a length of 972 feet at a cost of $713.30. 

A steam heating plant was installed at the Tucker house in Boyl- 
ston, which is occupied by patrolman Knight, who furnished the 
heater. The radiators and piping were furnished from the depart- 
ment storage yard and the labor was performed by the department 
employees. 

The buildings at the Clinton and Oakdale storage yards have been 
kept in good condition. The dwelling purchased from Rosie A. Howe 
last year, located near Waushacum Brook at Sterling Junction, has 
been rented to one of the department employees since November 1. 

A ditch 587 feet in length and about 2\ feet in depth was exca- 
vated, and concrete head wall and two 15-inch vitrified pipe culverts 
were constructed to provide an overflow at times of high water from 
the Lily Ponds at West Boylston. The excavated material was 



60 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

used for subgrading the forest road at this place, which was later 
surfaced with gravel. The cost of the work was $183.90. 

Wheelock wire fences were constructed along the boundary of the 
water works land for a distance of 2,767 feet at the Andrew J. 
Scarlett and W. A. Woods lands in West Boylston and the William 
Kingsbury land in Sterling at a cost of about 10 cents per linear 
foot. An equivalent length of party fence was constructed by these 
adjoining owners. 

The plank foot-bridge over the waste-weir at the dam, where 
unsafe, and two cracked cast-iron standards were repaired at a cost 
of $160.77. 

Sudbury Reservoir. — At the beginning of the year the water in 
Sudbury Reservoir was at elevation 249.53 or 9.47 feet below the 
crest of the waste-weir, having been kept down in connection with the 
construction of the power plant, and, with the exception of a few 
days early in February, the water was kept below this elevation 
until March 15 when it was at elevation 246.58. After this date 
there was no further necessity for keeping the water at a low eleva- 
tion and during the following three weeks the reservoir filled to the 
crest of the waste-weir, largely with water let down from the Wachu- 
sett Reservoir for this purpose. From April 11 to 26 water was 
allowed to flow over the waste- weir, which is at elevation 259. The 
flashboards were then put in place and the reservoir filled to high- 
water line, or elevation 260. 

From April 26 to September 28, when the hydro-electric unit for 
the Framingham Reservoir No. 3 service was put into regular oper- 
ation, the supply for Reservoir No. 3 was drawn over the waste-weir 
by regulating the flash-boards. After September 28 the water in 
the reservoir was kept below the top of the flash-boards and the 
entire supply to Reservoir No. 3 was passed through the turbine 
and used for the generation of electric energy. The flash-boards 
were removed on November 28, when the ice began to form, and the 
water was thereafter maintained from half a foot to a foot below the 
crest of the waste-weir. 

The usual attention has been given to the care of the reservoir 
lands and structures. Objectionable material which had collected in 
the coves was removed; the brush was mowed in the lanes through 
the woods along the boundary lines for a distance of 8 -miles; the 
stone wall in Clemmons Street was repaired; 17 chestnut poles were 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 61 

cut for future use in constructing a permanent telephone line to re- 
place the temporary line now maintained over private land; the life 
preservers and holders and the iron flash-board standards for the 
waste- weir were painted and 15 new stop-planks were made for use 
in the power station. 

The lower tenement in the house near the dam was painted and 
papered at a cost of $1 11.96, and has been occupied by the operator 
in charge of the power station since August 26, 1916. Leaks in the 
pipe through which water is supplied to the house and barn were 
repaired. Some repairs were made at the Cratty house in Fayville. 

The leaks in the copper roof of the power station were repaired at 
a cost of $140.56 and the walks and drives and grass land disturbed 
by the construction of the power plant were repaired. 

The runabout auto-truck purchased last year for the use of the 
foreman in charge of the work at the reservoir has materially in- 
creased the efficiency of the labor force and been of much value in 
extinguishing fires. The distance covered with the auto-truck during 
the year was about 7,200 miles. 

A parcel of land containing an area of one acre, located near the 
junction of Marlborough and Sears roads in Southborough, was ac- 
quired in fee during the year. 

Framingham Reservoir No. 3. — All of the water delivered through 
the Sudbury Aqueduct for the supply of the Metropolitan Water 
District was - v drawn from this reservoir which was in turn supplied 
with water from the Sudbury Reservoir as required, and on account 
of using the reservoir in this manner the flash-boards were kept on 
the overflow throughout the year and the water in the reservoir 
fluctuated between elevation 183 and 186 during the greater part of 
the year. In the latter part of March and early part of April the 
water was drawn down to elevation 181.50, and at times in April, 
May and June water was wasted over the top of the flash-boards 
which were at elevation 186.50. Water was also wasted from the 
reservoir through the waste gates at times from February to June, 
inclusive, and in November and December. 

The gate-house and dam received the usual care. Fertilizer was 
spread over the embankment and the boat house was shingled and 
painted. Brush was mowed and burned in the lanes through the 
woods along the boundary of the reservoir lands for a distance of 
2.5 miles. 



62 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

Framingham Reservoirs Nos. 1 and 2, Ashland, Hopkinton and 
Whitehall Reservoirs. — No water was drawn from these reservoirs 
for the supply of the District during the year and they were kept 
substantially full, and, with the exception of Whitehall Reservoir, 
with the flash-boards on the overflows except during cold weather 
when they were removed on account of the ice. The water was drawn 
down a foot or so, as usual, during the freshet season so that the 
amount of water wasted down the Sudbury River could be conven- 
iently regulated. 

A discharge of not less than 1,500,000 gallons per day was main- 
tained throughout the year from Reservoir No. 1 into the Sudbury 
River, as required by the provisions of chapter 177 of the Acts of 
the year 1872, and water was also discharged in larger quantities 
from time to time as required to dispose of a portion of the yield 
of the watershed above Dam No. 1 which could not be stored in the 
reservoirs. 

The usual attention was given to the dams, gate-houses and 
structures at these reservoirs. Fertilizer was spread on the embank- 
ments at Reservoirs Nos. 1 and 2. The riprap slopes and the grounds 
at all dams and the ironwork and stop-planks at the gate-houses 
have been kept in good condition. The foreman's house and barn 
and the tool-house at Reservoir No. 1 were painted and minor repairs 
were made at the premises occupied by the attendants at the Ash- 
land and Hopkinton reservoirs, and some pointing was done at the 
waste-weir at the Ashland Reservoir. Brush has been mowed and 
burned for a total length of 19 miles along the waste channels and 
in the lanes through the woods along the boundary lines of the water 
works lands at these reservoirs, and 6,200 linear feet of new lanes 
have been cut at Hopkinton Reservoir. 

At Whitehall Reservoir some grading was done on the water works 
lands located along the outlet brook between Wood Street and the 
lower mill pond dam and at the upper end of the brook near the 
reservoir. The number of cottages located on the shore of the res- 
ervoir is 65, which is the same number as at the close of last year. 
There were 11 motor boats, 80 row boats and 34 canoes in use on 
the reservoir during the year or a total of 125, which is an increase 
of 2 since last year. 

The foreman who has charge of the work at these reservoirs is 
also in charge of the work at Reservoir No. 3 and Cedar Swamp, 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 63 

and on account of the large area covered and the satisfactory re- 
sults obtained during the previous year with the runabout truck 
at Sudbury Reservoir a similar truck was purchased for his use in 
April and at the close of the year he had traveled a distance of 
6,900 miles in the truck in connection with his work. 

Farm Pond. — The water in Farm Pond was 1.38 feet below high 
water line at the beginning of the year. It rose gradually until May 
1 when it was 0.41 of a foot below high-water line. It then fell 
slowly and was 1.86 feet below high water at the close of the year. 

Under the rights reserved by legislation the town of Framingham 
and the railroad companies have continued to take water from the 
Farm Pond drainage area for water supply during the year, but 
no water was discharged into the pond from sources outside its 
watershed. No water was wasted from the pond and no water was 
drawn from it for use in the Metropolitan District. 

During the year the town of Framingham pumped 230,300,000 
gallons for a portion of its water supply from the filter-gallery lo- 
cated on the easterly shore of the pond, and the Boston & Albany 
and New York, New Haven & Hartford railroad companies took 
approximately 145,000,000 gallons directly from the pond. 

Lake Cochituate. — At the beginning of the year the water in Lake 
Cochituate was at elevation 142.93 or 1.43 feet below high- water 
line, and water was wasted from the lake as required to dispose of 
the yield between January 1 and July 26 and have the water down 
about 2.8 feet to allow for anticipated work on the improvement of 
Beaver Dam Brook, which, however, was not carried out, and the 
ivater in the lake was allowed to rise gradually and had reached 
elevation 143.23 at the end of the year. No water was discharged 
into the lake from outside its watershed during the year. 

New tin was put over the entire roof of the effluent gate-house, 
to replace the former tin roof which had been in service many years 
and was blown off by a heavy wind during a storm in December, 
1915. 

At the shop the 5 horse power engine and boiler were removed 
and a 9 horse power Hoadley engine from the store-house at Fram- 
ingham was installed in place thereof, and a lean-to about 16 feet 
long x 8 feet wide was constructed for housing the auto truck. 

The automobile used by the superintendent and sanitary in- 
spectors, the truck used along the aqueduct lines and the motor 



64 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

boat used on the lake were overhauled and repaired by the force at 
Lake Cochituate. 

In connection with the maintenance of the surface water drain 
from Cochituate Village the grass was mowed on the slopes of the 
open channel and the sediment was removed from the catch basins 
and from the sand catcher on Bannister's Brook. 

Minor repairs were made at the barn, wagon shed and foreman's 
house and some painting and papering were done at the house. Dur- 
ing the year 16 cottages and 2 garages were built by the adjoining 
property owners, making a total of 90 cottages around the lake at 
the end of the year. 

Alonzo S. Carson, who was employed as foreman at the lake by 
the city of Boston from June 14, 1889 to January 1, 1898, and after 
that date by this department, died on March 21 and since then 
John Ralston has had charge of the work at the lake in addition to 
the work along the Cochituate, Sudbury and Weston aqueducts. 

Dudley Pond. — Under the provisions of chapter 94 of the Gen- 
eral Acts of the year 1916, which took effect April 3, the connection 
with Lake Cochituate was permanently closed and all interest in 
and control over the waters of the pond were transferred to the town 
of Wayland on April 18. 

Aqueducts. 

Wachusett Aqueduct. — Water was discharged through the Wachu- 
sett Aqueduct from the Wachusett Reservoir during 321 days in 
1916. The total time that the aqueduct was in use is equivalent to 
174 days, 10 hours and 41 minutes, and the total quantity of water 
discharged was 37,448,200,000 gallons, equivalent to an average of 
102,317,000 gallons per day for the entire year. This quantity does 
not include 3,700,000 gallons used in cleaning the aqueduct. 

The Westborough State Hospital pumped 62,972,000 gallons of 
water, equivalent to an average consumption of 172,000 gallons per 
day, from the open channel at the lower end of the aqueduct. 

The usual care has been taken of the aqueduct lands and struc- 
tures and the brush, grass and weeds have been cut. The mowing 
covered a length of 10 miles and cost', about $87 per mile. Wheelock 
No. 65 wire fence was constructed along the aqueduct land for a 
length of 13,383 feet, at a cost of 15 cents per linear foot including 
16 iron gates each 10 feet in length. This fence replaces a spruce 
board fence which was erected in 1897. About 6 J acres of aqueduct 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 65 

embankment in Berlin and Northborough were regraded, dressed 
with fertilizer and sown with grass seed at a cost of $77 per acre. 

The work of improving the 6-aere parcel on the north side of the 
open channel, just below the upper dam, which was begun in 1915 
has been continued, the work this year including the construction of 
480 feet of board bottom drainage ditch and grading and seeding. 
The ditch cost $1.05 per linear foot and the grading and seeding 
cost $19 per acre. 

The upper 7 miles of the aqueduct was thoroughly scrubbed on 
the inside with stiff brooms and clean water in August, at a cost 
of $43 per mile. This work included the application of a wash of 
two coats of Portland cement grout containing 2 per cent. Medusa 
waterproofing compound to a length of 25 feet of the aqueduct at 
the westerly end of the Assabet Bridge, in continuation of the work 
done last year, to check a slight leakage which continued at this 
place. 

Early in the summer the portion of the open channel from the 
terminal chamber of the masonry aqueduct down to the upper dam 
was improved along the shore line by removing bunch grass and 
other vegetation and regrading the slopes with the fine material 
washed down by the flowing water and facing them with heavy 
gravel found along the shores. The cost of the work was 3.2 cents 
per linear foot of shore line, which is equivalent to a maintenance 
cost of less than $11 per mile of shore line per year. This work com- 
pleted the improvement of the shore line of the open channel for its 
entire length, which has been in progress during the past two years. 

A parcel of land containing 3.33 acres, located near the terminal 
chamber of the Wachusett Aqueduct, between the open channel and 
the New York, New Haven and Hartford Railroad, was acquired in 
fee, and an easement in a strip of land containing 0.33 of an acre, 
extending from the railroad to Cedar Street, was acquired for a right 
of way to the terminal chamber. 

Sudbury Aqueduct. — With the exception of 5 hours, on July 11, 
the Sudbury Aqueduct was in service throughout the year for con- 
veying water from Framingham Reservoir No. 3 to the Chestnut 
Hill distributing reservoir. The total quantity of water discharged 
through the aqueduct was 18,431,700,000 gallons, equivalent to an 
average of 50,360,000 gallons per day for the entire year, which is 
12,901,000 gallons per day less than in 1915. This reduction was 



66 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

due to the increased flow in the Weston Aqueduct since February 
8, when the new 60-inch Weston Aqueduct Supply Main was put in 
service. 

The interior of the gate-house at Farm Pond was cleaned and 
painted and minor repairs were made to other structures along the 
line of the aqueduct. The culverts were kept free from snow and 
ice; brush, grass and weeds were mowed where the aqueduct land is 
not cared for by the adjoining owners. Chemical fertilizer was 
spread over the embankments where necessary to keep the land in 
good condition, 28,500 pounds of fertilizer being used for this purpose. 

The town of Wellesley laid a 6-inch water pipe in Brookside Road 
over the two 48-inch pipes and under the 60-inch pipe at the Rose- 
mary siphon. The city of Newton constructed 620 feet of 8-inch 
sewer and 1,080 feet of 6-inch water pipe parallel with the aqueduct 
in Tyler Terrace. For the sewers cast iron pipe with lead joints was 
used and the laying of the pipe was carefully inspected to make sure 
that it was perfectly tight. 

Weston Aqueduct. — Water was supplied from the Sudbury Res- 
ervoir to the Weston Reservoir through the Weston Aqueduct on 353 
days during the year. The total time that this portion of the 
aqueduct was in service was equivalent to 327 days, 4 hours and 
50 minutes, and the total quantity of water discharged was 19,288,- 
000,000 gallons, equivalent to an average of 52,699,000 gallons per 
day for the entire year, which is 19,126,000 gallons per day more 
than in 1915, due to the increased flow since February 8, when the 
new 60-inch Weston Aqueduct Supply Main was put into service. 
This portion of the aqueduct was out of service twice in January and 
twice in February in connection with the installation of the hydro- 
electric machinery in the Sudbury power station, and the entire 
aqueduct was out of service from April 26 to May 1, inclusive, while 
the Weston Aqueduct Supply Mains were shut off. Since the in- 
stallation of the hydro-electric machinery at the Sudbury power 
station was completed, on November 26, the upper portion of the 
Weston Aqueduct has not been in service on Sundays and holidays 
and the total flow for the week has been discharged between 7 a.m. 
and 11 p.m. on the other days. 

At the head-house, near the Sudbury Dam, several joint leaks 
were repaired in two of the 60-inch pipe lines. These pipes enter 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 67 

the head-house on the up-stream side. The leaks were detected 
from the water which rose to the surface of the ground. The pipes 
were uncovered and small joint leaks were found, one on top of pipe 
line No. 2 at the 6th joint from the end of the pipe line in the head- 
house, one on top of pipe line No. 3 at the 5th joint, and another 
extending over the upper half of the 4th joint in this line. The 
weir and wooden racks formerly maintained in the head-house were 
removed and all necessary changes were made to provide for the use 
of the aqueduct in connection with the operation of the Sudbury 
power station. The iron columns which support the floor of the 
head-house, the floor beams at siphon chamber No. 1 and all of the 
manhole covers along the line were painted. 

The lower aqueduct lands and terminal chamber were cared for by 
the usual force. 

All of the culverts have been kept free from snow and ice. At 
the White place in Nobscot some painting and papering were done 
and the roof of the shed of the store-house was shingled. 

Several stretches of fence were repaired, the brush, grass and 
weeds were mowed on the aqueduct land and chemical fertilizer was 
spread over the embankments where necessary to maintain them in 
fertile condition. About 22,000 pounds of fertilizer was used and 
approximately two-thirds of the total area of the embankments was 
fertilized. This work was located principally between Edgell Street, 
Framingham, and Main Street in Way land. The sprouts in the 
lanes through the woods along the boundary lines of the aqueduct 
lands at the White place were cut and burned. 

Cochituate Aqueduct — No water was discharged through the 
Cochituate Aqueduct during the year and only the portion of it 
below the influent chamber at Chestnut Hill Reservoir was used in 
connection with the operation of the works. 

The embankments along the line were dressed with chemical 
fertilizer where necessary to keep them in satisfactory condition; 
6,000 pounds of fertilizer was used for this purpose. The culverts 
along the line have been kept open, new fences have been built for 
a length of 555 feet and the old fence on the north side of Wash- 
ington Street in Wellesley was removed. Brush, grass and weeds 
were mowed along the line. 

Considerable work has been done in the vicinity of the aqueduct 



68 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

during the year by the town of Wellesley in constructing its new 
sewerage system. In connection with this work a 12-inch sewer 
was laid under the aqueduct just east of Morton's culvert, which 
is located a short distance from the Town Hall. The aqueduct at 
this place is built in quite a high embankment and to guard against 
possible injury to the aqueduct from settlement, the contractor who 
was laying the sewer for the town was not allowed to carry the 
trench excavation into the slopes of the embankment beyond the 
point where the material supporting the aqueduct would stand at 
the angle of repose, and he was required to securely sheet and brace 
the excavation. A pipe 24 inches in diameter and 20 feet in length, 
made of steel plates f of an inch in thickness, was then forced under 
the aqueduct by using a 35-ton hydraulic jack and excavating the 
material from the end of the pipe as it was pushed ahead. To keep 
the pipe on line and grade the portion projecting beyond the em- 
bankment was securely held in a timber cradle constructed for the 
purpose. The time required to force the pipe under the aqueduct 
was six days, the daily progress varying from 1J feet to 4£ feet. 
The material excavated was fine sand for the lower two-thirds, 
with gravel filling for the upper one-third. After the 24-inch pipe 
was forced through a 12-inch cast-iron sewer pipe was laid inside of 
it and the space between the pipes was filled solid with cement grout 
under pressure. 

Sewers 8 inches in diameter were constructed across and over the 
aqueduct at Rice Street, Forest Street and Laurel Avenue. Sewers 
10 inches in diameter were laid above the aqueduct in Central Street 
between Weston Road and Linden Street for a distance of 1,327 
feet, and although the structures are approximately parallel the 
sewer crosses the aqueduct three times. A sewer 10 inches in di- 
ameter was also constructed above the aqueduct for a distance of 
680 feet in Washington Street. This sewer crosses the aqueduct at 
Abbott Road and runs northeasterly parallel to and about 25 feet 
east of the aqueduct. 

All of the sewers located near the aqueduct were laid with cast- 
iron pipes and lead joints and the manholes were thoroughly plastered 
with Portland cement mortar under our inspection to insure water- 
tight work. 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 69 

Sanitary Inspection of Watersheds. 

The usual sanitary inspection of the watersheds was made during 
the year for the purpose of preventing pollution of the water supply. 
A summary of the work is given in the tables on pages 70 and 71. 

Ice cutting operations were inspected at several ponds and res- 
ervoirs during the winter and special watchmen were employed from 
May to September, inclusive, to prevent bathing and unauthorized 
boating or fishing in the reservoirs. 

Wachusett Watershed. 

On the Wachusett watershed 2 dwellings were built during the 
year in Boylston, 14 in West Boylston and 7 in Holden; and 12 
premises were destroyed by fire and 2 removed. Five small cottages 
were built at the Waushacum Lakes in Sterling. As a result of these 
changes there has been an increase of 14 premises on the watershed 
during the year, making a total of 1,720 premises. 



70 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 







•pasn si ja^AY 


*<*< 


Cl (M 


^H 


t~ 


CO 


ie 


■^ 


CM 


OS O 




1-H 




E 
E 


°N T l ! t l A ao sasiuiaijj 


























•A^ddng s^ba 


00 


OS ■«*< 
CO OS 


CO 

co 


*o 


CM 

CM 


os 


CO 

00 


Cl 

CO 


»o CO 

O CO 


CO 
CM 


CO 

co 


OS 


ft 


-iy SaiABq sasixuajjj 




1-H 




** 










Cl »-i 


co 




CO 


w 




























H 




























«1 


•A'lddng otj 


oo 


1 CO 


i 


oo 
oo 


O 

os 


oo 


1 


1 


1 1 


I 


1 


OS 




-qnj^ SutAisq sesiuiajj 










1-H 














CM 


5« 




1 


1 1-H 


1 


t>. 


t^ 


CO 


1-1 


1-H 


te> ■*« 


CO 


1 


Cl 


Z w 


'A'.lCKp'BJSI^BSUfl 
























■** 


S ° 






























o 


1-H OO 


■»* 


CO 


_ 


OS 


CO 


CO 


OS OS 


1-H 


■>* 


00 


o fc 


•Aio^oBjsii'Bg 


t-» 


■** o 

CI 


co 


o 

CI 


o 

<M 


OO 


00 


CO 


o co 

CM »-! 


CO 

co 


CO 


CO 


UW 






























•spaq-ja^tj 


1 


1-t 1 


1 


1 


i-h 


1 


1 


1 


1— 1 1-4 


as 


1 


00 
OS 




03. paixreo aSBuiuiQ 




























(M 


th cm 


1-H 


Cl 


i»i 


^ 


CO 


1 


T* »M 


t>. 


1 


00 




•aSuutuiQ o^ 
























CM 




t>- 


CO o 


(M 


t^ 


CJ 


OS 


oo 


■«*< 


« Cl 


«o 


Cl 


i— * 




•q.uBO'BA^ sasitnaij; 




»-< 






i-H 








Cl »~l 






o 


•sa^s'B^ 


1 


1 l 


1 


i-h 


co 


-H 


1 


^i 


1 1 


l 


1 


CO 


ft 

w 

6 

w 

Pi 
g 


Suurv^oBjmi'Bi^ 






























1 


1 i-i 


1 


1 


CI 


^H 


_ 


1 


»-i co 


i-t 


1 


o 


fa 


•A\io:pejsi^sufi 




i 


















































n < 




.-1 


rH i—l 


O 


os 


"3 




»—i 


Cl 


U5 Tj< 


OS 


CO 


CM 


9 
OS 


« 


•jClCXp'BJSl^'Bg 


CM 


<M iO 


CI 


00 


■^ 


•* 


■<* 


Cl 


OS CO 


»o 


»-H 


00 


O 

fa 

o 

55 






























M 


•Xaoq.o'BjsT^'BsufX 


1 


1 "H 


1 


CO 


CI 


Cl 


1 


1 


CO CM 


Cl 


1 


00 

1— « 


O 

M 

H 

<! 


fa £ 

Q ft 






























O 


O CO 


t>- 


»o 


rt< 


o> 


t^ 


CM 


CS TJ< 


CO 


Tft 


o 


o 

fa 


•.Aicyp'Bjsi^g 


CI 


CI -^* 


1-H 


CO 


CI 


co 


co 


CI 


O0 «o 


t» 




1-H 

»o 


>-< 

IK 

! 


2 






















































j 




1 


1 1 


1 


I 


o 


1 


1 


1 


^1 1 


I 


1 







•e3BurejQ ^utg loaaiQ 


























•e3t? 


1 


1 1 


1 


l 


Cl 


1 


I 


1 


1 1 


1 


1 


CM 




-UIBJQ jSauj ^oojipux 


























•8313 


1 


1 1 


1 


1 


1 


I 


1 


1 


1 1 


1 


1 


o 




-uraiQ a'auj ^oajiQ 


























•9161 


ci 


1 OS 


1 


CO 


CO 


I 


1 


1 


•Ttl 1-H 


I 


~ 


CO 
CM 




3uunp 3np sjoodssaQ 


























'9161 




CO CI 


CO 


CI 


CO 


CM 


o 


kO 


Tfl CO 


CM 


no 


£. 




Tt< 


1-H -* 




CM 


CO 


■* 


■* 




O0 CO 


oo 


Cl 


* 




ajojaq Snp sioodssaQ 










1-H 


















t -pa^oads 


o 


^H OS 

t* o 


Hj< 

co 


o 


00 

1-H 


CM 

CJ 


oo 


CO 


*>* CO 


CO 


CO 


o 

CM 


-UI ( 


sasiraaij jo jaqumjsi 




CI 
















CO 






















M 














H 


• 


• • 


• 




o 
5 




o 
o 
u 

m 


• 


1 • 


• 


• 


• 




U 










C 




s 














HH 










tt 




OJ 




Js O 












A 


X 


-* 


.* 




V 


a 


. 


CD > 












H 

i— ( 

Q 


o 
5 

a 

« 

o 

a 

<v 
pel 


o M 

° 8 

"ft W 

s o 


8 

c 

« 

© 


8 

« 


IS 

03 

a 

s 

cl 

CO 

•3 


05 
& 
O 
.ft 

u 
oo 

3 


^3 
o 
05 

3 
O 

as 


O 
O 
ft 

m 

ft 

O 

c 

H 




s 

3 

o 
05 

CO 

ft 

05 


1 

x: 

o 

p. 

0) 


of 

"c3 
o 
H 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



71 



Ob 



co 



© 
©* 

*~ 
J 



a, 

CO 

© 

•40 

<s 



5ss 

v. 



3 

*2 



i< 

So 

* 8 
o m 

OH 



O 



'4 
O 



•itlO^O'BJSI^SUQ 



, itlO^0 , BJ6X^'Bg 



I cocoes .H i o>00(M!O I i>. 



(N05 0SM CO CO OS t>- 1^ oo 
CO <MO CO CM CO i-H i-l l>- 



<NOH» 



o* 



•spaq-jaqijl 
paixit?o aSBmeiQ 



•oSbutcjq; o^; 



•!>ui3ou^ saspnaij 



•sa^se^ 



3uun;o'Bjnu'Bj\[ 



I I <MCi I I I I I I 



CO | ON »H io t»- O CM CO 



lilt 111 1 — I 1 I 



* 

T3 



< M 



•yCjO^.O'BJST^SUfl 



'AlCXP'ejSTqUg 



| rt^ti-l »H | COeMi-lr-l 



H | |W ■* 



a 

3 



OQ O 



•iCaCK^O'BJSI^BSU]^ 



•Ajo^orajsrveg 



I C»«N»<N »H I ©NHlO o 



•eSBurejQ 3[nig ^oaiiQ 



•aSra 



•aSu 
-ureaQ itAuj ^oaiiQ 



•9I6X 
Suunp 3np spodssaQ 



•9T6I 
ajojaq 3np spodssaQ 



•suoypauuoQ aajaag 



i i i i i i i i i i i 



I I H I I I I i-l I CN 



i i i i i i 



I WHK5 (OH | H | | 



<Oit^ OONO)MU5 
>>»«© WOMOtON 
CM CM CM CN CNI ^H t-i 



I I I I I l>- 



I I I I 



I I I 



I I I I I I 



OS CO Oi CO 

»c ■>* «» to 



I CO (M CO 

t- o 

t-- CO 



x 'pa^oads 
-ui sasiraaij }o laqrani,! 



H 
O 

H 



o coo co 

OJOSOcM COCOOCOt^-OS 
CO COO MC<lTl<iHiHN 



CM CO COO 

NOHN 



. a 

c3 



o 
p ^ 



o 



0) 



liftii'P 



3 © . 
-Q g ft 

a gco 

'-I -^ . 
© © tj 

0)-C - 



« 
H 

OB 

w 

e 



a 



a 

c 



r^: 



S o o § H - 



o o o >: * 



Ore 

© a aj <U 

-^ « fa > 

a oi oo 
MPnOM 



pqQ "3 



o 



72 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

Sudbury Watershed. 

On the Sudbury watershed there were 4,849 premises at the be- 
ginning of the year and 4,874 at the end of the year, an increase of 

25 premises during the year. This increase results from the con- 
struction of 30 buildings and the destruction by fire or removal of 
5 buildings. 

Cochituate Watershed. 

On the Cochituate watershed there were 3,206 premises at the 
beginning of the year and 3,144 at the end of the year, a decrease 
of 62 premises during the year. This decrease results from the ex- 
clusion of 151 premises on the Dudley Pond watershed from the 
Cochituate system and the addition of 89 premises on this water- 
shed during the year. The premises excluded at Dudley Pond in- 
clude 46 permanent dwellings, 94 summer cottages and 11 other build- 
ings. Seventy-three of the premises have wells, 70 use the public water 
supply and 88 have cesspools. 

Protection of the Water Supply. 

Filtration and Chlorination. 

On the Wachusett watershed the surface water from 525 acres in 
the village of Sterling has been filtered at the Sterling filter-beds. 
The sewage from the Worcester County Training School has been 
purified at the filter-beds on Beaman Street in West Boylston, and 
the sewage from five summer cottages at Sterling Junction was 
filtered at the Gates Terrace filter-beds from April 18 to November 
4. The cost of maintaining all of these filters was $591.14. 

On the Sudbury watershed the surface water from an area of 2 
square miles in Marlborough has been filtered at the Marlborough 
Brook filter-beds before entering the Sudbury Reservoir. Diluted 
sewage from the Marlborough main sewer was received at the com- 
bined storage reservoir and filter-bed on Farm Road from February 

26 to 29, inclusive; March 27 to April 18, inclusive; April 28 and 
29, May 7 to 9, inclusive, and June 17. The ground water from the 
sewer underdrain was received from March 1 to 11 and 19 to 22, 
inclusive, and on March 26, April 19 to 27, inclusive, and from May 
7 to June 10, inclusive. The drainage from the Southborough swim- 
ming pool was filtered and the surface water from the Fay School 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 73 

grounds in Southborough, and from Cherry Street Brook at Fayville 
was treated with calcium hypochlorite at times during the year 
when this treatment appeared to be desirable. The cost of the fil- 
tration and chlorination work on the Sudbury watershed was 
$3,209.98. 

On the Cochituate watershed the surface water from an area of 
about one square mile of the thickly settled portion of the town of 
Natick was pumped at the Pegan filter station and filtered before 
it was allowed to enter Lake Cochituate, with the exception, how- 
ever, of the overflow from the intercepting reservoir from February 
25 to 29, inclusive; March 26 to 31, inclusive; April 1 to 5, inclusive; 
April 9, 15, 16, 23, 29 and 30, May 17 and June 17, amounting to 
20,000,000 gallons, all of which was treated with calcium hypochlo- 
rite. The pumping station was operated on 251 days during the 
year and 344,681,000 gallons, equivalent to an average of 942,000 
gallons per day for the entire year was pumped to the filters. The 
cost of operating and maintaining the pumping station and filters 
was $3,752.42, which is equivalent to a cost of $10.89 per million 
gallons pumped. 

Improvement of Swamps and Brooks. 

The ditches maintained in the swamps on the watersheds for 
improving the quality of the water were cleaned and the weeds and 
brush were mowed for a width of 10 to 20 feet on both sides where 
necessary. The total length of these ditches is 36.49 miles, of which 
27.55 miles have been cared for by the Wachusett Department, at 
a cost of $1,291.21 for the usual cleaning and mowing and an addi- 
tional cost of $1,051.42 for repairing slopes and paving along the 
ditches tributary to the open channel and to the Sterling filter-beds 
for a length of 11.87 miles. The cost of the usual cleaning and 
mowing along the 8.94 miles of ditches which were cared for by the 
Sudbury Department was $250.94. 

An area of about 3J acres in Big Crane Swamp in Westborough, 
which was thickly grown with cedars, was thinned and improved at 
a cost of $562.07, and 1,437 first class fence posts and a considerable 
amount of cord wood, with an aggregate value of about one-half 
the cost of the work, were obtained. The fence posts were retained 
for our own use and the cord wood was sold. 

During the year E. W. Wheeler & Son of Berlin completed the 



74 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

removal from an area of 105 acres in Big Crane Swamp of the stand- 
ing and burned timber purchased in February, 1911. 

The lanes cut in previous years along the boundary line of Cedar 
Swamp in the Sudbury Department were mowed for a length of 15,560 
feet and new lanes were cut for a length of 3,040 feet. 

The work of improving Gates Brook in the Wachusett watershed 
at the district known as "The Settlement " in West Boylston, which 
was undertaken in the latter part of 1915 r was resumed July 31 and 
continued until November 18. The work done during 1916 includes 
the construction of 4 concrete culverts and 815 linear feet of open 
channel with standard board bottom, and side slopes rising 1 foot 
vertical in 2 feet horizontal paved with field stones for a vertical 
height of If feet. About one-third of the work is now finished and 
the expenditures during 1916 were $2,842.03 for labor and $446 
for materials. The unit costs were $1.26 per cubic yard for earth 
excavation and disposal, $9.05 per cubic yard for concrete masonry 
in culverts, $0.53 per square yard for stone paving and $0.11 per 
linear foot for the board bottom. When the work is completed the 
water of the brook will be confined to the new channel and the 
flooding during wet weather of the adjoining swamp land on which 
a number of dwellings without proper drainage facilities have been 
built will be prevented, and satisfactory measures can be taken to 
prevent the pollution of the water supply. 

Acquisition of Land. 

For the protection of the water supply on the Wachusett water- 
shed 21.02 acres of land located near the Waushacum Lakes in 
Sterling, 4.33 acres located near the Wachusett Reservoir in West 
Boylston and 0.421 of an acre located near Gates Brook in West 
Boylston have been acquired during the year. 

Clinton Sewage Disposal Works. 

Pumping Station. 

The Clinton sewerage pumping station was operated daily and 
the quantity of sewage pumped to the filter-beds is equivalent to 
1,225,000 gallons a day throughout the year, which is 284,000 gallons 
per day more than in 1915. The increase in pumping over the pre- 
vious year appears to have been due to the leakage of ground water 
into the section of the town sewer which is located along the Nashua 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 75 

River during the first half of the year when there was high water in 
the river. The quantity of sewage pumped in 1916 was nearly 
double the quantity pumped in 1900, when the works were put into 
operation. All of the sewage was pumped with the electric motor- 
driven 12-inch DeLaval centrifugal pump. The pumping statistics 
are as follows : — 

Total pumpage (gallons), 448,205,000 

Average pumpage (gallons per day), 1,225,000 

Electric energy used (kilowatt hours), . ... . . . 145,466 

Pumpage per kilowatt hour (gallons), 3,081 

Average lift (feet), . . . ., 48.1 

Efficiency of pumping unit and transmission line (per cent), . , 51 .9 

Coal used for burning sludge and heating (pounds), .... 86,005 

Cost of pumping: — 

Labor, $841 80 

Electric energy at $5.30 per thousand kilowatt hours, . . . 770 97 

Coal for burning sludge and heating, . 167 01 

Repairs and supplies, 214 92 

Total for station, $1,994 70 

Cost per million gallons, $4 45 

Cost per million foot gallons, . 0925 

The interior and exterior woodwork of the pumping station was 
painted and the slate roof was repaired. The building is now in 
good condition. 

Filters. 

The filters were operated in the same manner as during the pre- 
vious year, with the settling basins out of service during the summer. 
While there appears to be some improvement in regard to the odors 
from the filtration area with the settling basins out of service, the 
purification of the sewage continues to be less efficient than when 
they are in use, and if the quantity of sewage to be filtered should 
be as large during the coming year as in 1916 it would seem to be 
desirable to use the settling basins throughout the year as formerly, 
although the odors from the filtration area may be occasionally 
somewhat objectionable with the settling basins in use. The cost 
of maintaining the filters during 1916 was as follows: — 



76 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

Labor, $5,044 24 

Supplies and expenses, 68 37 

Total, $5,112 61 

Cost per million gallons filtered, $11 43 



Tbe average results of chemical analyses of sewage and effluent 
from the filters for the year 1914, when the settling basins were 
used throughout the year, and for the years 1915 and 1916, with the 
settling basins out of service during the summer, are given in the 



following table : — 









(Parts per 


100,000.] 










1914. 


1915. 


1916. 




January 
to June. 


July to 
December. 


Whole 
Year. 


Albuminoid ammonia, sewage, 


1.3775 


1.4350 


.5543 


1.4967 


1.0255 


Albuminoid ammonia, effluent, 






.0758 


. 09347 


.0845 


.1122 


.0983 


Reduction, per cent., 






94 


93.5 


85 


93 


90 


Oxygen consumed, sewage, 






10.825 


9.5333 


5.10 


10.30 


,7-70 


Free ammonia, sewage, . 






4. 1658 


3. 7867 


1.8533 


3.7167 


2.7850 


Free ammonia, effluent, . 






.3345 


.5924 


.6059 


1.4573 


1.0316 


Reduction, per cent., 






92 


84 


67 


61 


63 


Nitrogen as nitrates, effluent, 






1.0559 


.7152 


.2890 


.4495 


.3693 


Iron, effluent, .... 






.0802 


. 30815 


.559 


1.545 


1.052 


Average quantity of sewage filtered, gal- 
lons per day. 


1,022,000 


941,000 


1,557,800 


894,500 


1,225,000 



Four of the six houses located on High Street in Lancaster, which 
were acquired in connection with the construction of the filters, 
were sold at auction on October 6. The three houses on the southeast 
side of the street, known as the Sonia, Lalone and Fuller houses, 
were sold for removal, and the Moisen house, located on the north- 
westerly side of High Street, on a lot of land entirely detached from 
the remaining water works land in the vicinity, was sold with the 
lot. The two McLean houses on the northwest side of High Street, 
which were retained, have been repaired and are now in good con- 
dition. One of them is occupied by one of the water works em- 
ployees at the filter-beds and the other by a party having no con- 
nection with the works. 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 77 

Forestry. 
Wachusett Department. 

An area of about 4 acres at the Wachusett Reservoir near the 
North Dike was planted with 3,400 3-year-old white pine seedlings 
from the North Dike nursery, and 9,100 3-year-old white pine 
seedlings from this nursery and 1,800 4-year-old white spruce seed- 
lings from the Oakdale nursery were planted where previous plant- 
ings had failed in West Boylston and Sterling. The necessary 
attention was given to the Oakdale and North Dike nurseries. 

Fifty thousand 2-year-old white pine seedlings, 50,000 2-year-old 
Scotch pine seedlings and 50,000 2-year-old red pine seedlings 
received from the State nursery at Amherst were set out at the 
Oakdale nursery, which at the end of the year contained the 
following : — 

2-year-old white pine seedlings, in seed beds, . . . . . . 55,600 

2-year-old white pine seedlings, in transplant beds, 49,700 

2-year-old red pine seedlings, in transplant beds, 44,700 

2-year-old Scotch pine seedlings, in transplant beds, .... 41,400 

4-year-old red pine seedlings, in transplant beds, 120 

2-year-old Norway pines, 200 

5-year-old sequoias, 120 

5-year-old white spruce seedlings, in transplant beds, .... 12,900 

1-year-old tamarack seedlings, in seed beds, 9,600 

1-year-old arbor vitse seedlings, in seed beds, 400 



214,740 



Fifty-three thousand 2-year-old white pine seedlings from the 
State nursery at Amherst were set out at the North Dike nursery, 
which at the end of the year contained the following : — 

2-year-old white pine seedlings, in transplant beds, . . . . . 46,300 
4-year-old white pine seedlings, in transplant beds, 94,000 



140,300 



To prevent the spread of the Chestnut Bark disease an area of 
3| acres in West Boylston, grown largely with 25 and 30-year-old 
chestnut trees, was cleared at a net cost of about $32.00 per acre. 
An improvement thinning was made in an area of about 22 acres 



78 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

adjacent to the highway and about midway between Clinton and 
Boylston at a net cost of about $9.00 per acre. Gray birch and 
other trees which interfered with the growth of the 5 to 10-year-old 
white pine trees were cut over an area of 93 acres in Boylston and 
West Boylston at a net cost of about $8.60 per acre. The brush and 
weeds which interfered with the growth of the white pines planted in 
1915 on 45 acres of land along the open channel were mowed and 
disposed of at a cost of $5.90 per acre. 

About 350 acres of land along the main highways about the 
Wachusett Reservoir and at the dam, which was known to be in- 
fested with gypsy moths, was sprayed with arsenate of lead between 
May 31 and July 11. This work was done with the power sprayer 
auto truck at a cost of $1,263.19, and 6,700 pounds of arsenate of 
lead was used. During the latter part of the year the marginal lands 
at the reservoir were scouted for gypsy moth egg clusters, which 
were painted with creosote where found. At the close of the year 
about 2,000 acres of land had been covered and 143,100 egg clusters 
had been found and painted at a cost of $818.00. 

During July and August all of the plantings on the marginal lands 
around the reservoir were inspected for the pine tree weevil on two 
occasions. During the first inspection 5,900 leaders were cut and 
2,050 during the second inspection. The cost of the work was 
$258.30. 

The entire cost of protecting the trees and plantings from insects 
and disease during the year was $2,787.73. 

The usual fire patrol service was maintained during the spring and 
fall. On May 11 two fires occurred which burned over about 80 
acres of Water Works land in Clinton, Sterling and West Boylston. 
The damage done was slight as the growth on a large part of the area 
was of little value. 

The brush, grass and weeds on 25§ miles of the marginal fire 
guard, which is 40 feet wide, and on 31 f miles of forest roads, 
which are 15 feet wide, were mowed and burned at a cost of 
$2,063.13. A marginal strip 100 feet wide adjacent to the highways 
bordering the reservoir was improved for a length of 5j miles. The 
work covered an area of about 105 acres and cost $16.30 per acre. 
The forest road around the Lily Ponds in West Boylston was 
repaired for a length of 650 feet at a cost of $132.84. 

The area of the Water Works land at the Wachusett Reservoir 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 79 

which has been planted with trees since the field planting was 
begun in 1902 is 1,424 acres. The total expenditures for forest al 
work during the year in the Wachusett Department was $9,981.23. 

Sudbury Department. 

At the Sudbury Reservoir 22 acres of land near Acre Bridge Road, 
12 acres on Pine Hill, 2 acres on Farm Road and 3 acres on the east 
side of the reservoir north of Boston Road were prepared for plant- 
ing at a cost of $18.00 per acre. 

In April and May 26,000 4-year-old white pine seedlings were set 
out near Acre Bridge Road, 4,000 near the Ball place and 8,700 on the 
east and west shores of the reservoir north of Boston Road. In May 
5,800 4-year-old white pine seedlings were set out on the west shore 
at Ashland Reservoir and 2,400 4-year-old white pine seedlings were 
set out near the dam at Whitehall Reservoir and 2,600 on the west 
shore of this reservoir near Spring Street. About 1,400 5 to 7-year- 
old white pines, obtained from the woods, were set out on the slope 
between the Weston Aqueduct and the old Connecticut Path just 
east of Main Street in Wayland. 

Early in the spring 50,000 2-year-old white pine seedlings, 50,000 
^-year-old Scotch pine seedlings and 50,000 2-year-old red pine 
seedlings were received from the State nursery at Amherst and were 
set out at the nursery at the Sudbury Reservoir, which now contains 
the following: — 

50,000 2-year-old white pine seedlings. 
50,000 2-year-old red pine seedlings. 
50,000 2-year-old Scotch pine seedlings. 
50,000 3-year-old spruce seedlings. 

The nursery received the necessary attention. One man was kept 
at work most of the time during the spring, summer and early fall. 

Fire patrol service was maintained at times when the conditions 
were favorable for fires to spread rapidly, and where pine trees had 
been planted along the highways the dry grass and brush were mowed, 
or burned if conditions were favorable, between the highway and 
the plantings. 

Six fires occurred at the Sudbury Reservoir and burned over areas 
Tanging from %o of an acre to 3 J acres. One of the fires was 
-caused by sparks from a locomotive on the New York, New Haven 



80 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

& Hartford Railroad; the cause of the others was not determined. 
About 7,700 white pines, ranging from 4-year-old seedlings to trees 
5 feet in height, were injured or destroyed. The trees at the Sudbury 
and Framingham reservoirs, at Lake Cochituate and at the White 
place and siphon chamber No. 2 on the Weston Aqueduct were 
sprayed with arsenate of lead to protect them from the gypsy moth 
and other insects. A horse-drawn power sprayer was used for this 
work. It was in use 19 days at Sudbury Reservoir, 4 days at the 
Framingham Reservoirs, llf days at Lake Cochituate and 2 days at 
the Weston Aqueduct. The total cost of the work was $1,644.22 and 
9,600 pounds of arsenate of lead was used. 

Some time was spent scouting for gypsy moth egg clusters and 
painting them with creosote, and 120,200 clusters were painted at 
Sudbury Reservoir, 67,400 at the Framingham reservoirs, 900 at 
Ashland Reservoir, 17,800 along the Sudbury Aqueduct, 56,600 along 
the Cochituate Aqueduct and 20,900 along the Weston Aqueduct, 
making a total of 283,800 clusters found and painted at a cost of 
$864.07. All of the trees except the pines along the Cochituate 
Aqueduct for a distance of 500 feet west of Oak Street in Natick 
were so badly infested by gypsy moths that they were cut down. 

The plantings in this department were inspected for the pine tree 
weevil and the leaders were cut and destroyed wherever the weevils 
were found, and in some instances a second inspection was necessary. 
The cost of the work was about $140.00. 

The brown-tail moth caterpillars were destroyed within 50 feet of 
the highways at the Sudbury and Framingham reservoirs. 

The total expenditures for forestal work in the Sudbury Depart- 
ment were $6,229.77. 

Distribution Department. 

The gypsy and brown-tail moths and the elm leaf beetles were 
destroyed on the Water Works lands around the distribution res- 
ervoirs as in former years by spraying the foliage with arsenate of 
lead in June, by painting the gypsy moth egg clusters with creosote 
and cutting and burning webs of the brown-tail moth during the 
winter. The spraying was done with a horse-drawn power sprayer; 
an area of approximately 165 acres was covered and 7,110 pounds 
of arsenate of lead was used. The cost of the work was $2,668.29. 

Of the 300 4-year-old white spruce trees received from the Oakdale 
nursery 150 were set out on the Water Works land at Spot Pond 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



81 



and the remainder were set out on the Water Works land near the 
Lawrence basin at Chestnut Hill Reservoir. 

Some of the pine trees at the Weston Reservoir and Spot Pond 
were attacked by the pine-tree weevil and the leaders of the trees 
affected were cut off and destroyed. Some chestnut trees near the 
terminal chamber of the Weston Aqueduct were found to be affected 
by the chestnut bark disease and were cut down and disposed of. 

The total expenditures for forestal work in the Distribution 
Department amount to about $2,800.00. 



Hydro-electric Service. 
Wachusett Power Station. 

The hydro-electric station at the Wachusett Dam in Clinton was 
operated on 297 days during the year. From January 1 to October 1 
the energy not used in connection with the operation of the Metro- 
politan Water Works was sold to the Connecticut River Transmis- 
sion Company under contract dated September 14, 1910. Since the 
termination of this contract on September 30, 1916, energy has been 
sold to the New England Power Company 1 at the price formerly 
received under the contract, in accordance with an agreement made 
September 30, which provides that until the new contract between 
the Board and the New England Power Company and the Edison 
Electric Illuminating Company of Boston becomes effective, the 
New England Power Company will take as much energy from the 
Wachusett power station as it can reasonably and properly use 
without wasting water at its own plants. Since the beginning of the 
five-year period of the contract with the Connecticut River Trans- 
mission Company the portion of the total quantity of water dis- 
charged into the Wachusett Aqueduct from the Wachusett Reservoir 
that was used for the generation of electric energy has been as 
follows : — 

Per Cent, 

Contract year 1911-1912, 79.5 

Contract year 1912-1913, 83.2 

Contract year 1913-1914, 98.4 

Contract year 1914-1915, 93.5 

Contract year 1915-1916, 77.7 

3 months period ending Dec. 31, 1916, under agreement of Sept. 30, . 92.3 



1 The Connecticut River Transmission Company has been consolidated with the New England Power 
Company. 



82 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

The Wachusett power station statistics for the year 1916 are as 
follows: — 

Total energy developed (kilowatt hours), 6,465,810 

Energy used at power station (kilowatt hours), .... 13,144 



Available energy (kilowatt hours), 6,452,666 

Water used (gallons), 29,626,000,000 

Average head (feet), 99.64 

Energy developed per million foot gallons (kilowatt hours), . 2. 19 

Efficiency of station (per cent.), 69.70 

Credits : — 

Energy sold Connecticut River Transmission 

Company 6,307,200 kilowatt hours at $.0053, $33,428 16 
Labor furnished Connecticut River Transmis- 
sion Company, 32 50 

Energy furnished Clinton sewerage pumping . 
station, 145,466 kilowatt hours at $.0053, . 770 97 

$34,231 63 

Charges : — 

Superintendence, $750 00 

Labor, operating station, 4,431 88 

Repairs and supplies for station, . . . 626 84 

$5,808 72 

Taxes, 3,025 00 

Administration, general supervision, interest and 

sinking fund, 5,800 00 

14,633 72 

Profit, $19,597 91 

Cost of available energy per thousand kilowatt hours, . . . $2,268 

Sudbury Power Station. 
A portion of the hydro-electric machinery at the Sudbury Power 
station was put into regular service on September 14 and the entire 
plant has been in service since November 26. The entire output, 
with the exception of a small amount of energy used for lighting the 
station and operating the electrically driven accessories, has been sold 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 83 

to the Edison Electric Illuminating Company of Boston under a 
contract dated December 21, 1914. The station is not regularly 
operated on Sundays or legal holidays. Between September 14, when 
it was started, and the end of the year the station was operated on 
90 days, and since November 26 all of the water discharged from 
the Sudbury Reservoir has been used for the generation of electric 
energy. 

The Sudbury power station statistics since September 14, 1916, 
when it was put into service, are as follows: — 

Total energy developed (kilowatt hours), . . . . . 1,070,660 
Energy used at power station (kilowatt hours), .... 4,546 

Available energy (kilowatt hours), 1,0^6,114 

Framingham Reservoir No. 3 service: — 

Water used (gallons), . . . 4,778,700,000 

Average head (feet), . . . . 65.70 

Weston Aqueduct service: — 

Water used (gallons), 3,615,540,000 

Average head (feet), . 39.20 

Energy developed per million foot gallons (kilowatt hours), . 2.35 

Efficiency of station (per cent.), 74.80 

Credit: — 

Energy sold Edison Electric Illuminating Company of 
Boston, 1,066,114 kilowatt hours at $.00625, . . . $6,663 21 

Charges: — 

Superintendence, $300 00 

Labor, operating station, 1,844 71 • 

Repairs and supplies for station, . . . 132 82 

$2,277 53 
Administration, general supervision, interest and 
sinking fund, for 3 months, .... 1,325 00 

3,602 53 

Profit (for one quarter year only), $3,060 68 

Cost of available energy per thousand kilowatt hours,. . . $3,379 



84 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 



Distribution Pumping Service. 

The total quantity of water pumped at the five distribution 
pumping stations during the year is 22,039,270,000 gallons, which is 
5,667,030,000 gallons, or 20.45 per cent., less than the quantity 
pumped in 1915, although the total quantity of water supplied to the 
District was 4.3 per cent, greater in 1916 than in 1915. The reduc- 
tion in the quantity of water pumped was due to putting the new 
60-inch Weston Aqueduct Supply Main into service on February 8. 
This increased the quantity of water delivered by gravity into the 
low-service distribution system by about 19,000,000 gallons per day 
and made a corresponding decrease in the quantity pumped for the 
low service after that date. 

The total cost of operating all the stations during the year was 
$97,839.91, which is $992.70 more than in 1915. An analysis of the 
cost of pumping for the various services during the year as compared 
with the cost in 1915 shows a reduction for the low service, due to 
having the new 60-inch Weston Aqueduct Supply Main in service, 
of $2,344.76 for labor and of $2,583.62 for fuel, notwithstanding the 
increased price of coal. The reduction in cost for both of these 
items for the low service is $4,928.38, while there was an increase 
of $1,344.34 for labor and of $1,386.67 for fuel in all of the other 
services, and an increase of $2,557.36 for repairs and of $632.71 for 
oil and supplies in all services, or a total increase of $5,921.08 for 
these items. 

Wages have remained the same during the year as in 1915 but 
there was an increase of from 7 to 11 per cent, in the price of coal 
purchased for the various stations under the 1916 contracts as 
compared with the prices paid under the 1915 contracts. There was 
also a material increase in the price of supplies purchased during 
the year as compared with the prices paid in 1915. 

The amount of coal furnished by various parties at the pumping 
stations and the cost of the coal is as follows: — 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



85 








Stations (Amount in 


Gross Tons). 


Cost per Gross Ton 
in Bins, i 


Dealers. 


K 

73 O 

O 


ra O 


a 
o 

& 

o 

a 

GO 


a 


W) 

ja 

< 


t-c 

03 
ft 

© 


E. Russell Norton, bituminous 


118.75 


- 


- 


- 


- 


S4 49"* 


E. Russell Norton, bituminous, . 


- 


1,679.74 


- 


-. 


- 


4 35 


H. N. Hartwell & Son, Inc., bituminous, 


537.41 


- 


- 


- 


- 


4 16 


H. N. Hartwell & Son, Inc., bituminous, 


- 


2,076.83 


- 


- 


- 


4 05 


C. W. Claflin & Co., anthracite-buckwheat, 


113.44 


- 


- 


- 


- 


3 36 


C. W. Claflin & Co., anthracite-buckwheat, 


- 


284.42 


- 


- 


- 


2 85 


C. W. Claflin & Co., anthracite-buckwheat, 


- 


913.57 


- 


- 


- 


3 02 


Bader Coal Co., bituminous, 


- 


- 


279.49 


- 


- 


5 08 


Hetherington & Co., bituminous, 


- 


- 


267.58 


- 


- 


5 48 


E. Russell Norton, bituminous, .... 


- 


- 


153.40 


- 


- 


6 52 


Locke Coal Co., anthracite-screenings, . 


- 


- 


452.10 


- 


- 


3 00 


Hetherington & Co., bituminous, 


- 


- 


- 


214.38 


- 


4 22 


Garfield & Proctor Coal Co., bituminous, . 


- 


- 


- 


313.59 


- 


4 52 


H. N. Hartwell & Son, Inc., bituminous, . 


- 


- 


- 


- 


45.36 


4 79 


Garfield & Proctor Coal Co., bituminous, . 


- 


- 


- 


- 


51.65 


4 38 


Sawtelle Coal Co., anthracite-screenings, 


- 


- 


- 


- 


9.19 


3 64 


Sawtelle Coal Co., anthracite-screenings, 


- 


- 


- 


- 


95.44 


3 36 


Wm. H. Harlow & Sons, anthracite-screenings, . 


- 


- 


- 


- 


69.19 


3 36 


Total, bituminous, 


656.16 


3,756.57 


700.4? 


527.97 


97.01 


- 


Total, anthracite-buckwheat, 


113.44 


1,197.99 


- 


- 


- 


- 


Total, anthracite-screenings, .... 


- 


- 


452.10 


- 


173.82 


- 


Average cost, bituminous: — 
















S4 22 


$4 18 


S5 55 


S4 40 


$4 57 


- 




4 01 


4 09 


- 


4 30 


4 44 


- 


Average cost, anthracite-buckwheat: — 
















3 36 


2 98 


- 


- 


- 


- 




3 09 


2 89 


- 


- 


- 


- 


Average cost, anthracite-screening?, in bins, 


- 


- 


3£00 


- 


3 37 


- 



1 Includes cost of unloading coal from cars and all expenses incidental to storage of the coal. 



86 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



All bituminous coal was purchased under specifications which 
provide for a variation in price with variation in heat units and ash 
as determined by analysis. The price per ton was reduced 2 cents 
for each 50 heat units or fraction thereof less than 14,700 per pound 
of dry coal, and 1 cent for each J of 1 per cent, or fraction thereof 
of ash in the dry coal in excess of 8 per cent. For each 50 heat 
units or fraction thereof in excess of 14,800 per pound of dry coal 
the price per ton was increased 1 cent. The results of analyses of 
the bituminous coal purchased during 1916 are as follows: — 



Kind of Coal. 


Number 

of Samples 

tested. 


British 

Thermal 

Units. 


Percent- 
age of 
Volatile 
Matter. 


Percent- 
age 
of Ash. 


Percent- 
age of 
Moisture. 


Percent- 
age 
of Fixed 
Carbon. 


Alpha Special, 
Davenport, . 
Brazil Smokeless, 
Peacock, 
New River, . 
Ideal, . 
Wendell, 




29 
23 
9 
9 
5 
1 
1 


14,708 
14,807 
14,376 
14,198 
14,764 
13,935 
14,330 


20.98 
18.86 
20.35 
21.10 
17.03 
17.00 
20.40 


7.04 
6.48 
9.11 

10.22 
6.75 

11.26 
9.23 


4.10 
2.61 
3.13 
2.26 
2.38 
1.94 
1.62 


71.98 
74.66 
70.54 
68.68 
76.22 
71.74 
70.37 



Chestnut Hill Pumping Stations. 

The quantity of water pumped at the Chestnut Hill pumping 
stations into the southern high-service mains averaged 34,371,300 
gallons per day during 1916, or 2,019,300 gallons per day more than 
in 1915. The cost per million gallons of water pumped in 1916 was 
5.45 cents less than during the previous year although the cost of 
pumping for the southern high service in 1916 exceeded the cost in 
1915 by $547.50 for labor, $551.12 for fuel, $259.98 for repairs and 
$365.13 for oil, waste and supplies. 

The southern high-service pumping statistics for 1916 are as 
follows : — 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



87 



Daily pumping capacity (gallons), 
Total quantity pumped (million gallons), 
Daily average quantity pumped (gallons), 
Coal used in pumping (pounds), . 
Gallons pumped per pound of coal, 
Average lift (feet), ...... 

Cost of pumping: — 

Labor, 

Fuel, 

Repairs, 

Oil, waste and packing, 

Small supplies, 

Totals, . . . 

Cost per million gallons pumped, 

Cost per million gallons raised 1 foot high, 

» Operating and care of station. 



Pumping Station No. 1. 



Engines 

Nos. 
1 and 2. 



16,000,000 

156.09 

426,500 

401,085 

389.17 

134.54 

$1,381 98 

1,308 05 

246 88 

12 60 

47 93 



$2,997 44 

$19.2033 
.1427 



Engine 
No. 3. 



20,000,000 

5.48 

15,000 

4,805 

1,140.48 

116.40 

$44 351 

9 12 

7 94 

41 

1 54 



$63 36 

$11.5620 
.0993 



Engine 
No. 4. 



30,000,000 

1,334.27 

3,645,500 

852,810 

1,564.56 

119.56 

$6,003 63i 

1,536 88 

1,072 39 

253 36 

208 23 



$9,074 49 

$6.8011 
.0569 



Pumping 

Station 

No. 2. 



Engine 
No. 12. 



40,000,000 

11,084.07 

30,284,300 

7,417,190 

1,494.38 

124.54 

$11,743 412 

13,228 71 

1,033 80 

340 05 

117 03 



$26,463 00 

$2.3875 
.0192 



Totals. 



106,000,000 

12,579.91 

34,371,300 

8,675,890 

1,449.98 

124.13 

$19,173 37 

16,082 76 

2,361 01 

606 42 

374 73 



$38,598 29 

$3.0682 
.0247 



2 Includes operating labor only. 



The low-service pumping was continued in the same manner as 
during 1915 until February 8, when the new 60-inch Weston Aque- 
duct Supply Main was put into service. During 1915 about 34,- 
000,000 gallons of water per day was supplied to the southern low 
service by gravity from the Weston Aqueduct Supply Mains and 
the remainder of the southern low-service supply and all of the water 
required for the northern districts was pumped at Chestnut Hill 
into the Spot Pond service, the portion supplied to the southern 
low service being by-passed to that service as required, by operating 
the hydraulic valves at the pumping stations. Since February 8 all 
of the water for the Spot Pond service and for a portion of the 
southern low-service supply has been furnished from the Weston 
Aqueduct Supply Mains by gravity, and the remainder of the 
southern low-service supply has been pumped at Chestnut Hill. By 
this arrangement the quantity of water pumped for the low-service 
has been reduced to less than one-half the quantity formerly pumped 
and the head pumped against has been reduced about 8 feet. 



88 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

On account of this change the cost per million gallons of water 
pumped during 1916 is $1.80 more than in 1915, but the cost of 
labor has been reduced $2,344.76, of fuel $2,583.62 and of oil and 
waste $66.55 as compared with the cost in 1915, and the total cost 
of pumping for the low service is $3,980.80 less than during 1915. 

The low-service pumping statistics for 1916 are as follows: — 

Chestnut Hill 
Pumping Station 
# No. 2. — Engines 

Nos. 5, 6 and 7. 

Daily pumping capacity each engine (gallons), .... 35,000,000 

Quantity pumped (gallons) : 

Jan. 1 to Feb. 7, inclusive, .... 1,287,250,000 

Feb. 8 to Dec. 31, inclusive, .... 5,039,700,000 

Total, 6,326,950,000 

Daily average quantity pumped (gallons) : 

Jan. 1 to Feb. 7, inclusive, 33,875,000 

Feb. 8 to Dec. 31, inclusive, 15,365,000 

Total coal used (pounds), 3,217,295 

Gallons pumped per pound of coal, 1,966.54 

Average lift (feet) : 

Jan. 1 to Feb. 7, inclusive, 41.51 

Feb. 8 to Dec. 31, inclusive, 33.70 

Cost of pumping: — 

Labor, $16,804 75 l 

Fuel, 5,612 72 

Repairs, 3,266 11 

Oil, waste and packing, 271 46 

Small supplies, 228 42 

Total, $26,183 46 

Cost per million gallons pumped, $4.1384 

Cost per million foot gallons, .1173 

Spot Pond Pumping Station. 

All of the water supplied to the northern high-service district 
during the year was pumped at the Spot Pond pumping station, 
with the exception of the supply for the towns of Swampscott and 
Nahant from 11.30 a.m. April 23 to 11.30. p.m. April 24, while a 
break in the 16-inch northern high-service main at Fox Hill bridge 
was being repaired. The quantity of water pumped at this station 
averaged 7,106,000 gallons per day during 1916, which is an increase 
of 328,000 gallons per day over the previous year. The total cost of 

1 Includes operating labor and all labor employed in care of Station No. 2. 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



89 



operating the station was $634.38 more while the cost per million 
gallons of water pumped in 1916 was 4.24 cents less than in 1915. 

The northern high-service pumping statistics for 1916 are as 
follows : — 

Total quantity pumped (gallons), 2,600,820,000 

Daily average quantity pumped (gallons), 7,106,000 

Total coal used (pounds), 2,391,339 

Gallons pumped per pound of coal, 1,087.60 

Average lift (feet), .......... 129.06 

Engine No. 8 operated (hours), ......... 94 

Engine No. 9 operated (hours), . . 3,060 

Quantity pumped by Engine No. 8 (gallons), 41,360,000 

Quantity pumped by Engine No. 9 (gallons), 2,559,460,000 

Cost of pumping: — 

Labor, $9,632 74 

Fuel, 4,812 44 

Repairs, 241 16 

Oil, waste and packing, . . 285 40 

Small supplies, 188 24 

Total for station, $15,15998 

Cost per million gallons pumped, $5.8289 

Cost per million foot gallons, . 0452 



Arlington Pumping Station. 

All of the water for the northern extra high-service district was 
pumped at the Arlington pumping station. The quantity pumped 
averaged 797,000 gallons per day, which is an increase of 110,000 
gallons per day, or 16 per cent, over the previous year, and there 
was an increase of $2,196.65, or more than 26 per cent, in the cost of 
operating the station, of which $334.42 was for labor, $536.56 for 
fuel, $1,285.55 for repairs and $40.12 for supplies. 

The northern extra high-service pumping statistics for 1916 are 
as follows : — 



Total quantity pumped (gallons), 

Daily average quantity pumped (gallons), 

Total coal used (pounds), . 

Gallons pumped per pound of coal, 

Average lift (feet), 

Engine No. 10 operated (hours), 

Engine No. 11 operated (hours), 

Quantity pumped by Engine No. 10 (gallons), 

Quantity pumped by Engine No. 11 (gallons), 



291,880,000 

797,000 

1,266,555 

230.45 

281.70 

5,864 

698 

270,850,000 

21,030,000 



90 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

Cost of pumping: — 

Labor, $6,356 12 

Fuel, 2,501 19 

Repairs, 1,573 00 

Oil, waste and packing, 56 39 

Small supplies, 144 93 

Total for station, $10,631 63 

Cost per million gallons pumped, $36.4247 

Cost per million foot gallons, . .1293 



Hyde Park Pumping Station. 

All of the water for the southern extra high-service district was 
pumped at the Hyde Park station. The quantity pumped averaged 
655,000 gallons per day, which is 33,000 gallons per day less than in 
1915, but owing to the increased cost of labor, fuel, repairs and sup- 
plies the total cost of operating the station was $418.74 more than 
during the previous year. 

The southern extra high-service pumping statistics for 1916 are as 
follows: — 



Total quantity pumped (gallons), 

Daily average quantity pumped (gallons), 

Total coal used (pounds), . 

Gallons pumped per pound of coal, 

Average lift (feet), 

Engine No. 13 operated (hours), 

Engine No. 14 operated (hours), 

Quantity pumped by Engine No. 13 (gallons), 

Quantity pumped by Engine No. 14 (gallons), 

Cost of pumping: — 

Labor, 

Fuel, 

Repairs, 

Oil, waste and packing, .... 
Small supplies, 



Total for station, 



Cost per million gallons pumped, 
Cost per million foot gallons, 



239,710,000 

655,000 

560,753 

427.48 

131.00 

3,554 

732 

193,660,000 

46,050,000 



$5,797 17 
995 56 
166 62 
114 17 
193 03 

$7,266 55 

$30.3139 
.2314 



Additional information regarding the operation of the pumping 
engines at the various stations is given on pages 165 to 174. 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



91 



Distribution Reservoirs. 
The locations, capacities and elevations of the distribution reservoirs 
of the Metropolitan Water Works are shown by the following 
table : — 



Distribution Reservoirs and Locations. 



Elevation of 1 
High Water. 



Capacity in 
Gallons. 



Low Service: — 
Spot Pond, Stoneham and Medford, .... 
Chestnut Hill Reservoir, Brighton District of Boston, 

Weston Reservoir, Weston, 

Mystic Reservoir, Medford, 



Northern High Service: — 
Fells Reservoir, Stoneham, 
Bear Hill Reservoir, Stoneham, . 

Northern Extra High Service: — 
Arlington Standpipe, Arlington, 

Southern High Service: — 
Fisher Hill Reservoir, Brookline, 
Waban Hill Reservoir, Newton, . 
Forbes Hill Reservoir, Quincy, . 
Forbes Hill Standpipe, Quincy, . 



163.00 
134.00 
200.00 
157.00 

271.00 
300.00 

442.00 



1,791,700,000 

300,000,000 

200,000,000 

26,200,000 

41,400,000 
2,450,000 

550,000 



Southern Extra High Service: — 
Bellevue Reservoir Steel Tank, West Roxbury District of Boston, 
Total, . • . 



251.00 


15,500,000 


264.50 


13,500,000 


192.00 


5,100,000 


251.00 


330,000 


375.00 


2,500,000 


- 


2,399,230,000 



1 Elevation in feet above Boston City Base. 

By arrangement with the city of Chelsea a portion of the main- 
tenance of its reservoir on Powder Horn Hill is assumed by the 
department, and the reservoir is used by the department when 
necessary in connection with the supplying of water to the northern 
high-service district. This reservoir has a capacity of 1,000,000 
gallons with high-water line at elevation 196.6. The reservoir was 
in service from January 1 to April 10 and was kept full for emergency 
use during the remainder of the year. 

Water is delivered into the Chestnut Hill Reservoir from the 
storage reservoirs by gravity and is pumped from that reservoir for 
the low-service and southern high-service districts. 



92 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

Water is delivered from the Sudbury Reservoir through the 
Weston Aqueduct by gravity and is then supplied to the low-service 
works through the Weston Aqueduct Supply Mains by gravity. 

Water for the northern high-service district is pumped from Spot 
Pond to the Fells and Bear Hill reservoirs. For the northern extra 
high-service district it is pumped from the low-service pipe lines to 
the steel tank at Arlington Heights and for the southern extra high- 
service it is pumped from the southern high-service pipe lines to the 
Bellevue Reservoir. 

Weston Reservoir. 

At the Weston Reservoir the inlet chamber, open channel, reservoir 
lands and screen chamber were cared for with the usual force, and 
the walks, driveways, drains and fences were given the necessary 
attention. 

Since the Sudbury power station was put into service in Sep- 
tember, the elevation of the water in the reservoir has been allowed 
to vary through a considerable range in order to utilize the water 
supplied to the best advantage for the generation of electric energy. 
To insure the satisfactory operation of the works in this manner a 
private telephone and electric recording gage service was installed 
between the screen chamber and the attendant's residence on Newton 
Street. 

As it was considered desirable to dispose of the department house 
on Ash Street it was sold at public auction on July 6, and was later 
moved off the Water Works land. 

The driveway leading' to the screen chamber from Newton Street 
was resurfaced with pea stone and four concrete posts were set at 
the entrance so that it could be closed to the public whenever the 
attendant is not on duty by means of chains stretched between the 
posts. 

Sixteen new screens were provided for use at the screen chamber 
to replace the old screens which were no longer suitable for use. 

Chestnut Hill, Fisher Hill and Waban Hill Reservoirs. 

The regular work of caring for the gate-houses and screens, shrubs, 
walks, drives and grounds at the Chestnut Hill, Fisher Hill and 
Waban Hill reservoirs was attended to as usual. 

The portion of the driveway between the Lawrence and Bradlee 
basins at the Chestnut Hill Reservoir included within the boundaries 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 93 

of the Water Works property, and having an area of about 8,000 
square yards, was resurfaced with tarvia macadam at a cost of $0.25 
per square yard. Broken stone for this work was obtained from the 
storage pile at the east portal of the pressure tunnel on the line of 
the 60-inch Weston Aqueduct Supply Main, the only expense in 
connection therewith being for teaming. The old wooden fence 
along Beacon Street south of Bradlee basin was replaced with a new 
fence consisting of 8-inch x 8-inch concrete posts spaced 10 feet on 
centres with 2-inch iron pipe rails for a length of 1,572 feet, at a 
cost of $0.90 per linear foot. 

During the latter part of the summer foundations were constructed 
by the department force for a garage which is being built near the 
stable at the Chestnut Hill Reservoir for the department auto- 
mobiles, in accordance with the new regulations of the Fire Preven- 
tion Commissioner. A contract for the superstructure of the garage 
was made with Crowley & Hickey of Boston on September 29. 
The basis of award was $8,018 and about 25 per cent, of the work 
was completed at the end of the year. The garage will be a one- 
story structure about 17 feet in height with a main room on the 
front about 22 feet wide x 60 feet in length with a turntable 15 feet 
in diameter in the centre of the room opposite the entrance and 
space for two automobiles on each side of the entrance. The rear 
portion of the building is about 21 feet wide x 54 feet in length and 
is subdivided into office rooms, repair room, wash room, storage 
room and a room for the heating plant. The exterior of the front 
portion of the building is of Weymouth seam face granite with pean 
hammered split seam face and brick trimmings, and the exterior of 
the rear portion of the building is of red brick. The building will 
have an artificial stone cornice and a flat reinforced concrete slab 
roof supported by 12-inch I beams and covered with tar and gravel 
roofing. All exterior walls are to be backed with 8-inch interlocking 
tile. The partition walls are to be of concrete. 

The Lawrence basin of the Chestnut Hill Reservoir which had 
been shut off and not used in connection with the operation of the 
water works since October 10, 1913, because of the stagnation which 
occurred with no flow into it from the Cochituate Aqueduct, was 
put into service again May 8, and circulation has been maintained 
by arranging the gates and stop-planks so that some of the water 
from the Sudbury Aqueduct flows through it in a reverse direction 



94 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

from the normal flow when the Cochituate Aqueduct is in service. 
Under the present arrangement only a sufficient quantity of water 
to maintain circulation in the conduits is allowed to flow directly 
from the terminal chamber to the pump wells and about 35 per 
cent, of the remainder flows into the Lawrence basin, passes through 
a short section of the Cochituate Aqueduct and enters the Bradlee 
basin at the intermediate gate-house. The rest of the water is dis- 
charged directly into the Bradlee basin from the terminal chamber, 
and substantially all of the water pumped is now drawn from this 
basin. 

The pumping stations and the stable at Chestnut Hill Reservoir 
were kept in repair and the lawns and grounds in the vicinity were 
kept in good condition. 

Spot Pond, Fells and Bear Hill Reservoirs. 

The usual attention was given to the gate-houses and screens at 
Spot Pond, Fells and Bear Hill reservoirs and to the protection of 
the trees and care of the Water Works lands at Spot Pond. A new 
motor boat of the V bottom runabout type, 21 feet in length, with 
5 feet beam and 4 cylinder, 4 cycle Hermann engine was purchased 
to replace the old motor boat which was in unsatisfactory condition 
and was disposed of in connection with the purchase of the new boat. 

Analyses made by the State Department of Health of the water 
from the spring at Porter Cove at the south end of the pond, which 
was used freely by many of the visitors, showed that it was unfit for 
drinking purposes, and when notified of the results the Metropolitan 
Park Commission removed the pump and stopped all use of the 
water on September 2. 

The basement of the house on the east shore of the pond, owned 
by the department, was cleaned and whitewashed and additional 
lockers were installed therein for the use of the water works patrol- 
men. Minor repairs were made at the barn. The interior of the 
gate-houses and the boat-house and tool-house were painted. The 
lawn at the pumping station was regraded and seeded. 

Arlington, Bellevue, Forbes Hill and Mystic Reservoirs. 

The Arlington standpipe was drained for examination on October 
3 and a layer of silt about 2 inches in depth was removed from the 
bottom. The inspection showed that it would be necessary to paint 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 95 

the tank at an early date. It was refilled and put into service 
October 6, and some repairs were made on the stairs leading to the 
top of the tank. The grounds about the standpipe are cared for by 
the Public Works Department of the town of Arlington under an 
agreement with this department. 

At the beginning of the year the Bellevue Reservoir was out of 
service in connection with the construction of the masonry tower 
around the tank. Water was turned into the reservoir on April 17 
and it was put into regular service on April 20. In October the 
16-inch connection with the Boston Water Works mains was made 
and 125 feet of 12-inch Boston Water Works main was lowered to 
conform to the grade in front of the reservoir. 

The standpipe at Forbes Hill has been in service throughout the 
year and the reservoir has been kept full of water for emergency use. 
The gate-house has been cleaned and painted and the concrete lining 
of the reservoir has been repaired near high-water line, where injured 
by ice. The iron stairway leading to the top of the tower was 
scraped and painted. 

The Mystic Reservoir was not in service during the year but was 
kept full of water for emergency use. The steps leading to the top 
of the embankment were painted and the roadway and walk were 
repaired where necessary. 

Mystic Lake, Conduit and Pumping Station and Grounds at Arlington 
and Hyde Park Pumping Stations. 

Although the Mystic Lake, conduit and pumping station are no 
longer in use for water supply they have received such attention as is 
necessary to maintain them in proper condition. At the lake the 
gate-house was painted, the bridge at the dam was repaired and the 
stone masonry abutments and piers were pointed. Fence posts were 
set along the boundary line of the water works land on the west 
shore of the lake for a distance of 1,284 feet and Wheelock wire 
fencing was strung for a distance of 458 feet. The fence will be 
completed as soon as the remainder of the wire is available. 

At the premises near the pumping station the barn was painted 
and the stable was repaired and is ready for painting. 

The lawns, shrubs, walks and drives at the Arlington and Hyde 
Park pumping stations have been kept in good condition. 



96 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 



Distribution Pipe Lines. 

The length of the distribution pipe lines owned and operated by 
the department at the close of the year is 122.27 miles, an increase 
of 0.03 of a mile during the year. 

In connection with the maintenance of the pipe lines they have 
been regularly patrolled and the work of municipalities and public 
service corporations in the vicinity of the pipe lines has been in- 
spected. The location of each valve chamber has been plainly 
stencilled on objects along the lines so that any valve can be found 
readily when desired. The valves have been kept in good working 
condition, and valve chambers have been cleaned and the frames and 
covers have been regulated to conform to grades of the streets where 
necessary. The covers over important valves have been covered 
with salt during cold weather to keep them free from ice. 

The 60-inch Weston Aqueduct Supply Main in Commonwealth 
Avenue in Newton, between the Charles River and Valentine Street 
was tested in January and put into service February 8. The work 
of repairing several lawns and a tennis court which were damaged 
by the break which occurred in November, 1915, in the 48-inch 
Weston Aqueduct Supply Main, which could not be done satis- 
factorily last year was completed early in the spring. 

On the Clinton Road 48-inch pipe line in Brookline the fence 
which was partially constructed last year, to enclose the water 
works land, was completed and the land was graded and seeded. 
The work of repairing the damage claimed to have been caused to 
property at No. 171 Clinton Road by the break which occurred in 
this line in December, 1913, was completed during the year to the 
satisfaction of the owner, with the exception of slight repairs to a 
concrete driveway and the cement plaster on the house, which will 
be completed as soon as the weather is favorable. 

A 36-inch valve was set in the 48-inch low-service Longwood 
Avenue line at Coolidge Corner, Brookline, in April, so that the 
portion of this line between the Chestnut Hill Reservoir and Coolidge 
Corner can be used on the Boston or the Spot Pond service, as 
desired. The cost of the work was $1,714.22. 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 97 



Pipe Bridges. 

During the year repairs were made to the pipe bridges over steam 
railroad tracks at Chestnut Hill Avenue, Brookline; College Avenue, 
Medford; Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, and Walnut Street, 
Somerville. Minor repairs were made to the pipe box at the Chelsea 
North Bridge over the Mystic River and the exterior of the bridge 
over the Mystic River at Governors Avenue, Medford, was painted. 

Pipe Yards. 
Pipe yards have been maintained at the Chestnut Hill Reservoir 
and near the Glen wood Station of the Boston & Maine Railroad in 
Medford as in former years. At the Chestnut Hill yard the floor of 
the long open shed Was surfaced with cinders and is now used for 
storing the materials from the carriage shed which was torn down to 
provide space for the new garage. At the Glenwood yard minor 
repairs were made to the buildings, all the woodwork was painted 
and the valve shed was completed. 

Meters, Regulating Valves and Recording Pressure Gages. 

There are now 68 Venturi meters varying in size from 6 inches to 
60 inches in diameter; 5 Hersey detector meters, 3 Hersey disc 
meters and 1 Hersey torrent meter connected with the distribution 
mains, which, with the exception of 10 of the Venturi meters, were 
used for measuring the water supplied to the various municipalities 
in the Metropolitan Water District. In connection with the opera- 
tion of these meters two men were employed continuously during 
the year. The Venturi meter registers were read and the clocks 
were wound twice each week, and they were given such additional 
attention as was necessary to keep them in repair and operating 
satisfactorily. 

There are now 8 pressure regulating valves installed in the distri- 
bution mains for reducing the pressure of the water supplied to 
portions of Chelsea, East Boston and Hyde Park and to Nahant, 
Revere, Swampscott and Winthrop. They have received the usual 
attention and have controlled the pressures in a satisfactory manner. 
The regulating valve at Beach Street, Revere, was in service from 



98 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

December 22 to the end of the year, while the Winthrop valve was 
being repaired. 

Recording pressure gages have been maintained at 22 stations on 
the Metropolitan Water Works, and the table on pages 198 and 199, 
showing the elevation of the hydraulic grade line in feet above 
Boston City Base at 19 of these stations for each month during the 
year has been prepared from the charts. 

Breaks and Leaks. 

On April 23 a break occurred in the 16-inch northern high-service 
main at the Fox Hill Bridge on the north side of the Saugus River 
in Lynn. The break was caused by the settlement of the pipe upon 
the stone abutment of the bridge, where the ground had been dis- 
turbed by the work of rebuilding the bridge in 1912. The pipe line 
which supplies water for Nahant and Swampscott was out of service 
from 11.30 a.m. April 23 to 11.30 p.m. April 24, and during this time 
water was furnished to these towns from the Lynn Water Works 
through the emergency connection at the junction of Broad and 
Washington streets. The cost of repairing the break was $211.36 
and $52.11 was paid to the city of Lynn for 521,100 gallons of water 
furnished while the pipe line was out of service. 

There were 58 leaks repaired in the distribution mains during the 
year at a cost of $1,643.16. Of these leaks 12 were at wooden 
insulating joints, which were repaired at a cost of $258.94. The 
services of a diver were required for repairing three leaks which were 
discovered in the 36-inch submerged pipe line under the Charles 
River at the Magazine Street crossing, in January. The cost of this 
work was $408.47. 

Leaks occurred under the Boston & Albany Railroad tracks at the 

Longwood, Allston and Cottage Farm crossings, and under the 

Boston & Maine Railroad tracks at Washington Street, Maiden, 

and Second Street, Everett. At the Longwood crossing it was 

necessary to support the tracks with timbers before the excavation 

was made, and the cost of the work at this place was $200.33. 
» 

Emergency Pipe Line Service. 

Two J-ton auto trucks, equipped with special bodies and gate 
operating attachments, were put into service early in the summer 
for operating valves quickly in case of emergency. One of the 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 99 

trucks is stationed at the Chestnut Hill pipe yard in Brighton, for 
the southern division, and the other is stationed at the Glenwood 
pipe yard in Medford, for the northern division of the distribution 
pipe system, and men are kept on duty ready to operate the trucks 
in case of emergency at any time during the day or night. 

Consumption of Water. 

The total quantity of water furnished to the 18 municipalities 
supplied from the Metropolitan Water Works during the year, as 
measured by the water works meters, was 38,919,623,000 gallons, 
which is equivalent to an average consumption of 106,337,800 
gallons per day. On the basis of an estimated population of 
1,190,220 this is equivalent to a consumption of 89 gallons per capita 
per day. The increase of one gallon per capita, or about ly per cent., 
in the average daily per capita consumption during 1916 over the 
consumption in 1915 appears to be due largely to climatic and 
industrial conditions and is probably only temporary. 

From an inspection of the consumption diagrams following page 
100 it appears probable that a further reduction in the per capita 
consumption will result from the installation of additional meters. It 
also appears to be possible to make an appreciable reduction in con- 
sumption by taking measures to detect and reduce the leakage from 
the main pipes. 

The average daily consumption of water in each of the munici- 
palities supplied from the Metropolitan Water Works during 1915 
and 1916, as measured by the Metropolitan Water Works meters, 
is as follows : — 



100 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 











Estimated 

Popula- 
tion, 1916. 




Average 


Daily Consumption. 






1915. 


1916. 






Gallons. 


Gallons 

per 
Capita. 


Gallons. 


Gallons 

per 
Capita. 


Increase 
in 

Gallons. 


Boston, 


762,700 


77,651,800 


104 


80,358,800 


105 


2,707,000 


Somerville, 








89,190 


5,807,100 


67 


6,183,600 


69 


376,500 


Maiden, . 








50,160 


2,243,000 


46 


2,460,200 


49 


217,200 


Chelsea, . 








45,020 


2,901,400 


66 


3,070,900 


68 


169,500 


Everett, . 








38,870 


2,599,100 


68 


2,891,400 


74 


292,300 


Quincy, . 








42,030 


2,511,800 


61 


2,499,400 


59 


12,400* 


Medford, . 








32,080 


1,245,200 


40 


1,487,000 


46 


241,800 


Melrose, . 








17,260 


851,500 


50 


781,800 


45 


69,700 » 


Revere, . 








26,790 


1,484,800 


58 


1,591,200 


59 


106,400 


Watertown, 








17,280 


1,025,200 


62 


1,125,500 


65 


100,300 


Arlington, 








15,670 


825,300 


55 


929,400 


59 


104,100 


Milton, 








8,850 


338,900 


39 


371,300 


42 


32,400 


Winthrop, 








13,470 


700,300 


54 


707,800 


53 


7,500 


Stoneham, 








7,590 


373,700 


50 


437,900 


58 


64,200 


Belmont, . 








8,560 


425,400 


52 


447,800 


52 


22,400 


Lexington, 








5,680 


358,700 


64 


389,400 


69 


30,700 


Nahant, . 








1,440 


161,900 


116 


159,000 


110 


2,900i 


Swampscott, . 








7,580 


436,400 


59 


445,400 


59 


9,000 


District, 


1,190,220 


101,941,500 


88 


106,337,800 


89 


4,396,300 



1 Decrease. 



The average consumption in the several districts was as follows: 



Southern low-service district, embracing the low-service district of 
Boston, with the exception of Charlestown and East Boston, . 

Northern low-service district, embracing the low-service districts 
of Somerville, Chelsea, Maiden, Medford, Everett, Arlington, 
Charlestown and East Boston, 

Southern high-service district, embracing Quincy and Watertown, 
the high-service districts of Boston, and portions of Belmont 
and Milton, 

Northern high-service district, embracing Melrose, Revere, Win- 
throp, Swampscott, Nahant and Stoneham, and the high-service 
districts of Somerville, Chelsea, Maiden, Medford, Everett and 
East Boston, > . 

Southern extra high-service district, embracing the higher portions 
of Hyde Park, Milton and West Roxbury, .... 

Northern extra high-service district, embracing Lexington and the 
higher portions of Arlington and Belmont, .... 

Totals, 



Gallons 

per Day, 

1916. 



42,132,900 
21,338,400 
33,766,200 

7,643,600 
656,000 
800,700 



106,337,800 



Increase prom 1915. 



Gallons 
per Day. 



156,500 
1,909,700 
1,990,800 

245,400 
12,0001 
105,900 



4,396,300 



Percent- 
age. 



0.37 
9. S3 

6.27 

3.32 
1.801 

15.24 



4.31 



1 Decrease. 



AVERAGE RATE OF CONSUMPTION OF WATER 
IN THE METROPOLITAN WATER DISTRICT 
FOR THE. ENTIRE DAY 

AND 

FOR THREE HOURS BETWEEN 1 AND 4 AT NIGHT 






X 



160 



150 



140 



>.130 

CD 
Q 



CO LU 

o > 

CO LU 



Z 

x 



5 < £ 

« CO 2 

U-J I] UJ 

2 uj H- 

O 3= < 

co o 5: 



O 






~ > 

3 u-i 



S 2 O F- 

o <c 2 tz 

u to r (£ z 

a: a uj r o 

s S t 2 

^ O 2 _j 

CO CO ^ CO 



O UJ 

Z DC (rt 7 

LU O O ~ 

Ck u. OC O 

_j a _i n 

<C LU UJ _ 

S S S 2 



120 



CD 
Q_ 



ca 



S* 100 
O 

fc 90 
S 80 
1 70 



60 

.2 50 
a. 
I 40 

CO 

c 
O 30 

° 20 

a 10 



Dec.31,1908 
Dec.31,1916 



Average for the District for the Entire Day 1908 



Average for the District for three hours 



160 



150 



140 



130 >* 

(0 

a 

120 u 
cp 




Average Rate of Consumption for Entire Day, 1916 {?ffff 

» " ■ « " between 1 and 4 at night, 1916. . R3£S&a 

Average Rate of Consumption for Entire Day, 1908 

- ■■ between 1 and 4 at night, 1908. r 



POPULATION . CONSUMPTION OF WATER and PER CENT OF SERVICES METERED 

IN THE 

METROPOLITAN WATER DISTRICT 
AS SUPPLIED IN 1916 
FROM 1890 TO 1916 




1920 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



101 



•9161 
'18 jaqtnaoaQ paia^aui 

SaOIAjag JO '1UQQ J8<J 



'9161 '18 
jaquiaoaQ as£i ui sia^aj\[ 



'9I6T '18 J3q 
•raaoaQ asQ ut saoiAiag 



i ^ t "i*~i c i.°9.< 

r* cs t>" uo co oo co ■»* eo cm pa cm cm i-h »h rH 



HHoiNooooawfflTtieNWMOitiN 
co ^_o HaiNTtioioososoianooiMt-oo 
-5f?eo oououoos <o* ^cMCMrHCMrHrHrH i-T 

O rH 



CO 

5? 



a 



55 



o 

OC7> 



l»3 0> 






NOiHOJCqO>OOM»>-tlOQONl(5NC<l(ON 
lOtOrHlOlOMH-H^MNCqHOiHOMO 

HOOOOO »NO> UO rH CM t» OS CM OS •* CM CO 

cMcMrHrH cmcm r-TrHrH 



t--OOt--COuO"rJl<MUOOUOOS-'<*<OrHcMOSC©00 
OOtOOOiCOOrHOJOiOtllOONINOiOH* 
NN rH OMtHiHMCqH CM 



lfllM'*Ci5NlOtOOOOSCCCO'»((N'*ICCCOO! 
COC6INOCOCNllNOOsmrHINTj(NrtMHW 
OO NOS OS t~ CO 00 OO CO OO O CO 00 CM !>• •* CM UO 

OrH cM"rH »-T »-7 



fflMOOONOtOQOOMQOWOMONHN 
ONK5 00H UO-rJI.cM t—0005CM0005CM»-ICOO 
■>*OSrHOOSC©cMt~-l>-©t-H>.OOCMOSUOcMCO 
UO r-TrHrH CO* CM iHHi-T 



UO©t~-COOSCOCO(--C©COrH-r)<OrHeqCOCOOO 
NOOOlOOOONClTtKCi-lONINOiOrtCO 
COCM r-t -rJfCO r- IHNH CM 



C0cMt--COcM'<Hr^C0cNrHa0cMrHI>-rHCD-rt»CO 
Nt^OOSOOcMOOCOcDa»OSC©OOcMt>--r*cMUO 



CO rH 



•9I6T '18 
jaqraaoaQ o% saoiAiag 
PIO no ^as aq o% pajmfo 
-aa siaqaj^ jo jaqxnn^i 



OOHOOOOOhhm I UO I OK5 I O0-H/IO5 

OOOse<JcOcOt--wHt— rj< OS OOO O0"*O0 

N(OhhnO®ON ■<* OS U0 .CM rH rH 

OOCO cMCMCMrHr-rrH 



go 
« 

« 
H 
GO 



o 

o 

H 



H 

w 



o 
H 



-r>< no O rH OO rH UO CM CO I t* I CMCM I O0UOI>. 

OS rH CM O rH CO CO OS CO CO i-H© U0CO"«* 

N NH O^M ■* 18 K5 ffl CS ©CO "SCM-"*" 

<0-& CO CM^COCMi-* rHrH 



CMtl I NNtOHi 

Oco Mih 

OOt* CM 



00© I COUOrH I CM OO I I I -r^OO I t~C0 I 
rHCO fHCM rHrH t~ CD IO 

TJ* ■** CM CM 






OOONCOiONN I N | O | I OS I ^ t* 
OO coco-* «o •* 00 

CO U0 CM CO rH CO rH 



CMO0 I NWOtO I ■* I rH | I CM I ION I 
CM 00 COrHOS U0 CO U0 © rH 

©■<* HNO rH CM CM 



t^. O CM CM U0 o oo uo CO I t>. I COUO I coooco 

00t- OSOOOOt- t>- CM U0 COrHl-H 

^ U0 © CM CO rH i-l rH rH 

CO rH i-H 



rtrtMOlNWIONO I CO | COCO | CO CO 00 
OOO t>.«^CM>0 rH CO O00 uo CM CM 
-* uo N CM rf< uo .-I N rH 



Mi-tNCOiOMSiOi)( I CO I UOU0 I O O CM 
O CM CO U0 U0 CO CM CO OO O t«- CM t^ ■* Tf< 
U0CO t>. CM OS »-l »-! OJCM r-l 



niNMOOCOOONlNlO I 00 | COCO I COOt* 

OO CO •* Ol CO U0 U0 CO OO O »-H rH <-H CO CO 

t>- rHCOCOOO-* »-H CMi-H rH CM 



•j^aj^ qoBg saotAjag 
pjO n ° *as aq o^. pajmb 
-aj eaa^aj^ jo jaquin^j 



H O 



CO rH T* O CM O OS OJ 00 | UO I OUO I CMCOrH 
*>• rH rH •* UO CO t>- rH CO UO OCO CO rH CM 

CM T* CMCMCMrHrHrH rH 




m&SowaSSpH^s^cQm^co" 






2 


T5 






a 


CU 






CD 


Oi 






A 


3 






+J 


CJ 






'(J 

d 


o 








>1 


uo 










UO 


TJ 


+J 


o 




a 


rH 


OS 




0) 






C5 




CO 


r-T 


50 

ri 


a 


ci 






I-. 


cy 


O 


TO 




Q 


cy 


a> 


A) 


Ti 






^ 


a> 


T- 


si 

CO 




CU 




bJJ 

a 


a 

CU 


o 
a 


'•B 






t*1 


2 





-rS 


o 


rl 


5 






OS 


S3 
to 


rU 


X. 


IH 


co 


g 


->-> 


IT) 


qp 


P 

a 




0> 


Cl> 


■U 


-d 


-s 


a 


3 


3 


01 

XI 

H 


3 


o 


5 


-^ 


fl 


c 


CU 


r- 1 


l-H 




en 








O 

a 


M 





102 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. L)oc . 

a 

Installation of Meters on Service Pipes. 

Information regarding the installation of meters on service pipes to 
December 31, 1916, by the municipalities supplied with water from 
the Metropolitan Water Works is given in the table on page 101. 

Chapter 524 of the Acts of the year 1907 requires that in these 
municipalities meters shall be set each year on all new service pipes 
and on 5 per cent, of all service pipes that were without meters on 
December 31, 1907. All of the municipalities have complied with 
the provision that meters shall be set on 5 per cent, of the service 
pipes that were without meters on December 31, 1907, and in 11 
cases the number of meters set on old service pipes materially 
exceeds the requirement of the statute. In regard to the installation 
of meters on new service pipes, the provision of the statute has not 
been strictly complied with by several of the municipalities. This is 
partly accounted for by the fact that new service pipes are fre- 
quently installed when building operations are begun and the meters 
are not set until the buildings are permanently occupied. As the 
total number of meters set on both old and new service pipes in 
each of the municipalities is equal to or exceeds the total number of 
meters required by the statute to be set to December 31, 1916, it 
would seem that although the provisions of the statute have not 
been carried out exactly as specified the purpose of the law has been 
accomplished. 

During the year 4140 service pipes and 10,845 nieters were in- 
stalled in the 18 municipalities supplied from the Metropolitan 
Water Works and at the close of the year 179,919 service pipes and 
127,407 meters were in use; 70.81 per cent, of all the service pipes 
had been provided with meters and in 8 of the municipalities all of 
the service pipes were equipped with meters. 

Water Supplied Outside of Metropolitan Water District. 

During the year 411,686,000 gallons of water were supplied from 
the Metropolitan Water Works for use outside of the Metropolitan 
Water District as follows : — 



No. 57j 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



103 



Places supplied. 



Total 
Quantity 
(Gallons). 



Average 

Quantity 

(Gallons 

per Day). 1 



Number of 

Days on 

which Water 

was 

supplied. 



Amounts 

charged 

for Water 

supplied. 



Westborough State Hospital, . 
Town of Framingham: — 

From Sudbury Aqueduct, . 

From Filter-gallery at Farm Pond, 
United States Government: — 

Peddock's Island, 
Town of Saug\is, 



62,972,000 

86,100,000 
230,300,000 

25,292,000 
7,022,000 



172,000 

235,246 
629,235 

69,100 
19,200 



366 

339 
366 

366 
366 



$1,989 16 



2,506 86 



1,585 99 
400 00 



1 For the entire year. 

Quality of the Watek. 

The yearly average results of the chemical analyses made by the 
State Department of Health, and of the biological and bacteriological 
examinations, made in the Metropolitan Water Works laboratory, of 
water from service taps in Boston since 1898 are given in tables on 
pages 187 to 190. 

Engineering. 

In connection with the maintenance of the works the engineering 
force has made plans, estimates and reports for various projects and 
improvements; has made record plans of water works lands and 
structures, surveys and plans of sanitary conditions at premises on 
the watersheds and for land purchases and takings; has tested 
meters; made photographs, blueprints and analyses of coal and oil; 
calculated yields of watersheds; made current meter gagings; kept 
hydraulic and meteorological records; summarized power station and 
pumping station records; cared for the recording pressure gages and 
supervised various operations carried on by the department. 

Appended to this report are tables giving additional information 
relating to the operations of the Metropolitan Water Works for the 
year 1916 and the usual water works statistics. 



Respectfully submitted, 



Boston, January 1, 1917. 



WILLIAM E. FOSS, 

Chief Engineer. 



104 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 



REPORT OF CHIEF ENGINEER OF SEWERAGE 

WORKS. 



To the Metropolitan Water and Sewerage Board. 

Gentlemen: — The following report of the operations of the 
Metropolitan Sewerage Works for the year ending December 31, 
1916, is respectfully submitted: — 

Organization. 

The Chief Engineer has charge of the design and construction of 
all new works, and of the maintenance and operation of all the works 
controlled by the Metropolitan Water and Sewerage Board for re- 
moving sewage from the twenty-six municipalities which comprise 
the Metropolitan Sewerage Districts. 

The following assistants have been employed during the year: — - 

Henry T. Stiff, .< Division Engineer, in charge of of- 
fice and drafting room and of the 
construction work. 

Clarence A. Moore, Assistant Engineer, in charge of 

maintenance studies and records 
and of construction work on the 
North Metropolitan System. 

Arthur F. F. Haskell, Assistant Engineer, in charge of 

survey work and field work in 
connection with the Wellesley 
extension construction. 

Ralph W. Loud, Assistant Engineer, in charge of 

survey work and field work in 
connection with the Reading ex- 
tension construction. 

George W. Wood, Assistant Engineer, on Maiden 

River siphon and Deer Island 
extension. 

In addition to the above, the number of engineering and other 
assistants employed during the year was 23, which includes 3 in- 
strumentmen, 10 inspectors, 2 draftsmen, 6 rodmen and engineering 
assistants and 2 stenographers. 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



105 



METROPOLITAN SEWERAGE DISTRICTS. 
Areas and Populations. 

During the year the town of Reading has been admitted to the 
North Metropolitan Sewerage District, as provided in Chapter 159 
of the General Acts of 1916. 

The populations of the districts, as given in the following table, 
are based on the census of 1915. 

Table showing Ultimate Contributing Areas and Present Estimated Populations 
within the Metropolitan Sewerage Districts, as of December SI, 1916. 



City or Town. 



Area (Square 
Miles). 



Estimated 
Population. 



2-S 



a 
I 

•3 .a 

i 



Arlington, 

Belmont, 

Boston (portions of), 

Cambridge, . 

Chelsea, 

Everett, 

Lexington, 1 . 

Maiden, 

Medford, 

Melrose, 

Reading, 

Revere, 

Somerville, . 

Stoneham, . 

Wakefield, . 

Winchester, . 

Winthrop, 

Woburn, 



Boston (portions of), 
Brookline, . 
Dedham,* . 
Milton, . 
Newton, 
Quincy, 
Waltham, 
Watertown, . 
Wellesley, 



Totals, 



5.20 
4.66 
3.45 
6.11 
2.24 
3.34 
5.11 
5.07 
8.35 
3.73 
9.82 
5.86 
3.96 
5.50 
7.65 
5.95 
1.61 
12.71 



24.96 

6.81 

9.40 

12.59 

16.88 

12.56 

13.63 

4.04 



100.32 



110.76 



211.08 



15,980 

8,750 

108,310 

110,770 

45,660 

39,330 

4,080 
50,660 
32,710 
17,410 

7,160 
27,430 
90,120 

7,630 
13,240 
10,390 
13,750 
16,690 



257,550 
35,280 
11,490 

8,950 
44,300 
42,570 
31,050 
17,590 

6,850 



620,070 



455,630 



1,075,700 



1 Part of town. 



106 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



METROPOLITAN SEWERS. 

Sewers Purchased and Constructed and their Connections. 

During the year there have been built 2.654 miles of Metropolitan 
sewer within the sewerage districts, so that there are now 111.484 
miles of Metropolitan sewers. Of this total, 9.642 miles of sewers, 
with the Quincy pumping station, have been purchased from cities 
and towns of the districts, the remaining 101.842 miles of sewers and 
other works having been constructed by the Metropolitan boards. 

The locations, lengths and sizes of these sewers are given in the 
following tables, together with other data referring to the public and 
special connections with the systems : — 



North Metropolitan Sewerage System. 
Location, Length and Sizes of Sewers, with Public and Special Connections. 







B 

O 


ii 

0> G . 


Special Connections. 






9 






.Sd 


City or Town. 


Size of Sewers. 


.2 
jd 


8«~. 


Character or Location of 


o 






§ 


ubli( 
tion 
ber 


Connection. 


So. 






hJ 


Ph 




fc 


Boston: — 












Deer Island, 


4'0"to9'0", 


1.613 


4 


Shoe factory, .... 


1 


East Boston, 


9'0"tol'0", 


5.467 


25 


Middlebrook Wool-combing 

Co 

Navy Yard, .... 


1 

8 


Charlestown, 


6'7"X7'5"tol , 0", . 


3.292 


14 1 


Almshouse, .... 


1 








> 


Private building, . 

Club house, .... 


1 
1 


Winthrop, 


9'0", 


2.864 


13 

• 


Fire Department Station, 
Private building, . 

Rendering works, . 


1 
1 
1 
1 


Chelsea, 


8' 4"X9' 2" to 15", 


5.230 


13- 


Metropolitan Water Works 
blow-off, . 

Chelsea Water Works blow- 
off, ...'. . 

Metropolitan Water Works 
blow-off, .... 

Cameron Appliance Co., 

Shultz-Goodwin Co., 


1 

2 

1 

1 

1 


Everett, 


8' 2"X8' 10" to 4' 8"X5' 1", 


2.925 


7- 


Andrews-Wasgatt Co., . 
National Metallic Bed Co., . 

Factory, 

New England Structural Co., 


1 
1 
1 
1 










1 


Lexington, » . 


- - 


— 


1 

[ 


Metropolitan Water Works 


™ 


Maiden, . 


4'6"X4'10"tol'0", . 


5.8442 


33 


blow-off, .... 
Private buildings, . 


1 
178 



1 Lexington, although admitted to the Metropolitan Sewerage System in 1897, has not contributed 
sewage to the Metropolitan trunk lines until the present year as no local sewerage system had been con- 
structed. Connection was made with the Metropolitan sewers September 11, 1916. 

1 Includes 1.84 miles of sewer purchased from the city of Maiden. 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



107 



North Metropolitan Sewerage System — Concluded. 

Location, Length and Sizes of Sewers, with Public and Special Connections 

— Concluded. 







0) 


0) g . 


Special Connections. 






1 


gs£ 




.s« 


Crrr or Town. 


Size of Sewers. 




d«1 

.1-4 


Character or Location of 


.2 








ublic 
tion 
ber 


Connection. 


•5 ® 
sO 






A 


Ah 




fc 








• 


Private buildings, . 


114 


Melrose, . 


4' 6"X4' 10" to 10", . 


6.0991 


38- 
> 


Railroad station, . 
Park Department bath house, 
Harvard dormitories, 
Slaughterhouse, . 




Cambridge, . 


5' 2"X5' 9" to V 3", . 


7.209 


44- 

> 


City Hospital, 

Street railway machine shop, 

Private buildings, . 

Tannery, .... 

Slaughterhouses (3), 

Car-house, 

Somerville Water Works blow- 




Somerville, 


6' 5"X7' 2" to 10", . 


3.577 


11 


off, 

Street railway power-house, . 

Stable 

Rendering works, . 






















Railroad scale pit, . 












Armory building, . 




Medford, 


4' 8"X5' 1" to 10", . 


5.713 


24' 

> 


Private buildings, . 

Police substation, . 
Tannery, .... 
Private buildings, . 
Gelatine factory, . . . 




Winchester, . 


4' 6" to 1' 3", 


9.470 


22. 


Watch-hand factory, .* 

Railroad station, . 

Felt works, 

Town Hall,' .... 




Stoneham, 


1' 3" to 10",. 


0.010 


4 


_ _ 




Woburn, 


l'10"X2'4"tol'3". . 


0.933 


3 

[ 


Glue factory, .... 
Private buildings, . 


152 


Arlington, 


1' 6" to 10" 


3 5202 


• 


Railroad station, . 
Car-house, .... 
Post office, .... 




Belmont, * 


_ _ 


- 


3 


- - 


- 


Wakefield, « . 


- - • 


- 


1 


- - 


- 


Revere, . 


4' 0" to 15", . .-..". 


0.136 


3 




- 




63.902* 


305 


528 



1 Includes .736 of a mile of sewer purchased from the city of Melrose. 

2 Includes 2.631 miles of sewer purchased from the town of Arlington. 

8 The Metropolitan sewer extends but a few feet into the towns of Belmont and Wakefield. 
* Includes 2.787 miles of Mystic Valley sewer in Medford, Winchester and Woburn, running parallel with 
the Metropolitan sewer. 



10S 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



South Metropolitan Sewerage System. 
Location, Length and Sizes of Sewers, with Public and Special Connections. 







CO 


li • 


Special Connections. 






1 


- o 2 

5 »S 




.5 a 


City or Town. 


Size of Sewers. 


a 


! CC 

s, D 
31, 1 


Character or Location of 


a> eg 


• 




bfl 

a 


ubli( 
tion 
ber 


Connection. 


aO 






h5 


Ph 




5 








' 


Tufts Medical School, . 


1 


Boston: — 
Back Bay, . 








Private house, 


l 


6' 6" to 3' 9", . ■ . 


1.500 1 


16' 


Administration Building, 
Boston Park Department, . 


1 










Simmons College buildings, . 


1 










Art Museum 


2 


Brighton, . 


5'9"X6'0"tol2", 


6.0102 


15 


Abattoir, .... 
Chocolate works, 
Machine shop, 


3 
2 
1 


Dorchester, . 


3'X4'to2'6"X2'7", . 


2.8703 


13 < 


Paper mill 

Private buildings, . 
Edison Electric Company Sta- 
tion, 

Mattapan Paper Mills, . 


1 
3 

1 
1 


Hyde Park, 


10' 7"X11' 7" to 4' 0"X4' 1", 


4.527 


18 ■ 


Private buildings, . 
Fairview Cemetery buildings, 


2 
1 


Roxbury, . 


6' 6"X7' to 4' 0", . 


1.430 


"f 


Parental School, 


1 


West Roxbury, . 


9'3"X10'2"tol2", . 


7.600 


* 


Lutheran Evangelical Church , 
Private buildings, . 


1 
4 


Brookline, 


6'6"X7'0"to8", 


2.540* 


12 


Private building, . 


2 


Dedham, 


4'X4'l"to3'0"X3'4", 


2.368 


7 


- - 


- 


Hull, 5 • 


60" pipe, . 


750 


- 


- - 


- 


Milton, . 


ll'X12'to8", 


3.600 


23 


Private buildings, . 


2 


Newton, 


4'2"X4'9"tol'3", . 


2.911 


7 


Private houses, 


6 


Quincy, . 


11' 3"X12' 6" to 24" pipe, . 


6.845 


14 


Metropolitan Water Works 
blow-off 


1 


Waltham, 


3'6"X4'0" 


001 


1 

[ 


Factories, .... 


2 


Watertown, . 


4' 2"X4' 9" to 12", 


0.750 6 


'} 


Stanley Motor Carriage Co., . 
Knights of Pythias building, 


1 
1 


Needham, 5 


2'0"X2'3"to2'3"X2'6", . 


3.880 




- — 


— 


Wellesley, 7 




- 


- 




- 




47.582 


147 


42 



1 Includes .355 of a mile of sewer purchased from the city of Boston. 

2 Includes .446 of a mile of pipe and concrete sewers built for the use of the city of Boston; also .026 
of a mile of sewer purchased from the town of Watertown. 

3 Includes 1.24 miles of sewer purchased from the city of Boston. 

4 Includes .158 of a mile of pipe sewer built for the use of the town of Brookline. 
8 Hull and Needham are not parts of the Metropolitan Sewerage District. 

6 Includes .025 of a mile of sewer purchased from the town of Watertown. 

7 The Metropolitan sewer extends but a few feet into the town of Wellesley. 



Information relating to areas, populations, local sewer connections 
and other data for the Metropolitan Sewerage districts appears in 
the following table : — 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



109 



North Metropolitan Sewerage District. 



Area 
(Square 


Estimated 

Total 
Population. 


Miles of 
Local Sewer 
connected. 


Estimated 

Population 

contributing 

Sewage. 


Ratio of 

Contributing 

Population 

to Total 
Population 
(Per Cent.). 


Connections made 
with Metro- 
politan Sewers. 


Miles). 


Public. 


Special. 


100.32 


620,070 


761.76 


557,160 


89.9 


305 


528 



South Metropolitan Sewerage District. 



110.76 



455,630 



641.31 



317,005 



69.6 



147 



42 



Both Metropolitan Sewerage Districts. 



211.08 



1,075,700 



1,403.07 



874,165 



81.3 



452 



570 



Of the estimated gross population of 1,075,700 on December 31, 
1916, 874,165, representing 81.3 per cent., were on that date con- 
tributing sewage to the Metropolitan sewers, through a total length 
of 1,403.07 miles of local sewers owned by the individual cities and 
towns of the districts. 

These sewers are connected with the Metropolitan systems by 452 
public and 570 special connections. During the current year there 
has been an increase of 32.11 miles of local sewers connected with the 
Metropolitan systems, and 13 public and 12 special connections have 
been added. 

CONSTRUCTION. 
NORTH METROPOLITAN SEWERAGE SYSTEM. 

Deer Island Outfall Extension. 

Section 1A, the temporary 60-inch cast-iron outfall to be used in 
connection with the outfall extension, has been completed. The 
particulars of this contract were given in last year's report. This 
work was finished and the sewage turned through it on October 16, 
1916. No particular difficulties were encountered in the work 
excepting delays from stormy weather. 



110 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 



Section 1. — Deer Island Outfall Extension. 
A contract for laying the 84-inch cast-iron pipe and specials for 
the extension of the outfall sewer near Deer Island Light was made 
early in the year. Some particulars of this section and contract are 
as follows: 

Date of contract No. 135, April 22, 1916. 

Length of section, 322 feet. 

Name of contractor, Roy H. Beattie, Incorporated. 

Depth of work below mean high water, 70 feet. 

Diameter of cast-iron pipe, 84 inches to 48 inches. 

Assistant Engineer in charge of construction, Clarence A. Moore. 

This work consists of dredging a channel and placing the pipe in 
the same and backfilling. Part of the pipe rests on a stone founda- 
tion pier which extends from Station 2+58 to Station 3+22. This 
portion will be protected by stone riprap. The remainder of the 
pipe will be placed on sills supported by piles or blocking. Work 
was begun on July 9, 1916, and dredging was practically completed 
August 25, 1916. Considerable time was lost in this work because 
of the stormy weather which rendered it impossible to work in this 
exposed location. 

The work of placing the stone foundation was begun September 
23, 1916, and has been completed. Operations were begun at the 
southerly end and the cast-iron pipe has been laid toward the exist- 
ing outfall between Stations 3+18 and 2+10. The riprap reinforce- 
ment has been completed over this section. Owing to the swift 
current at this place work could be carried on only at the slack 
periods at the turn of the tide. Work was suspended for the season 
on December 13, 1916, because of weather conditions. It is expected 
that the contract will be completed early in the coming year. No 
unexpected difficulties have been encountered. 

Section 19. — Malden River Siphon. 
The work on this section and the contract* are described in last 
year's report. The work was completed without difficulty and the 
siphon was put in operation May 9, 1916. 



.No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. Ill 



Removal of Old Malden River Siphon. 

In accordance with the Acts of Congress, Chapter 253 of 1912 
and Chapter 142 of 1915 which carried appropriations for improve- 
ments in Maiden River, it was necessary that the Commonwealth 
should remove the old Maiden River sewerage siphon. This was 
provided for in Chapter 215 of the General Acts of the Legislature 
of the year 1915. A contract for this work was made, some par- 
ticulars of which are as follows: 

Date of contract No. 137, June 30, 1916. 

Name of contractor, Boston Dredging Company. 

Depth of work below mean high water, 35 feet. 

Assistant Engineer in charge of construction, Clarence A. Moore. 

Work was started under this contract July 29, 1916, and was 
completed September 22, 1916. It was found impracticable to pull 
the piles in the deep sections and they were cut off at an elevation 
of 25 feet below mean low water and the portion remaining below 
this elevation was left in place. 

In connection with this work a cast-iron sluice gate has been 
placed at the Wellington end of the old siphon. It is the intention 
to use this westerly portion of the old siphon extending from the 
Wellington side head house to the proposed channel as an overflow 
and emergency outlet. The duties imposed upon the Commonwealth 
by the terms of the Acts of Congress have been completed and as 
far as our work is concerned the channel improvements at Maiden 
River can be made. 

Extension to Reading. 
Chapter 159 of the General Acts of 1916 provided for the admis- 
sion of the town of Reading into the North Metropolitan Sewerage 
District and also for the construction through Wakefield, Reading and 
Stoneham of a trunk sewer connecting Reading with the existing North 
Metropolitan trunk sewer in Woburn. This Act was accepted by the 
town of Reading on May 22, 1916. Studies and surveys have been made 
and a part of the line has been located extending from the town line 
of Reading at a point in Brook Street, southerly in Wakefield through 
lands of Lucia Beebe and Edward F. Gilman, then across Summer Ave- 
nue and then in Reading through land of George A. Forbes, then in 



112 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

Wakefield still through land of George A. Forbes and land of Herbert 
M. Hopkins, across Hopkins Street then through lands of Herbert M. 
Hopkins and Joseph E. Hopkins, across North Street, and then in 
Stoneham through lands of Bear Hill Associates, Inc., lands of 
Everel K. Farr, Walter Steele and Nathaniel F. Fletcher, across 
Main Street and through lands of J. Arthur Wessel, Richard C. 
Christie, Ellen Magner, Annie E. Greene, Margaret McLaughlin and 
Elizabeth L. McGrady to a point in land of Mary A. Scally. This 
portion of the work, about 7,500 feet, will be constructed in rock 
tunnel, excepting 1,370 feet near the Reading town line, and will 
consist of a concrete sewer 24" x 27" in trench and a concrete sewer 
in tunnel 36 inches in diameter. This part of the line will be known 
as Sections 76 and 75. 

A contract and specifications were prepared for Section 76 and 
bids were asked for, the opening date being November 27, 1916. 
No bids were received. Plans and specifications for Section 75 are 
now being made. 

SOUTH METROPOLITAN SEWERAGE SYSTEM. 

Wellesley Extension. 

During the year surveys have been completed over the remaining 
part of the line and Sections 98, 99 and 102 have been advertised for 
construction. 

Section 98. — Wellesley Extension. 

This section begins at Station 22+25 of Section 26 of the 
Neponset Valley sewer in West Roxbury and extends southwesterly 
through land of Mary A. Read, crossing Charles River into Ded- 
ham and extending through land of Hannah Bingham and land of 
Catherine H. Rooney, other land of Hannah Bingham and then 
crosses Bridge Street and passes along Bullard Road, turning into 
Hillcrest Avenue and extending into Violet Avenue, a total distance 
of 3,350 feet. 

A contract was made for the construction of this section, some 
particulars of which are as follows: 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 113 

Date of contract No. 138, July 13, 1916. 

Name of contractor, Thomas Russo & Company. 

Length of section, 3,350 feet. 

Average depth of cut, 15 feet. 

Dimensions of concrete sewers, 36 inches by 40 inches, and 34 inches by 37 

inches. 
Assistant Engineer in charge of construction, Arthur F. F. Haskell. 

Work was started under this contract July 31, 1916, at Station 
19+89. The Contractor encountered considerable difficulty because 
of fine sand and finally abandoned the contract, having constructed 
but 30 feet of concrete invert, 

The Metropolitan Water and Sewerage Board entered into a 
contract with George M. Bryne, dated October 23, 1916, for the 
completion of this section. Work was started under the latter con- 
tract November 5, 1916, and at the date of this report there have 
been constructed 93 feet of sewer and the trench has been partially 
excavated for a distance of 137 feet. Progress on this section has 
been slow owing to the nature of the ground. Much valuable time 
has been lost as the section for about 1,700 feet extends across the 
marsh through w r hich the Charles River runs. At certain periods of 
the year the river overflows this marsh and work on this portion can 
be done only in the dry seasbn. It w^as the intention to have this 
part of the work completed during the autumn months. 



Section 99. — Wellesley Extension. 

This section extends from a point in Violet Avenue, westerly along 
said avenue and enters land of Edward and Catherine Bingham, 
then crosses Pine Street and extends along Jenney Lane, then passes 
through land of Lawrence Minot, et at., Trustees, and crosses the 
Charles River to a point in land of Stephen M. Weld. Contract 
No. 139 for this section was advertised and bids were received on 
June 30, 1916. All bids were rejected and no contract for the con- 
struction of this section has been made. 

Sections 100 and 101. — Wellesley Extension. 

Survey work has been completed for Sections 100 and 101 and 
maps are being made. 



\ 



114 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 



Section 102. — Wellesley Extension. 

This section starts from a point in Needham in the land of Mrs. 
Mary J. Sidney and extends northerly through said land and land 
of John T. Morse, Jr., then through land of Charles P. Beebe, then 
through land of Richard G. Wadsworth, land of Hannah E. Pond 
and land of J. Austin Amory to a point in Chestnut Street. Bids 
for the construction of this section were opened on September 27, 
1916, and a contract was made, some particulars of which are as 
follows : 

Date of contract No. 143, October 2, 1916. 

Name of contractor, Bruno & Petitti. 

Length of section, 6,851 feet. 

Average depth of cut, 9 feet. 

Dimensions of concrete sewer, 27 inches by 30 inches. 

Assistant Engineer in charge of construction, Arthur F. F. Haskell. 

Work on this section was begun at two places, one on October 7, 
1916, at Station and the other on November 5, 1916, near Station 
50+42. From Station to Station 3+12 and from Station 5+10 
to Station 8+00 it was found necessary to excavate below grade 
because of the presence of peat. This was refilled to grade with 
special concrete. About 1,250 feet have been constructed in the 
opening near Station and 240 feet in the opening near Station 
50+42. A very small amount of ground water has been encountered. 
Ledge was found at various points between Station 9+50 and 
Station 13+48. > 



Section 103. — Wellesley Extension. 

The particulars of this section and contract were described in last 
year's report. Openings were started on this section near Station 
and near Station 36+40 early in April. No particular difficulty has 
been encountered in the work. From Station 6+15 to Station 
12+15 it was necessary to introduce a pile foundation. Work was 
completed on this section early in December. 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 115 



Section 104. — Wellesley Extension. 

The particulars of this contract were described in last year's report. 
Work was started on the section in tunnel near Station 17+72. No 
special difficulties have been encountered in the work. At the date 
of this report the work in tunnel has been completed excepting 
manhole at Station 27+20. The work in open cut has been com- 
pleted excepting a manhole at Station 3+28. A considerable amount 
of rock was encountered in all parts of the work. The sewer from 
Station 30+30 to the end of the section was constructed almost 
wholly in rock trench. 

The contractors on these sections have experienced considerable 
difficulty in obtaining labor owing to the general scarcity of the 
same and the remoteness of this location. 

It has not been possible to let contracts for Sections 99, 100 and 
101 during this year because of the insufficiency of the appropriation 
for the construction of this work. The amount appropriated by 
Act 343 of the year 1914 was $350,000. This estimate was made by 
the State Board of Health in 1913. The European war which started 
after this appropriation was made has so increased the cost of labor 
and materials that the original appropriation probably will complete 
about one half the line. 

MAINTENANCE. 

Scope of Work and Force Employed. 

The maintenance of the Metropolitan Sewerage System includes 
the operation of 7 pumping stations, the Nut Island screen-house 
and 111.484 miles of Metropolitan sewers, receiving the discharge 
from 1,403.07 miles of town and city sewers at 452 points, together 
with the care and study of inverted siphons under streams and in 
the harbor. 

The permanent maintenance force includes 163 men, of whom 100 
are employed on the North System and 63 on the South System. 
These are subdivided as follows: North Metropolitan System, 58 
engineers and other employees at the pumping stations; on main- 
tenance, care of sewer lines, buildings and grounds, 42 men, includ- 
ing foremen; South Metropolitan System, 35 engineers and other 



116 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

employees within the pumping stations; and 28 men, including 
foremen, on maintenance, care of sewer lines, buildings and grounds. 

The regular work of this department, in addition to the operation 
of the pumping stations, has consisted of the routine work of cleaning 
and inspecting sewers and siphons, caring for tide gates, regulators 
and overflows, measuring flow in sewers, inspection of connections to 
the Metropolitan sewers, care of pumping stations and other build- 
ings and grounds, and the maintenance of the ferry at Shirley Gut 
for transporting employees and supplies in connection with the oper- 
ation of the Deer Island pumping station. 

In addition to these regular duties other work has been done by 
this department as follows: 

Deer Island Pumping Station. 

During the year, at this station, the interior of the engine room 
and boiler room has been cleaned and newly painted. A new work 
scow of 20 tons capacity for transporting materials and other harbor 
use has been constructed. 

All work was done by maintenance employees. 

East Boston Pumping Station. 

A one-story masonry building 13 feet by 30 feet with a concrete 
roof has been constructed in the stock yard on Addison Street to be 
used as a stock and pattern building. 

All work was done by maintenance employees. ( 

Ward Street Pumping Station. 

At this station are four 175 horse power upright boilers of the Dean 
type, which were put in operation in 1904. During the last two 
years much trouble has been caused by the breaking of stay bolts and 
this condition had become so serious that it was finally decided to 
re-stay completely all of these boilers. The labor for this work was 
done by contract with the Atlantic Works of Boston. The stay 
bolts were furnished by the Metropolitan Water and Sewerage 
Board and consisted of Burden iron. These boilers are now in good 
condition. 

The pumping plant at this station has been in service since 1904 
and is in good condition. It furnishes a complete duplication of 
units for ordinary flows. In time of storm, however, it is necessary 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 117 

to run both of the pumping engines. So far, all the necessary re- 
pairs on the plant have been accomplished in such a manner as to 
leave always the two engines ready for use at short notice. It is 
probable, however, that at some time more extensive repairs will 
have to be made and that it will be necessary to have one pump tem- 
porarily out of service. This would leave a deficiency in the pump- 
ing plant in time of storm. To guard against such a condition, 
Chapter 93 of the General Acts of 1916 provided that additional 
boilers and pumping plant should be installed at this station. A 
contract for the installation of the boilers was entered into, some 
particulars of which are as follows: 

Date of contract No. 136. May 20, 1916. 

Name of contractor, D. M. Dillon Steam Boiler Works. 

Articles contracted for, two 175 horse power vertical boilers. 

The boilers are nearly completed and will be delivered early in the 
coming year. 

Contract and specifications were prepared for a 50,000,000 gallon 
steam-turbine driven pumping unit and bids were solicited. These 
were opened on October 11, 1916. All bids, being in excess of the 
amount appropriated, were rejected. 

Nut Island Screen-house. 

The dwelling house owned by the Commonwealth and occupied 
by the Engineer in charge at the Nut Island screen-house has 
received extensive repairs. These consist of masonry foundation, 
shingling the vertical walls of the house and the construction of a 
new piazza. 

All work was done by maintenance employees. 

Gasoline in Public Sewers. 

The effort to improve the condition of the Metropolitan sewers in 
regard to dangers from gasoline explosion has been successful. An 
inspector has been employed in this department whose duties are to 
visit existing garages and see that the separators are kept in proper 
condition, also to enforce the regulation concerning the installation 
of such separators at all newly constructed garages. While the 
presence of gasoline in the sewers is noted occasionally, the condition 
has been greatly improved. 



118 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



Table showing Number of Places connected with Public Sewers where 
Gasoline is used and Progress of Work of installing Separators 
to January 1, 1917. 

North Metropolitan Sewerage District. 



City or Town. 


■ 

a 
o 

© ss 
© ©. 

4S 

o £ 

.§1 

p a 


Number of Places origi- 
nally having Accepta- 
ble Separators. 


Number of Places where 
Changes have been 
made. 


© 
feO 

a 

a 
O 

© 

© * 


Number of Places where 
Changes have yet to 
be made. 


Remarks. 


Arlington, .... 


3 


- 


3 


1 


- 




Belmont, .... 


3 


- 


1 


1 


1 




Boston: — 














Charlestown District, 


11 


- 


7 


4 


- 




East Boston District, 


7 


- 


7 


- 


- 




Cambridge, 








50 


- 


40 


9 


1 




Chelsea, 








9 


- 


9 


- 


- 




Everett, 








13 


- 


12 


1 


- 




Lexington, 
Maiden, 








19 


■* 


18 


1 


_ 


Town sewerage system put in 
operation this year. 


Medford, 








10 


- 


10 


- 


- 




Melrose, 








5 


- 


4 


1 


- 




Revere, 








6 


- 


5 


1 


- 




Somerville, 








31 


8 


26 


4 


1 




Stoneham, 








3 


- 


2 


1 


- 




Wakefield, 








4 


- 


4 


- 


- 




Winchester, 








12 


- 


6 


6 


- 




Winthrop, 








4 


- 


3 


1 


- 




Woburn, 








2 


- 


2 


- 


- 




Reading, 








- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


Not yet connected with Met- 
ropolitan sewers. 


Totals, . 


192 


8 


159 


31 


3 





No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



119 



Table showing Number of Places connected with Public Sewers where 
Gasoline is used and Progress op Work of installing Separators 
to January 1, 1917. 

South Metropolitan Sewerage District. 





i 


i l 


© fl 


w 


© o 






a 

o 

© t-< 


'C ft 


|8 

rM (1 


© 
bfl 


St +3 
© 






w g 


o © 

_ « 


£^ 


u 
03 


*8> 




City ob Town. 


© £ 
o a) 

O £ 


of Places 
aving Ac 
arators. 


<D © 


O 

^ . 
^ to 


of Places 
ss have ; 
e. 


Remarks. 




© fl) 




. © 

-5 03^3 




©^ 






& © 


a^i> 


s^g 


33 


a^ © 






3 fl 


3 flX! 


so a 


S-Q 


SO.fi 






fc 


£ 


a 


& 


£ 




Boston: — 














Hyde Park District, 


8 


- 


4 


1 


3 


Not yet fully reported upon. 


West Roxbury District, 














Back Bay District, . 
















. • 


51 


5 


26 


10 


10 


Not yet fully reported upon. 


Brighton District, 
















Dorchester District, 
















Brookline, . 




55 


9 


36 


10 


- 




Dedham, 




2 


2 


- 


- 


- 




Milton, 




- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


No garages connected with the 
public sewers. 


Newton, 




31 


18 


5 


8 


- 




Quincy, 




12 


- 


9 


2 


1 




Waltham, 




3 


3 


- 


3 


- 


In most cases garages are con- 
nected with the surface 
drains. 


Watertown, . 




13 


3 


8 


2 


- 


* 


Wellesley, 




- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


No connection as yet with Met- 
ropolitan sewers. 


Totals, . 


175 


40 


88 


36 


14 





Drainage from Tanneries, Gelatine and Glue Works in 
Winchester, Wobtjrn and Stoneham. 

Four men and a foreman have been employed during a part of the 
year in flushing and cleaning the Metropolitan sewers through the 
tannery districts of Winchester, Woburn and Stoneham. 

All the tanneries and glue works of the district now have settling 
tanks of substantial size. This method of treatment has very greatly 
reduced the amount of sludge material entering the Metropolitan 
sewers. 



120 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



The following table gives details of settling tanks introduced to 
date, showing the operations of same with the amount of sludge 
collected and removed : — 

Table of Semi-fluid Sludge removed from Settling Basins at the Tanneries, Gela- 
tine and Glue Works in Winchester, Woburn and Stoneham, Year ending 
December 31, 1916. 



Location of Basin. 



Basin put in 
Operation. 



Inside 
Measure- 
ment 
of Basin 
(Feet). 



'p 




9 




a 




$ 




<x> 








o 






t- 


e 


& 


s 




H 


01 


te* 


-O 


o-*> 


Eh 


U) 


0> 


a 


Xi 




s 


3 




TJ 


£ 





' T3 o 

§ o ^ 



ass* 



9 



3^3 






T3 W)^. 

III 

H 



Beggs & Cobb Company, Basin No. 1, 
Beggs & Cobb Company, Basin No. 2, 
Beggs & Cobb Company, Basin No. 3, 
S. C. Parker & Son, . 



American Hide and Leather Company, 

Factory D. 
B. F. Kimball & Co., . 



E. Cummings Leather Company, 
W. P. Fox & Sons, 
Thayer & Foss, .... 
Morris Kaplan, 1 . 

Van Tassell Leather Company, . 

American Glue Company, . 

J. O. Whitten Company, 

Total, ..... 



Jan. 15, 1910 

May 9, 1910 

Oct. 19, 1911 

Aug. 1, 1910 

Nov. 15, 1910 

Dec. 10, 1910 

Nov. 1, 1910 

July 12, 1910 
Sept. 15, 1910 

Jan. 9, 1911 

May 1, 1911 

Oct. 1, 1910 

1902 



47.0 X 23.0 
47.0 X 23.0 
51.0 X 25.0 
48.3 X 23.0 

48.0 X 23.1 
47.2 X 23.0 
45.9 X 22.6 
47.8 X 22.6 

48.1 X 23.1 
46.8 X 22.9 

10.2 X 14.5 
43.8 X 19.5 

47.1 X 23.0 

35.5 X 24.7 

67.2 X 12.0 



6 

5^ 

6 
i 

5 
5 

n 

7 
4 1 

2 
3 

lj 
17 



136.00 
136.00 
162.50 

69.88 
139.54 
106.84 

97.60 
135.20 
104.86 

3.00 
102.00 

136.36 

58.74 



816.00 
748,00 
975.00 
34.94 
697.50 
534.20 
146.40 
946.40 
471.87 



6.00 
306.00 

204.54 

998.60 
51.00 



6,308.70 



1 Successors to Bay State Leather Company. 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



121 



ft 

CO 

O 
<! 

« 

CQ 

o 

Ph 

o 



O 



co ■*§ 

© s° 

-KS CO 

-»-» © 



60 



CO 
no 

CO 

o 
CO 

60 

CO 
CO 



60 

CO 

co 



60 

© 
•<s> 

i— o 

©< 

© 



^ 



© 

60 

© 

•<s> 

-*o 



© 

NO 
CO 



© ~ 



Oh 



CO 



•<s> 

© 
©, 



60 
CO 



CO 

©5 

e 

CO 

5Q 



co ^ 53 

»© _r 



CO © 

"3 s 

fC 60 

© <3 

^° © 

CO S-. 



sS 6o 
.?: © 
•<s> *<s> 



Q 



•<s> 

s- 
co 

s> 

•<o 
r*o 

CO 

CO 

© 



6 



© 

CO 



co S 

^3 -. 

co 

©• co 



s 



0^ Ph 



©5 S 

•§•1 

f © o 

*«■ © 

-*-s -to 

§ §■ 

so © 

CO 

£ ©> 
§ • J 

co 3 

"^ is 



«*"3 



S © 



TO 



© 

-2 t; 1« 



bfl 
° 2 "3 ©-^ 









PL| 



© 03 oS os 

^.s a © 

3 © 



1 ig 5 © 

§< %a © 



© +» i 

o3 aj o3 -j rt 

W 



Slit* 




03 © H 






« 3P-i ft © fl 



© d fl S 02 

So-* 3 I 



o 

U 



43 o | fl * 
^3lJ ? O a 
s" aj o 5 



O 



icooou3'*'t^t^sfti>>^H'-iooifteo 



55 ONWOi ~ 

© I I 

O t^ eo o eft — < o> (N csi t^ i>. Tt< t^ evi t^ oo i>- Tt< th 
^ oo «s »o io «o -* "5 oo oo co cs t-teocsi co 



Ph 



aj 

^^ O <32 05 Oi OO OO 00 OS OS C5 Ol ©2 ""* »« OO 00 CO 00 

tl'-l 



i-j HOOTjtrHNMNiHtOlClOHOOfCOHfflN 

B ©<HINC0OI>NrH0S!<5OSN>15(NtOCOrH0000 



HMNe0OC0H(OM00"5iNi0i0TltNi0>00> 






ITfONffiCOtONO 



hhhhMhCOMMHHOHhOON 



O 1 
CO 



koomooooooooooooooooo 

NlOMtDC0cDrHONNHO)01CC00>0'*(Xl«H0 

eoNinoTd'No"o"o"(No"cD'Nifl''oo"eO'*N'N 



»0O O O O iO»rt O O O 0«5 »0 0>0>OOi'SO I 

NCOONOO©MNtON»CON^OMtONIO 

OiWCQOOOO^IOONOcDOONO'^OtOlMHCO 



moooooioooooooooooo 



I rj( lO 00 W Ol N rt O ■* ■* (N O «5 ■* ■* O rH (M | 
t~iCI>.lOOOCS>i-H^COOt^CS|CS10t^l^'*CO 
Oi O *-H_0 00 CNJ_rfi<ffl 00 O5_00 O^Oi CS) i-H_l>- -^ 

e-Tco^io «o co»n'co>o»o"'-H i-T esf^-T eo 



F OT3T! 


T3T3T3 


<U (XI © 


a> <u © 


« el c 


fl (3 13 






jDXi-r! • 


•^2X2 X! 


ass 


SSS 


o o o 


o o o 


o o « . 


.wow 


r OT5'T3 


TlT)73 


ei c fl 


a a (3 


o3 o3 o3 


c3 Cj Cj 



O>0i©©©©©©©©©©©©©©© 

+J+)HJ^P+J-P'P-P'P-P+J-P+JW-P 

O3o3o3o3o3o3o3o3o3o3o3c3o3o3o3o3o3 
O3o3o3o3o3o3o3o3o3o3o3o3o3o3o3o3o3 ■ 

CJ©©©©©©©©©©©©©©©© 
C0C0C0C0C0C0C0C0COC0COCOCOCOCOC0C0 




bfi 

PI 

03 
^3 



£3 






o 




T3 














o 






© 




(1J 


a 




PI 


a 




d 


o 




n 




C-l 


u 




OJ 


+j 




lO 


o 




o 


PI 

bn 


73 


Pi 


03 
© 


T^ 




» 


c 






& 






o 






+J 






fcH 






o 






>. 






+J 






u 




pi 



CO lf5 

S 3 



«h S H 
0) 3 3 

^2 2 • rt 



© PI 



03 



PI „ 

o3 a 



(V 03 
DO 

a s 

62 



TJ H3 



_© 

© 4) 

^ PI 

■** a 

"S 5 

3 § 

W S3 

W S 

0) >> 



w 



03 


rt 


i-s 


> 




O 


a 


'+3 


-> 


m 


rr 


>> 


>> 


% 


43 


<-*-. 




O 




> 



rj on 



122 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



o 

« 

GO 

IS 

o 
p* 
o 
« 



5b 

o 



eo ho 

SS ^ 

© ?> 

•<o CO 

^ co 

^ -8 

co "S 

to © 

1 ^ 

■«* . 

°&s co 

feq §. 

4? ^ ' 
co 

■8-6 

8 « 

2 ° 

co c? 



5S 
© 



CO 



3 

© 



ho 

co 

eo 
co 
J- 



f«5 



e 
co 

CO 

CO CO 

♦O JL 

§4 



sT ed 



3 



*eO 

© 


8 


© 

CO 


a 




© 

CO* 


3 

© 


a 

CO 

Q 


^ 


i 


CO 


o 




•fO 


© 

*<o 
ho 


co 
o3 


co 


HO 


T3 

CO 




© 


i»o 


a 


CO 


© 
© 

HO 


© 


1 

go 

CO 


HO 


CO 


^ 


d 
.2 



HO g 



CO 



CO 

e 

CO 

i *© 

<» HO 

■5 ? 



CO o3 

■^ a 
"©* 
to 

s 

CO 

v. 



©• c, 
co 



„ © 



© 

HO 

CO 
© 
CO 



8« 

•I £ 

co § 

CO ©" 



§^ 



•<S> 

HO 



5 



^3 « 



J2 u 2 e8 



■3.9 fl^.g 



tf go o .o 






^.§ 



i^ 1 



o5s 

d ® 
d S 



T3 



J2 d C Q> 

3 §S M 



-o 

rt © rt d 2 
aSoa.9 

mPn 1 - pL, 



•llgll 



T3 "S 
0) 



2^ ^ o 
d"" o«a 



•I as | j s 






73 
so 
| 

s 

o 
O 

u 

o 

Q 



03 



«12 



•d9feg" 



o 
H 

Q 

s 

•< 

m 

u 

H 

o 



d ■* eo co «o ■<*< os i-i eo to ri o-^» . 
CJ I • • I 

w t* co «o -^ m ^h »o eo cocn 



Pm 



dotoooc»eo«oeou3co-H e»»-« 

rj o> o co ^ oi -«j< o i-H c» o cnJc55 

v **' o t>. OS OJ co OS eo to co ■** t>-«o 

Pm 



i50t^COCOOCOCO»CllOTl<CMC35lOCO 



»HeOCO«0"«JieOit*CNl-^05»-(COiMCi 



CQ 



r2 U5 OS 00 OS CO tJ< O C*l 00 CO 00 <-< 
•SZ i-i »-H »o eo <M ■* iO OS id oo eoeo 



in « n Tt< o o> io oo eoeo 
1 ^h co eo t>^ c<i cni 6nj o i-i eo tNieo 



CO 



oooooooooooooo 

eC^OOOOlONlOMWOOONiO 

oeoeoeoioooa©^oiMW5» 



•^OOOOOOiCOO I OO I 
lONNtONtDOOOH i*< o 
eo CM OO O r*< eo eo eo O eo O »* 



OS t- t~ it} lO t^ 00 kO t~ U3 NIQ 



osioaoMiCHrtoo i -^<co I 
^h o> i-H »^ eo eo oo cn> to eo »o^i 
oo oo oo eo »^oo oo eft eo co o 5 ,"' 

i-Teo'^'t>^cNeo«o ci" eo»o 



OHO 

d d d 

ass 

o o o 

o o o 
"O'O'O 

d d d 

c3 cj Cj 



-OT3 
CJ <D 

d d 
•IS ',3 

aa 

o o 

. o o 

H3T3 

d d 



i d 

IS 

a 



0)0)008)0)1)00© 
o3o3o3o3o3c$o3o3o3o3 
c3c3rtOjCjo3ricjrioj 
o©ojc)a)ci)cufl)Q)a) 







e3 03 
AG. 
0) © 
CQ&Q 



tf)CSNTHrtONO-iO COCO 

eo ^ o eo eo eo eo eo 00 CO eoeo 

eONMifl'J'NeOOMN os t-n 

CM eo t>. CM Tti t*( in i-i eo i-t iflS 



3 



cj g 
P35 

M 

03" 



CJ.S 



CQW © 



o 



03 

.Ph 

T3 



gcS 



CJ fc »M HM .Hl^ 



O S ®^ « O-- O® o O 34? 



d 
.9 

03 

3 
o. 
o 
a 
o 
^3 

d 

03 



9 






d 
.9 




a 






a 











d 




a 






a 













a 




+j 






TJ 




(H 






CO 




O 






b8 




>> 






a 














O 






-t-- 




-d 






CO 











d 




0) 






03 




d 






u 










d 




n^ 







> 




d 


u 


a 









m 


s 






pd 

O 


P 

CD 


>> 
CO 


a 

"1 


CO 

i 

CO 


u 

<]1 




CO 


^ 


a 


s 


bli 
d 


.2 


00 

d 


d 
d 


CO 


03 


CO 


-*-> 


o> 


d 


Q 


< 





J3 


ifl 




4a 


u< 


+a 


*s 


d 


03 


g 






















O 

d 




a 

(-. 


d 



d 
.9 
+3 

d 


CO 

a 




CO 


-u 


+j 


s 


s 


no 


'5 


5 


d 


pq 


d 


Tl 


CD 

"go 
C 

8 

1 


13 

CO 

T3 

"3 




-d 
d 


CO 

-t-> 


d 
a 



CO 


q 




Q 


6 


i 

a 


■^ 



R 




CO 

d 
d 




CO 

d 


CO 










d 


-(J 


vt-< 


E 


CO 


8 



d 


Estimated 
Part of to 1 
At preseni 


M 

d 

d 
1— 1 


>> 

-CO 

In 

_co 

■ffl 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



123 









02 

H 

S 
O 
< 

3 

M 

o 

Pi 
o 

B 



W 
O 



?ja£ lei 


©»H 


1— 1 


lO 


Ratic 

Contri 

ing A 

to 

Ultim 

Are 


© 

Ph 


OS 
CM 


© 

eo , 


eJO 








& fl*> S 


. 






Ratio of 

Contributi 

Populatio 

to Presen 

Total 
Populatio 


© • 

^00 
© 


CO 

© 

CO 


eo 

00 


Ph 






Area 
ultimately 

to 

contribute 

Sewage. 


© 


CO 

© 

»— 1 


00 

© 




rt 


CM 


stimated 

Area 
low con- 
ributing 
Sewage. 


SO 


oo 


00 


•^cm' 


CM 

eo 


eo 
•«* 

CO 


D" 






H h*» 


03 






-a 








mate 

esent 

otal 

pula- 

ion. 


o 


o 
eo 


o 
o 


© 
© 


CO 


us 


<»Ph Ph 


CM 
CO 


»o 


©_ 


W 






»— 1 


1.1 a a.- 


© 


»» 


o 


Estimal 

Populat 

now co 

tributii 

Sewag 


co 


o 


CO 




© 




»o 

us 


eo 


00 








Istimated 
umber of 
Persons 
erved by 
ich House 
onnection. 


t^ 


CM 


© 


CO 


t>^ 


CO 


WZ «i^O 
















umber 
I Con- 
sctions 
,h Loca 
ewers. 


1— 1 

cm* 


© 
© 
eo 


o 

© 
CO 


00 


■* 


CM 


S 05*02 










„ 


„ 




•d 


T3 


•o 




© 


© 


© 




a 


a 


C 


1 










£ 


.O. 


,C 




a 


a 


S 




o 


o 


o 




o 


© 


o 






T3 


T3 




o 


a 


fl 




e3 


o3 




© 

% 

u 

eS 

a 
© 

02 


© 


© 

•4J 




C3 

C3 


03 
3 




a 


a 


1 


© 

03 


© 

02 




j, , 


CO 


,_, 


r^ 


Miles 
of Loca 
Sewere 

con- 
nected 


t- 


CO 


o 


CO 


■* 


eo 

o 


t~- 


co 


•^ 






»■* 




a 


C 




eg 


ei 




-u 


-u 


a 


S3 




H 
H 


a 


'o 
a 


Bn 


o 


o 


02 


© 


■8 J2 




3 


§ J 




,4 


5 S 




14 

o 


3 
O 
02 





124 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



PUMPING STATIONS. 
Capacity and Results. 

Owing to the heavy rainfall of the earlier part of 1916 the pump- 
ing at the stations of the Metropolitan Sewerage Works increased in 
amounts varying from 9.8 per cent, to 23.7 per cent, as compared 
with 1915. 

The increase in the price of coal affected only the latter half of the 
year 

A slight increase in engineers' wages was made in the Deer Island, 
East Boston and Charlestown pumping stations. 

The expense per million foot gallons pumped at the stations of the 
Sew r erage Works is substantially below that of last year. 



Average Daily Volume of Sewage lifted at Each of the Six Principal Metropolitan 
Pumping Stations and at the Quincy (Hough's Neck) Sewage Lifting Station 
during the Year, as compared with the Corresponding Volumes for the Previous 
Year. 





Average Daily Pumpage. 


PUMPING STATION. 


Jan. 1, 1915, to 
Dec. 31, 1915. 


Jan. 1, 1916, to 
Dec. 31, 1916. 


Increase during the 
Year. 


Deer Island, 


Gallons. 
60,392,000 


Gallons. 
66,300,000 


Gallons. 
5,908,000 


Per Cent. 
9.8 


East Boston, 


58,392,000 


64,300,000 


5,908,000 


10.1 


Charlestown, 


33,500,000 


37,300,000 


3,800,000 


11.3 


Alewife Brook, 


3,371,000 


3,847,000 


476,000 


14.1 


Quincy 


3,865,000 


4,780,000 


915,000 


23.7 


Ward Street (actual gallons pumped), 


26,933,000 


29,864,000 


2,931,000 


10.9 


Quincy (Hough's Neck) sewage lifting sta- 
tion. 


177,700 


187,238 


9,538 


5.4 



North Metropolitan System. 
Deer Island Pumping Station. 

At this station are four submerged centrifugal pumps with im- 
peller wheels 8.25 feet in diameter, driven by triple-expansion engines 
of the Reynolds-Corliss type. 

Contract capacity of 1 pump: 100,000,000 gallons, with 19-foot lift. 
Contract capacity of 3 pumps: 45,000,000 gallons each, with 19-foot lift. 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



125 



Average duty for the year: 59,400,000 foot-pounds. 

Average quantity raised each day: 66,300,000 gallons. 

Force employed : 4 engineers, 1 relief engineer, 4 firemen, 4 oilers, 3 screenmen, 

1 relief screenman and 1 laborer. 
Coal used: New River, costing from $4.21 to $5.92 per gross ton. 



Table of Approximate Quantities, Lifts and Duties at the Deer Island Pumping 
Station of the North Metropolitan System. 



Months. 


Total 
Pumpage 
(Gallons). 


Average 
per Day 
(Gallons). 


Minimum 

Day 
(Gallons). 


Maximum 

Day 
(Gallons). 


Average 

Lift 
(Feet). 


Average 

Duty (ft.-lbs. 

per 100 lbs. 

Coal). 


1916 

January, . 




2,090,100,000 


67,400,000 


51,800,000 


109,300,000 


11.36 


61,700,000 


February, 






2,087,300,000 


72,000,000 


51,100,000 


162,000,000 


11.63 


54,500,000 


March, 






2,579,800,000 


83,200,000 


63,500,000 


113,300,000 


11.86 


61,300,000 


April, 






2,533,200,000 


84,400,000 


70,800,000 


108,300,000 


12.21 


62,000,000 


May, 






2,333,700,000 


75,300,000 


56,500,000 


123,700,000 


11.21 


62,000,000 


June, 






2,236,200,000 


74,500,000 


62,200,000 


99,200,000 


11.33 


58,000,000 


July, 






2,037,400,000 


65,700,000 


53,700,000 


88,200,000 


11.26 


70,600,000 


August, . 






1,859,100,000 


60,000,000 


46,500,000 


76,100,000 


10.93 


62,800,000 


September, 






1,614,900,000 


53,800,000 


45,300,000 


71,400,000 


10.30 


49,700,000 


October, . 






1,571,500,000 


50,700,000 


39,500,000 


58,500,000 


11.01 


60,100,000 


November, 






1,586,600,000 


52,900,000 


45,100,000 


64,800,000 


11.01 


52,300,000 


December, 






1.737.800 000 


56,100,000 


41,600,000 


87,400,000 


11.06 


57,200,000 


Total, 


24,267,600,000 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


Average, . 






- 


66,300,000 


52,300,000 


96,900,000 


11.26 


59,400,000 



Average Cost per Million Foot-gallons for Pumping at the Deer Island Station. 

Volume (24,267.6 Million Gallons) X Lift (11.26 Feet)J= 273,253.2 Million Foot-gallons. 



Items. 




Cost per 
Million Foot- 
gallons. 



Labor, 

Coal, 

Oil, . " 

Waste, 

Water 

Packing, 

Miscellaneous supplies and renewals, 

Totals, . . ... 
Labor at screens, .... 



$17,216 44 

11,231 36 

309 60 

156 52 

1,364 80 

138 51 

1,341 33 



$31,758 56 
$3,249 89 



$0. 06301 
.04111 
.00113 
. 00057 
.00499 
. 00051 
.00491 



$0. 11623 



126 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



East Boston Pumping Station. 

At this station are four submerged centrifugal pumps, with im- 
peller wheels 8.25 feet in diameter, driven by triple-expansion 
engines of the Reynolds-Corliss type. 

Contract capacity of 1 pump: 100,000,000 gallons with 19-foot lift. 

Contract capacity of 3 pumps: 45,000,000 gallons each, with 19-foot lift. 

Average duty for the year: 76,500,000 foot-pounds. 

Average quantity raised each day: 64,300,000 gallons. 

Force employed: 4 engineers, 2 relief engineers, 3 firemen, 1 relief fireman, 4 

oilers, 3 screenmen, 1 relief screenman, 3 helpers and 1 laborer. 
Coal used: New River, costing from $4.17 to $5.67 per gross ton. 



Table of Approximate Quantities, Lifts and Duties at the East Boston Pumping 
Station of the North Metropolitan System. 



Months. 


Total 
Pumpage 
(Gallons). 


Average 
per Day 

(Gallons). 


Minimum 

Day 
(Gallons). 


Maximum 

Day 
(Gallons). 


Average 

Lift 
(Feet). 


Average 

Duty (ft.-lbs. 

per 100 lbs. 

Coal). 


1916 

January, . 




2,028,100,000 


65,400,000 


49,800,000 


107,300,000 


14.82 


67,700,000 


February, 








2,029,300,000 


70,000,000 


49,100,000 


160,000,000 


14.83 


76,400,000 


March, 








2,517,800,000 


81,200,000 


61,500,000 


111,300,000 


15.27 


82,000,000 


April, 
May, 








2,473,200,000 


82,400,000 


68,800,000 


106,300,000 


15.35 


74,100,000 








2,271,700,000 


73,300,000 


54,500,000 


121,700,000 


15.12 


75,000,000 


June, 








2,176,200,000 


72,500,000 


60,200,000 


97,200,000 


15.01 


73,200,000 


July, 








1,975,400,000 


63,700,000 


51,700,000 


86,200,000 


14.96 


78,500,000 


August, . 

Mi 

September, 








1,797,100,000 


58,000,000 


44,500,000 


74,100,000 


14.88 


83,500,000 








1,554,900,000 


51,800,000 


43,300,000 


69,400,000 


14.81 


71,200,000 


October, . 








1,509,500,000 


48,700,000 


37,500,000 


56,500,000 


14.69 


78,300,000 


November, 








1,526,600,000 


50,900,000 


43,100,000 


62,800,000 


14.96 


79,700,000 


December, 








1,675,800,000 


54,100,000 


39,600,000 


85,400,000 


14.88 


73,900,000 


Total, 


23,535,600,000 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


Average, 








- 


64,300,000 


50,300,000 


94,900,000 


14.96 


76,500,000 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



127 



Average Cost per Million Foot-gallons for Pumping at the East Boston Station. 

Volume (23,535.6 Million Gallons) X Lift (14.96 feet) = 352,092.6 Million Foot-gallons. 



ITEM3. 




Cost per 
Million Foot- 
gallons. 



Labor, 

Coal 

Oil, 

Waste, 

Water, 

Packing 

Miscellaneous supplies and renewals, 

Totals 

Labor at screens, .... 



$21,185 75 

11,972 14 

395 68 

74 11 

1,491 60 

62 39 

1,327 08 



$36,508 75 
$1,372 50 



$0. 06017 
.03401 
.00112 
.00021 
.00423 
.00018 
.00377 



$0. 10369 



Charlestown Pumping Station. 

At this station are three submerged centrifugal pumps, two of 
them having impeller wheels 7.5 feet in diameter, the other 8.25 
feet in diameter. They are driven by triple-expansion engines of 
the Reynolds-Corliss type. 

Contract capacity of 1 pump: 60,000,000 gallons with 8-foot lift. 

Contract capacity of 2 pumps: 22,000,000 gallons each, with 11-foot lift. 

Average duty for the year: 51,300,000 foot-pounds. 

Average quantity raised each day: 37,300,000 gallons. 

Force employed: 4 engineers, 1 relief engineer, 4 firemen, 3 oilers, 3 screenmen 

and 1 relief screenman. 
Coal used: New River, costing from $4.53 to $5.75 per gross ton. 



128 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc, 



Table of Approximate Quantities, Lifts and Duties at the Charlestown Pumping 
Station of the North Metropolitan System. 



Months. 


Total 
Pumpage 
(Gallons). 


Average 
per Day 
(Gallons). 


Minimum 

Day 
(Gallons). 


Maximum 

Day 
(Gallons). 


Average 

Lift 
(Feet). 


Average 

Duty (ft.-lbs. 

per 100 lbs. 

Coal). 


1916 

January, . 




1,186,900,000 


38,300,000 


30,100,000 


60,300,000 


8.42 


52,800,000 


February, 








1,107,400,000 


38,200,000 


25,500,000 


73,200,000 


8.01 


50,300,000 


March, 








1,335,200,000 


43,100,000 


33,300,000 


56,400,000 


8.52 


51,500,000 


April, 








1,308,200,000 


43,600,000 


34,500,000 


63,700,000 


8.63 


46,400,000 


May, . . 








1,280,100,000 


41,300,000 


31,500,000 • 


69,000,000 


8.71 


51,800,000 


June, 








1.234,200.000 


41,100,000 


33,600,000 


53,200,000 


7.96 


49,000,000 


July, 








1,195,300,000 


38,600,000 


28,500,000 


49,500,000 


8.47 


57,200,000 


August, . 








1,075,200,000 


34,700,000 


26,600,000 


47,700,000 


8.08 


51,200,000 


September, 








1,006,100,000 


33,500,000 


25,200,000 


44,400,000 


8.15 


52,600,000 


October, . 








952,400,000 


30,700,000 


22,800,000 


44,700,000 


8.09 


55,000,000 


November, 








899,400,000 


30,000,000 


22,400,000 


39,900,000 


8.21 


47,200,000 


December, 








1,066,700,000 


34,400,000 


24,500,000 


52,700,000 


8.21 


50,800,000 


Total, 


13,647,100,000 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


Average, . 








- 


37,300,000 


28,200,000 


54,600,000 


8.29 


51,300,000 



Average Cost per Million Foot-gallons for Pumping at the Charlestown Station. 

Volume (13,647.1 Million Gallons) X Lift (8.29 Feet) = 113,134.5 Million Foot-gallons. 



Items. 




Cost per 
Million Foot- 
gallons. 



Labor 

Coal 

Oil 

Waste, ...... 

Water 

Packing, 

Miscellaneous supplies and renewals, 

Totals, 

Labor at screens, .... 



814,514 39 

5,349 00 

111 44 

55 67 

716 40 

36 30 

398 76 



$21,181 96 
$3,305 00 



). 12829 
. 04728 
. 00099 
. 00049 
. 00633 
. 00032 
. 00353 



$0. 18723 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



129 



Alewife Brook Pumping Station. 
The plant at this station consists of two 9-inch Andrews com- 
mercial centrifugal pumps, direct connected by horizontal shafts to 
compound marine engines, together with a pump and engine added 
later. The latter consists of a specially designed engine of the ver- 
tical cross-compound type, having between the cyclinders a centrif- 
ugal pump rotating on a horizontal axis. 

Contract capacity of the 2 original pumps: 4,500,000 gallons each, with 13- 
foot lift. 

Contract capacity of new pump: 13,000,000 gallons, with 13-foot lift. 

Average duty for the year: 18,300,000 foot-pounds. 

Average quantity raised each day: 3,847,000 gallons. 

Force employed: 3 engineers, 1 relief engineer, 3 screenmen and 1 relief screen- 
man. 

Coal used: New River, costing from $4.89 to $10.00 per gross ton. 



Table of Approximate Quantities, Lifts and Duties at the Alewife Brook Pumping 
Station of the North Metropolitan System. 



Months. 


Total 

Pumpage 
(Gallons). 


Average 
per Day 
(Gallons). 


Minimum 

Day 
(Gallons). 


Maximum 

Day 
(Gallons). 


Average 

Lift 
(Feet). 


Average 

Duty (ft. -lbs. 

per 100 lbs. 

Coal). 


1916 

January, . 




129,891,000 


4,190,000 


3,329,000 


6,931,000 


12.97 


18,400,000 


February, 






120,190,000 


4,144,000 


3,229,000 


9,055,000 


13.00 


18,000,000 


March, 






161,319,000 


5,204,000 


4,318,000 


7,049,000 


13.07 


21,200,000 


April, 






193,573,000 


6,452,000 


5,364,000 


7,993,000 


12.99 


25,100,000 


May, 






167,996,000 


5,419,000 


4,026,000 


8,347,000 


12.90 


22,400,000 


June, 






148,996,000 


4,967,000 


3,622,000 


6,754,000 


12.90 


22,200,000 


July, 






118,989,000 


3,838,000 


2,978,000 


4,860,000 


12.83 


19,400,000 


August, . 






79,952,000 


2,579,000 


2,246,000 


3,622,000 


13.04 


15,700,000 


September, 






70,531,000 


2,351,000 


2,035,000 


3,330,000 


12.97 


14,300,000 


October, . 






70,936,000 


2,288,000 


2,078,000 


3,179,000 


12.98 


14,300,000 


November, 






67,693,000. 


2,256,000 


1,994,000 


3,622,000 


13.04 


13,800,000 


December, 






76,838,000 


2,479,000 


2,078,000 


4,027,000 


13.09 


14,400,000 


Total, 


1,406,904,000 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


Average, 






- 


3,847,000 


3,108,000 


5,731,000 


12.98 


18,300,000 



130 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



Average Cost per Million Foot-gallons for Pumping at the Alewife Brook Station. 

Volume (1,406.904 Million Gallons) X Lift (12.98 Feet) = 18,261.61 Million Foot-gallons. 



Items. 


Cost. 


Cost per 
Million Foot- 
gallons. 


Labor, . 
















$7,283 67 


$0. 39885 


Coal, 
















2,266 24 


. 12410 


Oil 
















122 25 


.00670 


Waste, 
















94 54 


.00518 


Water, 
















202 56 


.01109 


Packing, . ... 
















7 36 


.00040 


Miscellaneous supplies and renewals, 
















48 39 


.00265 


Totals, 


$11,850 01 


$0.54897 


Labor at screens, oiling and miscellaneous services, 










$1,825 00 


- 



South Metropolitan System. 
Ward Street Pumping Station. 

At this station are two vertical, triple-expansion pumping engines, 
of the Allis-Chalmers type, operating reciprocating pumps, the 
plungers of which are 48 inches in diameter with a 60-inch stroke. 

Contract capacity of 2 pumps: 50,000,000 gallons each, with 45-foot lift. 

Average duty for the year: 87,474,000 foot-pounds. 

Average quantity raised each day: 29,864,000 gallons. 

Force employed: 4 engineers, 1 relief engineer, 4 firemen, 5 oilers, 4 assistant 

engineers, 1 machinist and 1 laborer. 
Coal used: New River, costing from $4.81 to $5.68 per gross ton. 
Material intercepted at screens during the year, 1,465.2 cubic yards. 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



131 



Table of Approximate Quantities, Lifts and Duties at the Ward Street Pumping 
Station of the South Metropolitan System. 



Months. 


Total 

Pumpage 
(GaUons). 


Average 
, per Dav 
(GaUons). 


Minimum 

Dav 
(GaUons). 


Maximum 
Day 

(Gallons). 


Average 

Lift 
(Feet). 


Average 

Dutv i'ft.-lbs. 

per 100 lbs. 

Coal). 


1916 

January, . 




938,603,000 


30,278,000 


25,213,000 


42,627,000 


42.62 


96,507,000 


February, 






883,450,000 


30.464,000 


24,396,000 


56,896,000 


42.42 


92,193,000 


March, 






1,223,405,000 


39,465,000 


32,S25,000 


47,172,000 


42.57 


97.767,000 


April, 






1,210,016,000 


40,334,000 


34.710,000 


49,650,000 


43.22 


107,431,000 


May, 






1,155,592,000 


37.275,000 


30,763,000 


50,989,000 


43.46 


104,422,000 


June, 






1,430,012,000 


34,767,000 


29,593,000 


45,131,000 


43.47 


97,084.000 


July, 






963,478,000 


31,080,000 


27,147,000 


35,306,000 


43.01 


85,662,000 


August, . 






741,402,000 


23,939,000 


19,332,000 


33,066,000 


42.11 


72,837,000 


September, 






666,897,000 


22,230,000 


19.394,000 


27,902,000 


42.11 


73,454,000 


October, . 






705,274,000 


22,751,000 ; 


19,386,000 


30,340,000 


42.21 


69,202,000 


November, 






669,384,000 


22,313,000 


18,519,000 


31,393,000 


41.91 


76,569,000 


December, 






727,792,000 


23,477,000 


20,199,000 


34,927,000 


41.58 


76,555,000 


Total, 


11,315,305,000 


- 




- 


- 


- 


Average, . 






" 


29,864,000 


25,123,000 


40,450,000 


42.56 


87,474,000 



Records from plunger displacements. 



Average Cost per Million Foot-gallons for Pumping at the Ward Street Station. 

Volume (11,315.3 Minion GaUons) X Lift (42.56 Feet) = 481,579.17 Mil lion Foot-gaUons. 



Items. 




Cost per 
Million Foot- 
gallons. 



Labor, 

Coal 

Oil, 

Waste 

Water 

Packing, 

Miscellaneous supplies and renewals, 

Totals, 

Labor at screens 



$17,715 99 

11,982 IS 

246 69 

36 80 

1,531 20 

427 61 

499 89 



$32,440 36 
$4,340 87 



$0.03679 
.02488 
.00051 
.0000S 
.00318 
.00089 
.00104 



$0.0673^ 



132 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



Quincy Pumping Station. 

At this station are two compound condensing Deane pumping 
engines and one Lawrence centrifugal pump driven by a Sturtevant 
compound condensing engine. 

Contract capacity of 3 pumps: Deane, 3,000,000 gallons; Deane, 5,000,000 gal- 
lons; Lawrence centrifugal, 10,000,000 gallons. 

Average duty for the year: 33,000,000 foot-pounds. 

Average quantity raised each day: 4,780,000 gallons. 

Force employed: 3 engineers, 1 relief engineer, 3 screenmen and 1 relief screen- 
man. 

Coal used: Sterling Elmora, costing from $4.72 to $6.50 per gross ton. 

Materials intercepted at screen during the year, 259 cubic yards. 



Table of Approximate Quantities, Lifts and Duties at the Quincy Pumping Station 

of the South Metropolitan System. 



Months. 


Total 
Pumpage 
(Gallons). 


Average 
per Day 
(Gallons). 


Minimum 

Day 
(Gallons). 


Maximum 

Day 
(Gallons). 


Average 

Lift 
(Feet). 


Average 

Duty (ft. -lbs. 

per 100 lbs. 

Coal). 


1916 

January, . 




137,933,000 


4,449,000 


3,934,000 


5,443,000 


21.04 


29,800,000 


February, 






146,217,000 


5,042,000 


3,782,000 


12,497,000 


21.84 


30,800,000 


March, 






207,970,000 


6,709,000 


5,122,000 


12,382,000 


24.78 


33,200,000 


April, 






228,857,000 


7,628,000 


6,048,000 


11,479,000 


29.23 


38,700,000 


May, 






199,628,000 


6,440,000 


5,039,000 


9,317,000 


27.29 


38,700,000 


June, 






172,776,000 


5,759,000 


4,705,000 


9,794,000 


23.82 


37,800,000 


July, 






160,718,000 


5,184,000 


4,542,000 


6,208,000 


22.51 


38,400,000 


August, . 






140,540,000 


4,532,000 


3,599,000 


5,472,000 


21.33 


35,700,000 


September, 






102,276,000 


3,409,000 


2,859,000 


3,864,000 


21.03 


31,800,000 


October, . 






87,880,000 


2,835,000 


2,549,000 


3,159,000 


21.02 


28,800,000 


November, 






77,240,000 


2,575,000 


2,400,000 


2,815,000 


21.01 


27,300,000 


December, 






86,609,000 


2,794,000 


2,551,000 


3,346,000 


20.97 


24,700,000 


Total, 


1,748,644,000 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


Average, 






- 


4,780,000 


3,928,000 


7,148,000 


22.99 


33,000,000 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



133 



Average Cost per Million Foot-gallons for Pumping at the Quincy Station. 

Volume (1,748.6 Million Gallons) X Lift (22.99 Feet) = 40,200.3 Million Foot-gallons. 



Items. 




Cost per 
Million Foot- 
gallons. 



Labor, 
Coal, 



Oil 

Waste 

Water, . 

Packing, . . . 

Miscellaneous supplies and renewals, 

Totals 

Labor at screens, oiling and miscellaneous services, 



$6,564 02 

2,466 10 

30 68 

34 04 

324 87 

40 51 

297 75 




SO. 16328 
.06134 
. 00076 
. 00084 
.00808 
. 00101 
. 00741 



$0.24272 



Nut Island Screen-house. 

The plant at this house includes two sets of screens in duplicate 
actuated by small reversing engines of the Fitchburg type. Two 
vertical Deane boilers, 80 horse-power each, operate the engines, pro- 
vide heat and light for the house, burn materials intercepted at the 
screens, and furnish power for the Quincy (Hough's Neck) sewage 
lifting station. 

Average daily quantity of sewage passing screens, 62,000,000 gallons. 
Total materials intercepted at screens, 1,170.4 cubic yards. 
Materials intercepted per million gallons of sewage discharge, 1.40 cubic feet. 
Force employed: 3 engineers, 1 relief engineer, 3 screenmen and 1 relief screen- 
man. 
Coal used: New River, costing from $4.75 to $6.60 per gross ton. 

Quincy {Hough's Neck) Sewage Lifting Station. 

At this station are two 6-inch submerged Lawrence centrifugal 
pumps with vertical shafts actuated by two Sturtevant direct- 
current motors. 

The labor and electric energy for this station are supplied from 
the Nut Island screen-house and as used at present it does not 
materially increase the amount of coal used at the latter station. 
The effluent is largely ground water. 

Contract capacity of 2 pumps: about 1,500,000 gallons each, with 20-foot lift. 
Average daily amount pumped: 187,238 gallons. 
Average lift: 15.59 feet. 



134 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



Coal delivered in the Bins of the Sewerage Works Pumping Stations during the Year. 







Gross Tons, Bituminous Coal. 






a 

a 

Ph 

. 

a a 
13 o 
"'£ 

0)02 
P 


a 
'3. 

a • 


o 

<» a 

£.8 

-p <§ 


I 

'3. 

a 

d 
Ph 

d 
* . 

m O 
£'£ 

u rt 

o 


ft 
S 

Ph 

2 <=> 
8.2 

tt-8 

s£ 


bfl 

9 

'S. 

a 

3 

Ph 

■^> 

9 

0> • 

u 

02.8 

<-> ■£ 

03 02 


■ 

S3 
bfl 

a 
% 

a 

3 
Ph 
>> . 

9 ° 
"3 '-3 
<y 


i 

d 
a 
9 
u 
a 
02 

d 

2 ©* 

d 

43 O 

d-d 
525 


d 
o 
H 

m 

8 

o 

© 

p. 
a 
.2 

Ph 


New England Coal & Coke Com- 


736 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


$4 21 


pany. 
New England Coal & Coke Com- 


125 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


4 22 


pany. 
New England Coal & Coke Com- 


385 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


4 23 


pany. 
New England Coal & Coke Com- 


395 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


5 90 


pany. 
New England Coal & Coke Com- 


993 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


5 92 


pany. 
New England Coal & Coke Com- 


- 


729 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


4 17 


pany. 
New England Coal & Coke Com- 


- 


575 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


4 20 


pany. 
New England Coal & Coke Com- 


- 


1,340 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


4 21 


pany. 
New England Coal & Coke Com- 


- 


485 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


5 65 


pany. 
New England Coal & Coke Com- 


- 


369 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


5 67 


pany. 
Metropolitan Coal Company, 


- 


- 


290 


- 


- 


- 


- 


4 53 


Metropolitan Coal Company, 


- 


- 


370 


- 


- 


- 


- 


4 54 


New England Coal & Coke Com- 


■ 


- 


308 


- 


- 


- 


- 


5 75 


pany. 
Locke Coal Company, . 


- 


- 


- 


26 


- 


- 


- 


4 89 


Locke Coal Company, . 




- 


- 


- 


105 


- 


- 


- 


5 13 


Locke Coal Company, . 




- 


- 


- 


152 


- 


- 


- 


5 15 


Locke Coal Company, . 




- 


- 


- 


55 


- 


- 


- 


5 79 


Locke Coal Company, . 




- 


- 


- 


45 


- 


- 


- 


5 88 


Locke Coal Company, . 




- 


- 


- 


50 


- 


- 


- 


10 00 


Staples Coal Company, 




- 


- 


- 


- 


180 


- 


- 


4 81 


Staples Coal Company, 




- 


- 


- 


- 


222 


- 


- 


4 90 


Staples Coal Company, 




- 


- 


- 


- 


385 


- 


- 


4 95 


Staples Coal Company, 




- 


- 


- 


- 


68 


- 


- 


4 97 


Staples Coal Company, 




- 


- 


- 


- 


346 


- 


- 


4 99 


Staples Coal Company, 




- 


- 


- 


- 


303 


- 


- 


5 00 


Staples Coal Company, 




- 


- 


- 


- 


118 


- 


- 


5 59 


Staples Coal Company, 




- 


- 


- 


- 


70 


- 


- 


5 64 


Staples Coal Company, 




- 


- 


- 


- 


207 


- 


- 


5 65 


Staples Coal Company, 




- 


- 


- 


- 


444 


- 


- 


5 68 


Frost Coal Company, . 




- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


115 


- 


4 72 


Frost Coal Company, . 




- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


43 


- 


4 77 



1 Includes adjustments for quality. 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



135 



Coal delivered in the Bins of the Sewerage Works Pumping Stations during the Year 

— Concluded. 





Gross Tons, Bituminous Coal. 






M 


M 


M 


■ 


bJD 


J* 


1 






a 


a 


a 


a 


a 




a 


r 




a 


a 


a 


a 


a 


OQ 




cr 




a 


a 


a 


S3 

Ah 


a 


bfl 





H 




3 


3 


s 




s 


fl 


OQ 






Ph 


Ph 


Ph 


,M . 


Ph 


a 




ai 




t2 


PI 


a 


S 


■& 


a 


-d 


2 




a 


o 


£ 


i-.2 




3 


fl 


O 




£ fl 




o a 


M-S 


h a 


Ph 


03 






to O 

tf-43 


o o 


1o o 

©•43 




0Q.9 


C 


+= 


a 





©CQ 


§co 


JSgq 




03 CQ 


d-3 


3.C 






Q 


H 





«*J 


£ 


a 


55 


Ph 


Frost Coal Company, . 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


73 


- 


$4 78 


Frost Coal Company, . 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- " 


43 


- 


5 00 


Frost Coal Company, . 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


53 


- 


5 01 


Frost Coal Company, . 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


54 


- 


5 04 


Gorman- Leonard Coal Company, 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


521 


- 


5 93 


Frost Coal Company, ... 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


10 


- 


6 50 


Maritime Coaling Company, 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


198 


4 75 


Gorman-Leonard Coal Company, 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


300 


6 60 


Total gross tons, 


2,634 


3,498 


968 


433 


2,343 


912 


498 




Average price per gross ton, . 


$5 11 


$4 55 


$4 92 


$5 85 


$5 21 


$5 56 


$5 87 





Includes adjustments for quality. 



Metkopolitan Sewerage Outfalls. 

The original Deer Island outfall was put into operation in May, 
1895. Sewage has been discharged through this outfall continuously 
except for the period between October 16, 1916, and December 15, 
1916. This outfall is in good condition. The changes contemplated 
at this point are occasioned by the improvement in the method of 
dilution and not because of the failure of the structure. 

The 60-inch outfalls of the South Metropolitan System, two of 
which were completed in 1904 and the third one in 1915, are in good 
condition and free from deposit. . 

During the year the average flow through the North Metropolitan 
outfall at Deer Island has been 66,300,000 gallons of sewage per 
24 hours, with a maximum rate of 157,300,000 gallons during the 
stormy period in March, 1916. The amount of sewage discharged in 
the North Metropolitan District averaged 119 gallons per day for 
each person, taking the estimated population of the district con- 
tributing sewage. If the sewers in this district were restricted to 



136 METROPOLITAN WATER, ETC., BOARD. [P. D. No. 57. 

the admission of sewage proper only, this per capita amount would 
be considerably decreased. 

In the South Metropolitan District an average of 62,000,000 
gallons of sewage has passed daily through the screens at the Nut 
Island screen-house, and has been discharged from the outfalls into 
the outer harbor. The maximum rate of discharge per day, which 
occurred during a heavy storm on February 26, 1916, was 178,000,000 
gallons. The discharge of sewage through these outfalls represents 
the amount of sewage contributed in the South Metropolitan System, 
which was at the rate of 196 gallons per day per person of the 
estimated number contributing sewage in the district. 

The daily discharge of sewage per capita is considerably larger in 
the South Metropolitan District than it is in the North Metropolitan 
District, because, owing to the large size of the High-level Sewer, 
more storm water is at present admitted to the sewers. 

Material Intercepted at the Screens. 

The material intercepted at the screens at the North Metropolitan 
Sewerage stations, consisting of rags, paper and other floating ma- 
terials, has during the year amounted to 2,315 cubic yards. This is 
equivalent to 2.576 cubic feet for each million gallons of sewage 
pumped at Deer Island. 

The material intercepted at the screens at the South Metropolitan 
Sewerage stations has amounted to 2,894.6 cubic yards, equal to 
3.44 cubic feet per million gallons of sewage delivered at the outfall 
works at Nut Island. 

Studies of sewage flows in the Metropolitan sewers and siphons 
indicate that they are free from deposit. 

FREDERICK D. SMITH, 

Chief Engineer of Sewerage Works. 
Boston, January 1, 1917. 



APPENDIX. 



138 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



Appendix No. 1. 



Contracts made and pending during 

[Note. — The details of contracts made before 





1. 

Number 

of 
Contract. 


2. 
WORK. 


3. 

Num- 
ber of 
Bids. 


Amount 


op Bid. 


6. 




4. 

Next to 
Lowest. 


5. 

Lowest. 


Contractor. 


1 


364i 


Furnishing and installing hy- 
draulic machinery at Sud- 
bury Dam, South borough. 


3 


$13,737 00 


$11,760 002 


S. Morgan Smith Co., 
York, Penn. 


2 


364-Ai 


Furnishing and installing elec- 
tric machinery at Sudbury 
Dam, Southborough. 


3 


22,112 00 


19,349 002 


Westinghouse Electric 
& Mfg. Co., Pitts- 
burgh, Penn. 


3 


368 ! 


Masonry tower on Bellevue 
Hill, Boston. 


11 


46,900 00 


46,000 002 


John Cashman & Sons 
Co., Boston. 


4 


369 J 


Laying 60-inch water pipes in 
Newton. 


11 


32,615 00 


32,369 002 


Andrew M. Cusack, 
Boston. 


5 


3731 


Underground cable for hydro- 
electric plant at Sudbury 
Dam. 


1* 


— 


1,182 61 


Safety Insulated Wire 
& Cable Co., Boston. 


6 


374 


75 tons special castings, 


4 


5,250 00 


5,100 002 


Standard Cast Iron 
Pipe & Foundry Co., 
Bristol, Penn. 


7 


375 


Venturi meter tubes, registers 
and parts. 


_5 


-5 


-5 


Builders Iron Foundry, 
Providence, R. I. 


8 


376 


Improvement of Beaver Dam 
Brook. 


9« 


50,437 00 


49,732 50 


- 


9 


377 


Water valves: 5 36-inch, 2 30- 
inch, 4 16-inch and 5 12-inch 
screw lift valves. 


3 


8,100 00 


6,965 002 


Coffin Valve Co., Bos- 
ton. 


10 


378 


Check valves: 3 30-inch, 1 20- 
inch and 1 10-inch check 
valves. 


4 


1,535 00 


1,527 OO 2 


Ludlow Valve Mfg. Co., 
Troy, N. Y. 


11 


378-A 


Check valves: 2 48-inch and 1 
36-inch check valves. 


3 


3,072 00 


2,350 OO 2 


Coffin Valve Co., Bos- 
ton. 



1 Contract completed. 

2 Contract based upon this bid. 

3 Completed except for guarantee with regard to defects that may become manifest during first year 
of operation. 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



139 



Appendix No. 1. 



the Year 1916 — Water Works. 

1916 have been given in previous reports.] 



7. 

Date of Con- 
tract. 



8. 

Date of 
Completion 
of Contract. 



9. 



Prices of Principal Items of Contracts. 



10. 

Value of 

Work done 

Dec. 31, 

1916. 



June 23, 1915 

June 23, 1915 

Apr. 23, 1915 
Apr. 30, 1915 
Dec. 2, 1915 

June 19, 1916 

June 16, 1916 



July 31, 1916 

Aug. 2, 1916 
July 31, 1916 



July 5, 1916 » 

Dec. 15, 19163 

July 11, 1916 

Jan. 13, 1916 

May 25, 1916 



See previous report, . 

See previous report, ....... 

See previous report, 

See previous report, 

See previous report, . . ... 

For all special castings, $68 per ton of 2,000 pounds, 



For 1 10-inch and 1 20-inch meter tube without throat 
section; 1 10-inch throat for 30-inch meter tube and 
1 18-inch throat for 48-inch meter tube with gears 
for adapting Type D registers of larger sizes for use 
with these tubes ; 1 30-inch and 1 36-inch meter tube 
complete; gears for adapting Type D register now 
used with 48-inch meter tube for use with a 36-inch 
meter tube, and 2 sets of short arms for Type D 
registers, $3,395. 



For 36-inch screw lift valves, $865 each; for 30-inch 
screw lift valves, $615 each; for 16-inch screw lift 
valves, $190 each, and for 12-inch screw lift valves, 
$130 each. 



For 30-inch check valves, $465 each; for 20-inch check 
valve, $98, and for 10-inch check valve, $34. 



For 48-inch check valves, $850 each; for 36-inch check 
valve, $650. 



$13,268 53 

20,091 91 

46,436 05 

49,210 01 

1,182 61 

1,800 00 

2,320 00 



3,500 00 

1,250 00 
1,400 00 



8 
9 

10 
11 



4 Two other proposals received which did not conform to requirements of specifications. 

5 Competitive bids not received. 

6 All bids rejected as they exceeded the amount, appropriated for this work. 



140 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



Contracts made and pending during 





1. 

Number 

of 
Contract. 


2. 
WORK. 


3. 

Num- 
ber of 
Bids. 


Amount 


op Bid. 


6. 




4. 

Next to 
Lowest. 


5. , 
Lowest. 


Contractor. 


12 


379 


Street chambers for Venturi 
meter chambers: 6 cham- 
bers. 


2 


$2,022 00 


$1,650 00 2 


Daniel Russell Boiler 
Works, Boston. 


13 


380 » 


Steelwork for chambers for 36- 
inch valves; 14 sets. 


4 


1,148 00 


966 002 


New England Struc- 
tural Co., Boston. 


14 


381 » 


Cast-iron frames and covers; 
about 33,000 pounds. 


1 


- 


907 502 


F. A. Houdlette & Son, 
Boston. 


15 


22-M ' 


Sale and purchase of electric 
energy to be developed at 
Wachusett Dam. 


3 




$5.30* per 

thousand 

kilowatt 

hours. 


Connecticut River 
Transmission Co., 
Boston. 


16 


39-M 


Sale and purchase of electric 
energy to be developed at 
the Sudbury Dam. 


2 


_9 


_9 


Edison Electric Illumi- 
nating Co. of Boston. 


17 


40-Mi 


800 tons bituminous coal for 
Spot Pond pumping station. 


2 


$5.25 per 
ton. 


$5,102 per 
ton. 


Bader Coal Co., Bos- 
ton. 


IS 


41-Mi 


5,000 tons bituminous coal for 
Chestnut Hill pumping sta- 
tions and 80 tons for Pegan 
pumping station, Natick. 


Chest- 
nut 
Hill 
sta- 
tions, 

6. 
Pegan 
sta- 
tion, 
4. 


-10 


-10 


H. N. Hartwell & Son, 
Boston. 














19 


43-M 1 


450 tons bituminous coal for 
Arlington pumping station. 


4 


$4,302 per 
ton. 


$4.25 per 
ton. 


Hetherington & Co., 
Philadelphia, Penn. 


20 


45-M i 


Electrically operated sluice 
gates for Sudbury power 
plant. 


3 


4,125 00 


3,915 00 2 


Coffin Valve Co., Bos- 
ton. 


21 


46-M 


1,500 tons anthracite coal for 
Chestnut Hill pumping sta- 
tions. 


-5 


— 5 


-5 


C. W. Claflin & Co., 
Boston. 


22 


47-M 


450 tons bituminous coal for 
Arlington pumping station, 
and 120 tons for Hyde Park 
pumping station. 


Arling- 
ton 
sta- 
tion, 

3. 
Hyde 
Park 
sta- 
tion, 
2. 


$4.78 per 
ton. 


$4,702 per 
ton. 


Garfield & Proctor 
Coal Co., Boston. 








$4. 50 2 per 
ton. 


$4.48 per 
ton. 




23 


48-M 


800 tons bituminous coal for 
Spot Pond pumping station, 
120 tons at the Natick sta- 
tion on the B. & A. R.R. 
and 40 tons at the Clinton 
station on theB. &. M. R.R. 


Spot 
Pond 
sta- 
tion, 
3. 
Natick, 

2. 
Clin- 
ton, 2. 


$6.16 per 
ton. 

$6.00 per 

ton. 
$6.00 per 

ton. 


$5.60 2 per 
ton. 

$4.58 2 per 

ton. 
$4.83 2 per 

ton. 


Hetherington & Co., 
Philadelphia, Penn. 





1 Contract completed. 

2 Contract based upon this bid. 
5 Competitive bids not received. 

7 Highest bid. 

8 Amount received for energy sold. 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



141 



the Year 1916 — Water Works — Continued. 



7. 

Date of Con- 
tract. 



8. 

Date of 
Completion 
of Contract. 



9. 



Prices of Principal Items of Contracts. 



10. 

Value of 

Work done 

Dec. 31, 

1916. 



Oct. 31, 1916 

Oct. 31, 1916 

Oct. 31, 1916 

Sept. 14, 1910 

Dec. 21, 1914 

June 15, 1915 

June 15, 1915 



June 15, 1915 

Oct. 7, 1915 

June 7, 1916 

June 9, 1916 



June 12, 1916 



Dec. 29, 1916 
Dec. 29, 1916 
Sept. 30, 1916 



May 24, 1916 
May 24, 1916 



May 12, 1916 
June 14, 1916 



For each chamber, $275, 



For steelwork for chambers for 36-inch valves, $69 per 
set. 

For castings, 2% cents per pound, . . 

$5.30 per thousand kilowatt hours 



$6.25 per thousand kilowatt hours. Delivery of en- 
ergy began September 14, 1916. 

See previous report, 

See previous report, . . . . 

See previous report, 

See previous report, 

For Hudson Coal Company's D. & H. Birdseye coal, 
$0.97 per ton of 2,240 pounds at the mines. 

For Peacock coal, $4.70 per ton of 2,240 pounds de- 
livered on cars at the Arlington pumping station, 
and $4.50 per ton of 2,240 pounds delivered on cars 
at the Hyde Park pumping station. 



For Brazil Smokeless coal, $5.60 per ton of 2,240 
pounds delivered in bins at the Spot Pond pumping 
station, $4.58 per ton of 2,240 pounds on cars at the 
Natick station on the Boston & Albany Railroad, 
and $4.83 per ton of 2.240 pounds on cars at the Clin- 
ton station on the Boston & Maine Railroad. 



$825 00 12 



961 17 
913 36 
162,934 82 s 

6,663 218 

4,177 16 
21,294 12 



1,961 45 
3,983 91 

2,920 73 

1,607 70 



1,661 95 



23 



• Contract based upon bid of $6.25 per M. kilowatt hours for entire output. Bids of $5.50 per M. kilowatt 
hours for at least one-third of output and of $3 per M. kilowatt hours for at least two-thirds of output 
also received. 

10 For Sterling Elmora or Riverside coal, $3.97; for Davenport coal, $3.98, and for Alpha Special coal, 
$4 per ton. 

11 Delivery of coal terminated by appointment of a receiver. 



142 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



Contracts made and pending during 





1. 

Number 

of 
Contract. 


2. 
WORK. 


3. 

Num- 
ber of 
Bids. 


Amount 


of Bid. 


6. 




4. 

Next to 
Lowest. 


5. 

Lowest. 


Contractor. 


24 


49-M 


4,500 tons bituminous coal for 
Chestnut Hill pumping sta- 
tions. 


3 


$4.33 per 
ton. 


$4,282 per 
ton. 


E. Russell Norton, 
Boston. 


25 


50-M 


Superstructure of garage at 
Chestnut Hill Reservoir. 


11 


8,100 00 


8,018 00 2 


Crowley & Hickey, 
Boston. 


26 


Agree- 
ment. J 


3 horizontal-type hydraulic 
governors. 


_5 


-5 


_6 


Lombard Governor 
Co., Ashland, Mass. 


27 


Agree- 
ment. 


Sale and purchase of electric 
energy to be developed at 
Wachusett Dam after expi- 
ration of Contract No. 22-M 
and until energy is delivered 
under new contract, pro- 
posals for which were re- 
ceived May 22, 1916. but un- 
der which energy cannot be 
delivered until a transmis- 
sion line has been con- 
structed by the Board. 


-12 


-12 


_12 


New England Power 
Co., Boston. 


28 


Special 
Order. 1 


Tin plate roof for effluent gate 
house at Lake Cochituate. 

■ 


9 


209 00 


178 002 


Framingham Con- 
struction and Sup- 
ply Co., Framing- 
ham, Mass. 


29 


Special 
Order. 1 


Electrically operated gate 
stand for operating sluice 
gate at Sudbury power sta- 
tion, Southborough. 


_5 


-5 


-5 


Coffin Valve Co., Bos- 
ton. 


30 


Special 
Order. 1 


Oil tank for transformers at 
Sudbury power station, 
Southborough. 


5 


285 00 


270 00 2 


Roberts Iron Works 
Co., Cambridge, 
Mass. 


31 


Special 
Order. 


Plumbing at Sudbury power 
station, Southborough. 


3 


214 00 


208 002 


J. B. Moulton, Fra- 
mingham, Mass. 



1 Contract completed. 

2 Contract based upon this bid. 

6 Competitive bids not received. 
• Amount received for energy sold. 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



143 



the Year 1916 — Water Works — Continued. 



7. 

Date of Con- 
tract. 



8. 

Date of 
Completion 
of Contract. 



9. 



Prices of Principal Items of Contracts. 



10. 

Value of 

Work done 

Dec. 31, 

1916. 



June 15, 1916 

Sept. 29, 1916 
July 21, 1915 
Oct. 1, 1916 



Aug. 5, 1916 



For Davenport Miller Vein coal, $4.28 per ton of 2,240 
pounds delivered on cars at the Chestnut Hill 
pumping stations. 

For superstructure of garage complete, $8,018, . 

See previous report, 

$0.0053 per kilowatt hour, 



Jan. 24, 1916 



Feb. 9, 1916 



May 22, 1916 



Nov. 28, 1916 



Apr. 13, 1916 



July 7, 1916 



Sept. 13, 1916 



For whole work, $178, 



For whole work, $450, 



For whole work, $270, 



For whole work, $208, 



$8,329 05 24 



2,000 00 
2,404 00 
8,835 898 



178 00 



460 35 



270 00 



$372,840 98 



25 
26 
27 



2S 



29 



30 



31 



12 Agreement made with the New England Power Company, with which the Connecticut River 
Transmission Company, the contractor under Contract No. 22-M, which was completed September 30, 
1916, has been consolidated. 



144 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



Contracts made and pending during the Year 1916 — Water Works 

Concluded. 
Summary of Contracts, 1895 to 1916, inclusive. 1 



Value of 

Work done Dec. 

31, 1916. 



Distribution Department, 10 contracts, . . 

Sudbury Department, 3 contracts, 

375 contracts completed from 1896 to 1915, inclusive, 

Deduct for work done on 11 Sudbury Reservoir contracts by the city of Boston, 
Total of 388 contracts, 

1 In this summary contracts charged to maintenance are excluded. 



$108,615 59 

34,543 05 

17,246,018 99 



$17,389,177 63 
512,000 00 



$16,877,177 63 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



145 



6 
x 

M 
ft 

H 

P-. 

PL, 

< 



>-+ 

1! 

.o 



•to 
•<o 

r-o 
O 

© 

<4> 



HO 
© 

<3 



o 

•to 

co 



*cO 

e 
ft? 

r-o 

mo 
O 



O 

I-H 
pq 
< 
Eh 





c© 


CO 


US 


CO 


o 


OS 


r» 


t- 


"3 


1-H 


ws 


CO 


eo 


CO 




CO 


tH 


us 


CO 


<M 


CN 


t- 


«0 


»— 1 


OS 


CN 


CN 


•* 


OS 


•8[B^OX 


CM 


t~ 


OS 


Tft 


o 


OS 


O0 


^J 


O0 


T-l 


o 


i-H 


eo 


OS 




"* 


■>* 


CO 


•"*! 


•* 


CO 


co 


tH 


CO 


>* 


■* 


tH 


rH 


co 




t~ 


1^ 


■** 


CO 


o 


CO 


o 


CO 


O0 


. 


OS 


t^ 




CN 


•jaqraaoaQ 


no 


o 


oo 


t- 


<M 


y ~l 


CN 


co 


'"■' 


CO 




o 


00 


CN 


CN 


CO 


CN 


CN 


co 


CO 


co 


co 


CO 


CO 


CO 


eo 


CN 


eo 




lr~ 


CO 


CN 


00 


CO 


US 


OS 


US 


00 


00 


-* 




us 


oo 


uaqxnaAoj^ 


O 


■** 


CNI 


oo 


CM 


CN 


o 


US 


1-1 


00 


oo 


"5 




CN 




CO 


CO 


CO 


CN 


CM 


CM 


CN 


CN 


CN 


t-l 




CN 


CO 


CN 




t«- 


CO 


US 


CN 


t» 


US 


1>- 


us 


00 


r>. 


oo 


1-H 


CN 


OS 


•jaqo^OQ 


Tt< 


us 


CN 


Tji 


CO 


■HI 


■* 


CO 


CN 


CN 


CO 


"# 


•<* 


•^ 




TH 


1-H 


CO 


CO 


CN 


OS 


o 


r-~ 


o 


US 


o 


o 


i-H 


o 


•jaqraaq.dag 


1 


co 


!>• 


CO 


o 


CO 


US 


OS 


CO 


■Hi 


oo 


CO 


CN 


00 




"* 


•>* 


co 


Tj* 


CN 














CN 


Tj< 


1-1 




■<# 


oo 


CM 


co 


CO 


o 


t>- 


r—t 


US 


00 


CN 


00 


CN 


1-1 


•q.sn§ny 


t- 


t^ 


CO 


t^ 


CN 


o 


t-- 


o 


t~ 


t~ 


CO 


OS 


t>. 


o 


i— i 


1-1 


ft 


1-1 


CN 


CN 


r-t 


CN 


1-1 


CN 


CN 


i-H 


i-H 


CN 




CO 


CO 


t~ 


o 


oo 




-* 


r^ 


OS 


os 


oo 


CO 


CO 


d 


•ipif 


OS 


us 


CO 


us 


1— 1 


'-• 


OS 


■* 


00 


1-H 


<N 


o 


CO 


US 


CO 


■* 


US 


US 


«o 


** 


us 


CO 


us 


eo 


us 


US 


"5 




us 


^ 


CO 


oo 


o 


us 


tH 


OS 


US 


CO 


OS 


00 


t~ 


l>. 


•eutif 


oo 


CO 


CN 


us 


OS 


CO 


t>- 


t* 


•HI 


o 


US 


CO 


us 


t>. 


co 


eo 


CO 


eo 


■* 


n< 


■* 


"* 


US 


CO 


US 


us 


CO 


■* 




cn 


"* 


o 


OS 


tH 


tH 


oo 


US 


o 


CO 


CN 


co 


** 


eo 


■A"BH 


t>. 


CN 


OS 


■* 


••* 


>o 


CN 


■HI 


<N 


US 


OS 


■* 


co 


tH 


CO 


*# 


*"' 


co 


co 


CO 


CO 


eo 


co 


co 


eo 


eo 


co 


eo 




•^ 


OO 


eo 


CO 


us 


OS 


CO 


CO 


CN 


TH 


CO 


■* 


us 


OS 


•{tidy 


1—1 


t- 


t^ 


OS 


1-H 


o 


o 


■* 


1-1 


t- 


CN 


i-H 


CO 


i-H 


CO 


co 


co 


co 


•hi 


tH 


** 


•* 


tH 


■* 


IO 


■^ 


CO 


"* 




•* 


OS 


CO 


CO 


CN 


us 


OO 


00 


CN 


00 


i-H 


CN 


CN 


CO 


•qoxBj\[ 


«# 


v°i 


o 


oo 


o 


OS 


U0 


o 


CO 


'- • 


** 


OS 


CO 


1-H 


CN 


co 


CO 


co 


T* 


CO 


"* 


■* 


•>* 


-* 


"<* 


eo 


eo 


^ 




us 


CN 


CN 


H* 


est 


CO 


o 


1—1 


CO 


US 


1-1 


t-- 


oo 


1-H 


•A'xBtuqaj 


^ 


«* 


t^ 


o 


OS 


OS 


CO 


CN 


CO 


CO 


t* 


00 


OS 


OS 


us 


CO 


US 


CO 


us 


US 


lO 


CO 


us 


»o 


us 


us 


us 


US 




■hi 


t^ 


us 


"*« 


I-H 


o 


■* 


t>. 


CN 


t^ 


us 


OS 


o 


eo 


•A'jBira'Bf 


US 


l>. 


US 


US 


US 


US 


US 


us 


US 


00 


US 


us 


CO 


us 




























T3 
































73 

cu 






























^a 


H 


























03 

is 


M 

cu 

03 


3 « 




















u 






HJ 


* 




















u 






* 


>J 


Ah 


' 


' 


' 


' 


i 


s 
s 


i 

Q 

•0 

CI 








m 


CO 


i 

Xi 




a 
o 

-*> 

cu 


a 
o 

So 


bD 


a 
o 
-t-> 



>> 

g 


1 


cu 

p 


CD 

fS 


• 


03 
cu 


o 
o3 

aT 


■0 

cu 




2 


S 

CU 

m 

5 

•-9 


cu 
GO 


o 

m 


02 


1 


3 
<3 


M 

o 

o 


^3 

8 


T5 

a 
o 
A* 


bO 
03 
u 

cu 

> 


bO 
03 

o 

> 


bO 
03 
M 

cu 
























< 


<5 


<: 




• 


psqsia^BjVi 




paq 


BX&yBfa 


(A 


CO 

CD 

J=l 


o 




WesnqoBjVl 




All 


iqpng 


1-4 


o 


OJ 









146 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



Table No. 2. — Rainfall in Inches at Jefferson, Mass., in 1916. 



Day of Month. 


>> 

u 
03 

a 

03 


u 

03 
3 

Sh 

42 


O 

u 

03 


< 


>> 

03 



c 

1-9 


3 

1-5 


n 

<5 


u 
9 

42 

a 

s 

a 
m 


u 

42 
Q 
O 

O 


u 

B 

> 



u 

42 

s 


t> 

P 


1 


2 




















0.12 


- 


2, 










0.741 


2 


0.091 


- 


- 


- 


2 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


3, 










- 


2 


- 


- 


2 


0.88 


0.65 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


4, 










- 


1.26 1 


- 


0.11» 


0.67 


- 


2 


- 


- 


- 


2 


- 


5, 










0.32 


- 


- 


- 


- 


0.65 


0.12 


- 


- 


- 


0.52 


- 


6, 










- 


- 


2 


2 


0.12 


- 


- 


- 


0.26 


- 


- 


- 


7, 










- 


- 


2 


0.143 


0.09 


2 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


0.07 


8, 










- 


2 


1.59 3 


2 


0.17 


2 


2 


0.43 


0.14 


- 


- 


- 


9, 




- 






- 


0.17» 


- 


0.901 


- 


2 


2 


2 


- 


- 


0.10 


0.34 


10, 










0.213 


- 


0.471 


- 


- 


2.21 


2 


0.14 


- 


- 


- 


- 


11, 










- 


2 


- 


- 


- 


0.30 


0.70 


0.17 


- 


- 


- 


2 


12, 










2 


2 


- 


0.123 


- 


0.20 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


0.85« 


13, 










0.17 


1.37 1 


0.76i 


- 


- 


- 


0.34 


0.13 


- 


0.27 


2 


- 


14, 










- 


- 


2 


0.693 


2 


2 


- 


- 


- 


- 


0.363 


- 


15, 










- 


- 


0.52i 


- 


2 


2 


- 


- 


2.86 


- 


- 


O.631 


16, 










0.07 1 


- 


- 


- 


2 


2 


- 


- 


- 


- 


0.05i 


- 


17, 










- 


- 


- 


0.09 


2.65 


1.26 


2 


- 


- 


0.08 


0.09i 


- 


18, 










- 


0.121 


- 


- 


- 


- 


0.54 


- 


2 


- 


- 


- 


19, 










- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


0.60 


- 


- 


0.50 


0.98 


- 


- 


20, 










0.02' 


- 


0.011 


- 


- 


- 


2 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


21, 










- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


0.12 


2 


- 


- 


0.13 


- 


2 


22, 


y 








0.08 


- 


2 


2 


- 


- 


2 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1.06» 


23, 










- 


2 


0.551 


2 


0.26 


- 


2.41 


0.46 


- 


- 


1.26 


- 


24, 










- 


2 


- 


0.90 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


25, 










- 


3.50» 


- 


0.11 


- 


0.39 


2 


- 


- 


0.07 


- 


- 


26, 










- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


2 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


27, 










0.06 


- 


- 


2 


- 


- 


1.77 


2 


- 


- 


- 


2 


28, 










- 


- 


- 


0.723 


0.05 


- 


- 


0.45 


- 


- 


- 


0.12 


29, 










- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


0.55 


- 


2 


- 


30, 










0.10 


- 


- 


- 


0.23 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


0.93 


- 


31, 


































1 


otals 


, 


1.77 


6.42 


3.99 


3.78 


4.24 


6.61 


6.53 


1.78 


4.31 


1.53 


3.43 


3.07 



1 Snow. 



Total for the year, 47.46 inches. 
Rainfall included in that of following day. 



3 Rain and snow. 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



147 





Table No. 3. 


— Rainfall in 


Inches at Framingham,, Mass., 


in 1916. 




Day of Month. 


$3 
a 

1-5 


>> 

u 


O 


< 




a 
i-s 


>> 

3 
1-9 


+3 

on 
P 
M 

1 


C 
<D 
42 


a> 

ft 

XJl 


u 

0) 

O 
-(5 
O 

O 


u 
<a 
,0 

a 

> 



J2 

1 
O 


1 • 


0.26 3 


- 


2 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


0.04 


- 


2, 










0.493 


2 


0.251 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


3, 










- 


1.201 


0.16i 


- 


2 


2 


0.29 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


4, 










- 


- 


0.021 


0.173 


0.20 


0.68 


2 


- 


- 


- 


2 


2 


5, 










0.15 


- 


- 


- 


2 


0.13 


0.39 


- 


2 


- 


0.20 


0.08 


6, 










- 


2 


2 


0.04 


0.27 


0.02 


- 


- 


2 


- 


- 


- 


7, 


. 






. 


- 


0.04 


0.75 8 


- 


- 


2 


- 


- 


0.51 


- 


- 


- 


8, 










- 


2 


0.63 1 


2 


0.02 


2 


2 


2 


2 


- 


- 


- 


9, 










- 


0.201 


2 


0.873 


- 


2 


2 


2 


0.15 


- 


- 


0.26 


10, 










0.243 


- 


0.273 


- 


- 


2 


1.12 


0.40 


- 


- 


- 


- 


11, 










- 


0.321 


- 


2 


>- 


1.16 


0.11 


0.16 


- 


- 


- 


2 


12, 










2 


2 


2 


0.14 


- 


0.40 


- 


- 


- 


- 




0.65 s 


13, 










0.14 


1.261 


0.25i 


- 


- 


- 


0.25 


0.17 


- 


0.20 


2 


- 


14, 










- 


- 


2 


0.68* 


2 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


0.28* 


- 


15, 


■ 








2 


- 


2 


- 


2 


- 


- 


- 


0.63 


- 


- 


0.751 


16, 










0.021 


0.101 


0.93i 


- 


2 


2 


- 


- 


- 


- 


0.03i 


- 


17, 










- 


- 


- 


0.06 


2.51 


2 


2 


- 


- 


- 


0.06i 


- 


18, 










- 


0.22 


2 


0.04 


• - 


1.37 


0.36 


- 


2 


- 


- 


- 


19, 










- 


- 


0.031 


- 


0.04 


0.47 


- 


- 


0.24 


2 


- 


- 


20, 










0.01 1 


- 


2 


- 


0.05 


- 


2 


- 


- 


0.93 


- 


- 


21, 










- 


- 


0.021 


0.01 


- 


0.14 


1.01 


- 


- 


0.03 


- 


2 


22, 










0.03 


- 


0.60> 


2 


2 


- 


2 


- 


0.02 


- 


- 


1.223 


23, 










- 


0.071 


- 


2 


2 


- 


0.75 


0.52 


- 


- 


0.67 


- 


24, 










- 


2 


- 


0.88 


0.12 


- 


- 


0.14 


- 


- 


- 


- 


25, 










- 


2 


- 


2 


- 


0.28 


2 


- 


- 


0.26 


- 


- 


26, 










2 


2.523 


- 


0.20 


- 


- 


2 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


27, 










0.07 


- 


- 


2 


2 


- 


0.65 


0.03 


- 


- 


- 


2 


28, 










- 


- 


- 


1.003 


2 


- 


- 


0.58 


- 


- 


- 


0.173 


29, 












- 


2 


- 


2 


- 


- 


- 


0.14 


- 


2 


- 


30, 










2 


- 


0.04 


- 


0.33 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


0.97 


- 


31, 










0.09 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


0.18 


- 


- 


0.03 


- 


- 


Totals, 


1.50 


5.93 


3.95 


4.09 


3.54 


4.65 


5.11 


2.00 


1.69 


1.45 


2.25 


3.13 



1 Snow. 



Total for the year, 39.29 inches. 
8 Rainfall included in that of following day. 



8 Rain and snow. 



148 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



Table No. 4. — Rainfall in Inches at Chestnut Hill Reservoir, 1916. 



Date. 


Amount. 


Duration. 


Date. 


Amount. 


Duration. 


Jan. 1, . 


.261 


7.15 a.m. to 10.45 A.M. 


May 4, . 


.16 


12.35 a.m. to 7.30 a.m. 


Jan. 1, 






.04 


10.45 a.m. to 4.20 p.m. 


May 6, 




.21 


2.25 a.m. to 10.30 a.m. 


Jan. 2, 






.62» 


2.35 a.m. to 10.20 a.m. 


May 7, 




.03 


8.15 p.m. to 8.35 p.m. 


Jan. 2, 






.03 


10.20 a.m. to 6.00 p.m. 


May 8, 




.02 


8.00 p.m. to 10.45 p.m. 


Jan. 5, 






.16 


5.50 a.m. to 11.15 P.M. 


May 14, 




\ 2.67 


10.30 p.m. to 


Jan. 10, 






.25» 


8.30 a.m. to 12.30 p.m. 


May 17, 




2.45 p.m. 


Jan. 10, 






.09 


12.30 p.m. to 5.00 p.m. 


May 20, 




.15 


2.40 p.m. to 7.00 p.m. 


Jan. 13, 






.18 


6.10 A.M. to 11.20 A.M. 


May 23, 




.07 


4.05 a.m. to 5.00 p.m. 


Jan. 16, 






.05' 


1.35 A.M. to 9.05 A.M. 


May 27, 




} - 14 


5.45 p.m. to 


Jan. 22, 






.05 


5.00 p.m. to 8.15 p.m. 


May 29, 




7.30 a.m. 


Jan. 27, 






.04 


2.00 a.m. to 7.30 A.M. 


May 30, 




.03 


4.35 a.m. to 7.15 a.m. 


Jan. 30, 






.10 


3.00 p.m. to 10.00 p.m. 


May 30, 




\ .08 


4.50 p.m. to 








May 31, 




2.20 a.m. 








1.87 
















3.56 




Feb. 2, 




1 1.23» 


8.40 a.m. to 




Feb. 3, 






12.30 p.m. 














Feb. 7, 






.03 


1.20 a.m. to 5.35 a.m. 








Feb. 8, 






.19» 


11.30 p.m. to 6.00 a.m. 


June 3, . 


\ 1.00 


5.40 p.m. to 


Feb. 11, 






\ .331 


3.15 p.m. to 


June 4, 




12.10 A.M. 


Feb. 12, 






J 


5.20 a.m. 


June 5, 




.10 


2.30 p.m. to 9.00 p.m. 


Feb. 12, 






\ .90' 


1.00 p.m. to 


June 6, 




.03 


2.30 p.m. to 4.15 p.m. 


Feb. 13, 






J 


8.00 p.m. 


June 7, 




.06 


12.45 a.m. to 5.50 a.m. 


Feb. 16, 






i .101 


11.25 p.m. to 


June 8, 




\ 1.24 


10.25 p.m. to 


Feb. 17, 






J 


1.25 A.M. 


June 11, 




/ 


7.30 a.m. 


Feb. 18, 






.15 


3.00 p.m. to 8.00 p.m. 


June 11, 




i .52 


2.45 p.m. to 


Feb. 23, 






.031 


2.10 p.m. to 5.15 p.m. 


June 13, 




J 


2.15 p.m. 


Feb. 24, 






1 2.692 


8.40 p.m. to 


June 16, 




\ 2.04 


11.45 p.m. to 


Feb. 26, 






3.30 p.m. 


June 17, 




f 


5.30 p.m. 








June 19, 




J .53 


1.50 p.m. to 








5.65 




June 20, 
June 21, 




14 


12.40 a.m. 
6.10 p.m. to 8.55 p.m. 


Mar. 2, . 


.37i 
| .15i 


3.55 a.m. to 2.45 p.m. 


June 25, 




!37 


L50 a.m! to 10ll5 p.m! 


Mar. 3, 






6.00 p.m. to 








Mar. 4, 






3.10 A.M. 




6.03 




Mar. 5, 
Mar. 6, 






.061 

\ .77i 


2.00 a.m. to 4.05 A.M. 
5.15 p.m. to 


















Mar. 7, 






4.20 a.m. 








Mar. 7, 






.05 


4.20 a.m. to 6.00 p.m. 


July 3, . . 


.21 


12.25 a.m. to 5.20 a.m. 


Mar. 8, 






.73i 


12.45 p.m. to 11.35 p.m. 


July 3, 




.71 


2.40 p.m. to 6.20 p.m. 


Mar. 10, 






.221 


5.50 a.m. to 12.30 p.m. 


July 4, 




\ .43 


7.45 a.m. to 


Mar. 13, 






.19i 


1.35 a.m. to 8.30 A.M. 


July 5, 




| 


1.30 p.m. 


Mar. 14, 






\ 1.021 


6.30 p.m. to 


July 8, 




\ .66 


1.40 p.m. to 


Mar. 16, 






) 


8.10 A.M. 


July 10, 




/ 


10.00 A.M. 


Mar. 22, 






\ .57i 


12.30 p.m. to 


July 11, 




.18 


10.15 a.m. to 3.30 p.m. 


Mar. 23, 






) 


3.25 a.m. 


July 13, 




.21 


3.00 p.m. to 8.00 p.m. 


Mar. 29, 






.05 


7.40 p.m. to 10.30 p.m. 


July 18, 




.23 


3.55 a.m. to 6.15 a.m. 








July 20, 




\ .64 


10.45 p.m. to 








4.18 




July 21, 
July 23, 
July 24, 




I .77 


4.00 p.m. 
1.25 a.m. to 


Apr. 4, 


\ .IP 


7.15 a.m. to 




' «, 


5.15 a.m. 


Apr. 5, 








7.30 a.m. 


July 25, 




.04 


12.15 a.m. to 2.50 a.m. 


Apr. 6, 






1 .03 


11.50 p.m. to 


July 25, 




} n 


7.30 p.m. to 


Apr. 7, 








2.25 a.m. 


July 27, 




5.25 a.m. 


Apr. 8, . 






I .282 


4.30 p.m. to 


July 27, 




.07 


10.15 a.m. to 6.00 P.M. 


Apr. 9, . 








4.50 a.m. 


July 31, . 




.33 


4.10 p.m. to 4.35 p.m. 


Apr. 9, . 






.21 


7.30 a.m. to 10.30 A.M. 








Apr. 9, . 






.26i 


1.35 p.m. to 8.15 p.m. 




5.19 




Apr. 12, . 
Apr. 14, . 






.11 
\ .702 


2.10 A.M. to 9.15 A.M. 

8.40 a.m. to 


















Apr. 15, . 






{ 


2.50 a.m. 








Apr. 17, . 






i .10 


4.20 p.m. to 


Aug. 8, . . 


.42 


2.30 p.m. to 11.45 p.m. 


Apr. 18, . 






J 


4.05 a.m. 


Aug. 9, . 




\ .54 


7.45 a.m. to 


Apr. 18, . 






.03 


4.40 p.m. to 10.00 p.m. 


Aug. 11, . 




f 


5.00 A.M. 


Apr. 21, . 






.02 


7.20 a.m. to 10.20 a.m. 


Aug. 11, . 




1 .22 


11.45 p.m. to 


Apr. 22, . 






\ 1.18 


10.05 a.m. to 


Aug. 12, . 




/ 


4.30 a.m. 


Apr. 24, . 






j 


7.00 p.m. 


Aug. 13, . 




.14 


5.45 a.m. to 3.10 p.m. 


Apr. 26, . 






\ .23 


1.35 A.M. to 


Aug. 24, . 




.09 


8.05 A.M. to 10.00 A.M. 


Apr. 27, . 






J 


8.00 A.M. 


Aug. 27, . 




.09 


7.50 p.m. to 9.05 p.m. 


Apr. 27, . 






\ 1.482 


10.55 p.m. to 


Aug. 28, . 




1.28 


9.50 a.m. to 6.00 p.m. 


Apr. 28, . 






/ 


8.00 p.m. 




















2.78 






4.74 









1 Snow* 



2 Rain and snow. 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



149 



Table No. 4. — Rainfall in Inches at Chestnut Hill Reservoir in 1916 — 

Concluded. 



Date. ; Amount. 


Duration. 


Date. 


Amount. 


Duration. 


Sept. 5, . 


\ .27 


4.30 p.m. to 




Nov. 1, . 


.04 


9.30 a.m. to 11.15 A.M. 


Sept. 7, . 




l 




7.30 a.m. 


Nov. 5, 




.15 


4.15 A.M. to 10.50 A.M. 


Sept. 8, . 




I .13 


8.10 p.m. to 




Nov. 13, 




1 .232 


8.15 p.m. to 


Sept. 9, . 




/ 




4.50 a.m. 


Nov. 14, 




3.00 p.m. 


Sept. 15, . 




1 .69 


7.45 a.m. to 




Nov. 15, 




.04* 


3.30 a.m. to 5.45 a.m. 


Sept. 16, . 




j 




1.50 a.m. 


Nov. 17, 




.072 


4.15 p.m. to 11.40 p.m. 


Sept. 18, . 




1 - 12 


9.30 p.m. to 




Nov. 23, 




1 .50 


12 Noon to 


Sept. 19, . 




J 




5.20 a.m. 


Nov. 24, 




J 


1.25 A.M. 


Sept. 29, . 




1 -^ 


7.45 p.m. to 




Nov. 29, 




\ U 


10.15 p.m. to 


Sept. 30, . 




/ 




2.25 a.m. 


Nov. 30, 




j 


4.45 a.m. 










Nov. 30, 




\ ,71 


10.00 A.M. to 








1.45 






Dec. 1, 




/ 


1.30 A.M. 






1.88 














Oct. 13, . . 


\ .22 


4.45 p.m. to 


1.50 A.M. 








Oct. 14, 










Oct. 19, 






( .72 


9.00 a.m. to 




Dec. 4, . 


\ .10 


6.45 a.m. to 


Oct. 20, 






f 




3.45 a.m. 


Dec. 5, 




j 


7.15 A.M. 


Oct. 20, 






\ .04 


6.45 p.m. to 




, Dec. -9, 




\ .34 


4.15 p.m. to 


Oct. 21, 






J 




2.30 a.m. 


! Dec. 10, 




j 


12.40 a.m. 


Oct. 21, 






.13 


9.30 a.m. to 1( 


| Dec. 11, 




1 .722 


6.15 p.m. to 


Oct. 26, 






.16 


12.05 a.m. to 


2.30 a.m. 


1 Dec. 12, 




j 


6.45 p.m. 










i Dec. 15, 




j .81i 


7.30 a.m. to 








1.27 






! Dec. 16, 
Dec. 21, 
Dec. 22, 




.18i 
.98 


8.00 A.M. 
5.10 A.M. to 7.30 A.M. 








8.00 a.m. to 6.20 p.m. 








Dec. 27, 




.08 


10.00 A.M. to 10.00 P.M. 








Dec. 28, 




.10 


9.15 a.m. to 11.45 A.M. 






3.31 







1 Snow. 



Total for year, 41.91 inches. 



2 Rain and snow. 



150 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



o; 


3! 


CM 


o 


CO O 


OO 


00 CO 


00 00 


-<*< CO 


© >o 


CO 


at 


Ol 


^f 


>o 


CO 


oo 


o 






ob 


cs 


9 


■** t^ 


■Q 


us o 


"5 O 


t^ 00 


US 00 


t^ 




CM 


us 


CO 


Hj< 


oo 


CO 




-»-s 
O 


_l 


r^ 


_ 


CM Ki 


00 


02 CO 


CO OS 


U0 t>. 


^i CO 


on 


Q 


„H 


on. 


1+1 


CO 


»« 


»o 




»o 


us 


TT< 


no m 


9 


■**! ■* 


"C* -* 


T»< CO 


CO 


«* 


hH 


CO 


'Cf 


•"* 


© 


Hj* 




H 
































© 






i 

S . 




on 


CO 


in co 


o 


© 00 


O CO 


O CO 


© 'Jl 




US 


CO 


a. 




1-H 


CM 


t>. 




H* 


© 


o 


rt CO 


CM 


© 00 


r-~ cm 


1*1 o 


© co 


© 


a> 


lr^ 


W 


I— 1 


00 


CO 








CO 


CO 


CM 


CO © 


t^ 


CO CM 


CO ^ct* 


^cH CO 


CO CM 


co 


•* 


Ol 


CO 


lO 


CM 


CO 


^ 




Q 






































i 

a . 

a> si 


CM 




-f 


"^ CO 


EQ 


CO CM 


CM l» 


rji m 


OO t>- 


■* 


CM 


C2 


t^ 


CM 


US 


»c 


00 




CO 


CO 


SB 


© 


CO CO 


lO CM 


t~ o 


CO i-H 


1-H 


© 


LO 


as 


<H 


»■* 


«o 


co 




> & 


t» 


CO 


i—i 


CO CM 


o 


CM t-H 


CM CM 


lO 1-H 


1-H Tjl 


-# 


•<*< 


CM 


c? 


CO 


co 


© 


co 




£ 






































«4 


H*f 




« 


o o 


CO 


CO 00 


!-H IC 


OO CO 


© © 


-rt< 


co 


CM 


oo 


>o 


CM 


U5 


H* 




^2 


© 


eg 


t^ 


© t- 


co 


■>* t~ 


00 C33 


CO 1-H 


l^ T* 


CM 


US 


© 


00 


© 


■* 


oo 


CO 




O 
■+-> 
o 


© 


r~ 


CM 


CM CO 


CO 


H* i-H 


^H CO 


US CM 


H i-H 


lO 


CM 


CO 


~ 


CO 


1-H 


CO 
CO 


CO 




o 






































1 

s . 


eo 


iO 




CO O 


CO 


CO o 


© -H 


o ■*< 


© CO 


"*f 


1^ 


3 


us 


CO 


^^ 


a> 


eo 




o> 




r* ' 


i* i-h 


CM 


© CO 


OS CO 


ifi O 


© 00 


© 


1—1 


f* 


lO 


CM 


us 


>CS 






«H 


CO 


i*< 


CO CO 


-<*< 


CM lO 


CO CM 


OS i-H 


CO CM 


CO 


CM 


Tt< 


© 


i-H 


"* 


o 


co 




CO 






































go 

3 


t~ 


1— I 


O 


00 00 


us 


00 00 


CI -* 


CO O 


© t- 


© 


OS 


lO 


© 


© 


CM 


1-H 


© 




■* 


CO 


CM 


»— i no 


Cs 


OO CO 


o co 


CM ■* 


"5 00 


-* 


O0 


© 


»o 


© 


r^ 


t>- 


1-H 




feO 


eo 


o 


CO 




CO 




CO ■* 


tH CO 


co co 


lO 


CM 


CO 


«* 


© 


l-H 


CO 


H* 




3 




1— 1 




























oo 






<5 








































»o 




CM 


© CO 


r- 




C5 CM 


co no 


»C CM 


CO 


i« 


r^ 


CM 


© 


© 


t* 


H* 




>> 


CO 


o 


oo 


CM CO 


00 


■* oo 


CO "5 


O OO 


CM *ti 


m 


CO 


CO 


as 


© 


CO 


r~ 


CM 




3 


oo 


CO 


CO 


CO us 


CO 


CO CO 


tli to 


CO CO 


-# ^H 


CM 


CM 


CM 


CO 


00 


U5 


s 


•* 






1— I 




1-H 


© r-H 




t» «cH 


oo io 


^*< OJ 


CO © 


r— 


on 


© 


© 


on 


t- 


© 


O0 




O 


.-H 


1"H 


lO 


"5 »C 


US 


CO Tf 


O0 C3S 


»0 CM 


© CO 


CO 


-* 


as 


© 


■H 


o 


t^- 


© 




3 

1-5 


us 


CO 


lO 


CO »-H 


CM 


o co 


■* »o 


CO «-H 


co ^ 


CM 


© 


© 


CM 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 














1-H 




















t-- 








CO 


on 




Tt< CM 


«* 


'C" C5 


CO oo 


CO ^** 


ift CO 


© 


CO 


1-H 




r^ 


"Ct< 


t<- 


© 




>> 


o 


CO 


CO 


CO o 


CM 


CM O 


00 l« 


C75 CO 


CO 1-H 


o 


fc» 


t^ 


© 


© 


CO 


'-H 


CO 






no 


CO 




Tf< t~- 


CM 


i-H CM 


O CO 


CM HO 


CM CM 




tO 


CO 


CO 




co 


© 


CO 






CM 


CO 


">* 


CO ^f 


CO 


O "5 


O CM 


lO CM 


i-H i-H 


M 


CO 


© 




© 


"5 


"5 






■H 


eo 


^ 


© 


t- CO 


CO 


1-H •** 


CO 1-H 


CO CO 


t~ © 


CM 


© 


as 


as 


OO 


CO 


CM 


oo 




a 


CM 


*# 


,_, 


CM © 


>* 


co t^ 


CM CO 


CM CM 


O CO 


CM 


1< 


CO 


■* 


i-H 


CO 


CO 


eo 




< 
































t>l 










t^ 


its 


as cm 


r^ 


oo o 


Ifl t~ 


CM t^ 


O0 © 
CO © 


© 


© 


on 


CO 


CO 


CM 


H*4 


i-H 




O 


CM 


t^ 


T-< oo 


CM 


"5 -<ti 


OS -H 


OO t^ 


t~ 


CO 


»o 


CO 


© 


co 


CM 


•H 






■«* 


CM 


CO 


co US 


US 


CO CO 


co "0 


^H CM 


H*t ^H 


CO 


>o 


>o 


■*! 


© 


CO 


CM 


»* 




s 
































00 






1 

J2 £ 


CO 


o 


CM 


© co 


T— 1 


CM CO 


CM -^< 


CM CM 


© -rt* 


CO 


Ol 


up 


CO 


CM 


00 


i-H 


CM 




OO 
CM 


CO 
CO 


US 


CO i-h 

00 »-H 


CD 


■*»< CO 
•** CM 


i-H CM 


CO oo 
CM -«*i 


i-H CM 

© kO 


-# 
OJ 


ij< 


VO 
CM 


>o 

CO 


co 

OS 


© 


CO 
CO 


oo 

co 




<a os 
































t^ 






Pn 






































>> 

(-. 

c3 


CO 


>o 


CO 


CO lO 


CM 


lO CM 


o o 


■«*< o 


CM © 




r— 


on 


5 


y— 1 


© 


CM 


t^ 




■«*< 


co 


da 


to t~ 


t^ 


00 o 


1-H lO 


00 M< 


»o OO 


o 


»o 


CO 


CO 


© 


H* 


© 




3 


CO 


CO 


CM 


-jt 1-H 


CM 


CM -«J< 


CO CM 


CM CO 


CO "5 


tN 


CM 


CO 


CO 


CO 


1-H 


CO 


CO 




e 
































r- 






rt 






































i-s 




















































































































































so 




H 

•< 
































. 


§ 




w 


































>» 




^ 
































IS 

s 



H 


© 

CM 

1 

E 

CO 

> 

< 






t^ 


op 


T- 


s s 


CM 


CO Tf 


lO CO 


t^ 00 


© © 




CM 


cr> 


iH 


lO 


© 






© 


as 


0B 


o 


o o 


o o 


o o 


© i-H 




















1 


oo 


00 


00 


© © 


SB 


O C35 


OS OS 


© © 


© © 


o» 


c-j 


as 


as 


as 


as 













a 

c 
a 
>-s 

a 

s 

b 



3 
O 
CQ 

a 

bE 






A 



s 


O 


rt 


Ph 






a -3 




d 


S 


8) 





b|! 


>*-. 


c 


+J 




rt 


■— 




s 


d 


to 


o 


^ 




G 


I 




1 


cC 





s 


o 


i-s 


o 

a 


e 

i 

01 


C3 


G 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



151 



« 


© 


co 


CM CO 


CM 


oo 


^ 


© 


OO -# 


-* © 


© 


r^ 


to 


© 


CM CO 


CO 


•* CM © 


© 00 i-H tO 


"c3 


■* 


to 


o © 


■* 


•"• 


1—1 


-* 


l>. l-H 


to © 


i>- 


•* 


© 


© 


to 00 


CM 


n e n 


t-h oo eM co 


o 


tO 


© 


tH to 


,— I 


oo 


3 


© 


CM t~- 


CO © 


CM 


r^ 


© 


CO 


OS T— t 


OO 


os © eo 


CO to t^ © 


** 


■<*• 


■<# 


eo 


CO 


CO -* 


■* •* 


-* 


to 


<* 


to 


rjt •* 


«# 


eo to ■<* 


■^ to eo to 


i 

a . 


-# 


CM 


t>- l>- 


■* 


CO 


CO 


© 


to l>- 


CM t~ 


CO 


© 


>* 


l-H 


00 CO 


CD 


t-h to CM 


H oo oo * 


© 


CO 


00 CO 


CO 


00 


© 


CO 


IO 1H 


t~ © 


oo 


TJH 




CO 


CO l-H 


00 


oo eo i-H 


CM CM t» t~ 




o 


CO 


O CO 


■<* 


CM 


CO 


CM 


CO to 


CM ■* 


CO 


IO 


CO 


to 


CO y-t 


^* 


^ eo cm 


to eo t-h cm 


Q 




































i 

a . 


eo 


eo 


O CM 


oo 


00 


OS 


tO 


l-H tO 


© -* 


t^ 


CM 


© 


© 


© © 


© 


eo eo cm 


© eo oo © 


3> is 


oo 


l>- 


CO o 


CO 


t- 


o 


1— ' 


OO CO 


© © 


© 


CM 


CM 


CM 


O 0O 


CM 


Ttt CO © 


Tj< OS T-H t» 


£J 


■*i 


tO 


»o t~ 


CM 


T-l 


■* 


1— 1 


i-H CM 


CO ■* 


CM 


t^ 


© 


l-H 


eo to 


CM 


eo © co 


CO © CM to 


^ 






































tO 


>* 


CM CM 


1—1 


-* 


to 


r^ 


© oo 


© ■* 


CO 


© 


tO 


T-H 


eo t~ 


h- 


T)l 0O © 


t~ i-H OS CO 


X* 


00 


CM 


»o -* 


oo 


t-~ 


OS 


© 


CO •* 


© CM 


oo 


© 


CM 


to 


00 l-H 


© 


CO CO !>■ 


T|l N O CO 


o 

H-s 
o 


tH 


CM 


00 CO 


o 


CO 


(M 


(M 


tO CM 


to eo 


CM 


*# 


rt< 


© 


eo t-H 


-# 


to © eo 


© © cm eo 


























1—1 






i-i 




O 




































i 

a . 

0> u 


CO 


CM 


CM © 


00 


o 


CM 


M< 


CM to 


eo © 


CM 


© 


© 


© 


oo ■«*< 


«# 


eo © cm 


HIM'ifl CO 


■<* 


CO 


eo cm 


OO 


CO 


CD 


t^ 


tO 00 


T* © 


CO 


to 


© 


© 


eo oo 


t^ 


CO CO l^ 


© © © CO 


8"° 


eo 


TH 


O —I 


*-< 


«-* 


CM 


oo 


i-H © 


i-H esi 


*H 


00 


«# 


© 


CM CM 


«H 


« eq n 


cm cm eo eo 


02 




































09 

3 


CO 


CM 


oo ■* 


l-H 




CD 


r^ 


CO to 


oo © 


CO 


CM 


00 


1-^ 


eo ■«* 


l-H 


eo to © 


t-h t-- eo co 


"5 


t^ 


CO © 


tO 


o 


CO 


© 


t~ CO 




CM 


CM 


l-H 


00 


t- ■*• 


«* 


O H ■»( 


IO i-H rj< CM 


60 

<4 


tO 


»H 


eo co 


CO 


•* 


rH 


T— 1 


© -* 


t~ ■* 


IO 


© 


<* 


CO 


tH ■* 


to 


CM *** CM 


eo co i-i cm 






































t^. 


CO 


iO b- 


CO 


r-~ 


tO 


r~- 


00 t- 


eo t- 


© 




tH 


© 


© eo 


r^ 


CO ■* i-H 


•* OS CM CM 


>> 


to 


T— 1 


© © 


© 


CM 


CO 


t~ 


CO CO 


i* CM 


t- 


«* 


© 


M< 


eo cm 


tO 


CM © to 


hi o cq * 


3 


eo 


© 


CM CM 


CO 


CO 


CM 


>—i 


cm eo 


i-< CO 


CO 


l-H 


00 


CM 


eo th 


CM 


CO tO CM 


to *# eo cm 


i-s 






































rH 


"St 1 


co oo 


© 


M< 


OS 


© 


5 5 


l>- t^ 


tO 


"HH 


© 


CO 


t- CO 


OO 


w n n 


© CO T-H OS 


3 


94 


o 


•* 00 


t^ 


t-h 


CO 


© 


0O -^ 


© 


to 


oo 


© 


t>. t- 


CO 


i-H r» cm 


rjl rt< tO OS 


CO 


CM 


CM CO 


eo 


CM 


to 


,-4 


CM CO 


CM r-i 


CM 


CM 


CM 


CM 


eo cm 


CM 


i-H cm eo 


iji CM CM* CM 


H-S 






































© 


CO 


O CO 


00 


•* 


1— 1 


1^ 


OS *■» 


CO © 


© 


CM 


to 


l-H 


rH 00 


l-H 


•"# CM t~ 


r- cm to cm 




>o 


t^ 


t>. © 


tO 


O0 


to 


© 


l-H -^4 


Tfl O 


l-H 


OO 


© 


CM 


© to 


© 


CM © tO 


eo cm -i^ eo 


CO 


CM 


eo o 


T-H 


l-H 


CO 


to 


■*$* CO 


eo eo 


l-H 


Tj< 


CM 


tO 


CM tO 


© 


i* CM CM 


TjH CO l-H ■"* 




eo 


O 


eo © 


CM 


1—1 


© 


CM 


T(< l-H 


© CM 


f^ 


CO 


l-H 


•*n 


^h eo 


© 


CM tO t~ 


CM CO © CO 


'C 


CM 


CM 


•>* t- 


t^ 


1—1 


© 


00 


00 "<* 


CO CM 


CM 


Tt< 


T* 


© 


© CO 


© 


■«* CM to 


CO CO © to 


a 


eo 


Tfl 


co to 


■* 


CO 


CM 


1—1 


y-i T* 


eo cm 


** 


CM 


CO 


CM 


eo © 


CO 


eo »o i-i 


CM ■»* t-h CM 


<< 




































,£3 


•»* 


CO 


eo ess 


«* 


i—l 


CO 


to 


00 CM 


t^ i-i 


© 


CM 


1^ 


CO 


co co 


r~ 


eo oo t}4 


CO © l-H IO 

co ^ © eo 


o 


t^ 


T* 


eo co 


1— 1 


CO 


t~ 


© 


b- t- 


© CO 


© 


© 


CO 


r^ 


•«*• © 


© 


■^ © CM 


03 


CO 


t>- 


oo ■>*< 


to 


CO 


tO 


CM 


i-H ■* 


l-H CO 


»* 


© 


CM 


t^ 


co ■* 


CO 


i-l CM tO 


eo cm t~ co 


§ 




































4 . 


to 


i—l 


-en t~ 


CD 


00 


to 


tO 


r- -* 


t~ oo 


oo 


OO 


to 






© 


l-H © 00 


i-H OS l-H T* 


T-H 


CM 


t- © 


to 


OS 


CD 


tO 


OO to 


00 CM 


«^ 


CD 


CD 


to 


CM i-H 


CM 


os eo t-h 


OS ^1 OS T-H 


0) o3 


eo 


-# 


O to 


eo 


CO 


■* 


M< 


CO © 


eo © 


rtn 


CO 


l-H 


CO 


to eo 


00 


eo i-H t>. 


CM •* <eH © 


Ph 




































>» 


CM 


CO 


CM CO 


oo 


r^ 


CO 


tO 


l-H OS 


^H © 


© 


to 


t^- 


co 


CM tO 


CM 


OS CO © 


© eo oo © 


i 


*# 


OO 


CM CO 


Tt< 


»o 


to 


© 


00 © 


t- eo 


CM 


»H 


CO 


to 


© CO 


© 


© © eo 


© CO l-H OS 


Pi 

03 


CM 


1-1 


CO to 


CM 


CO 


tO 


tO 


CM tO 


•^ CO 


tO 


<* 


tO 


CM 


t^. to 


CM 


t* ■«*• CM 


■* co ■>*< *eN 




































l-B 




































« 




































<• 




































H 




































>H 






































to 


CO 


t- 00 


© 


o 




CM 


CO ■* 


to CO 


r^ 


00 


© 


© 


i-H CM 


CO 


* IS IB 






t~ 


r^ 


t~ t- 


r~- 


oo 


oo 


of) 


oo oo 


00 oo 


oo 


oo 


oo 


© 


OS OS 


CS 








00 


CO 


00 00 


O0 


oo 


OO 


OO 


00 oo 


oo oo 


oo 


oo 


GO 


CO 


00 00 


CO 


CO 00 OO 


oo oo oo OS 



■3 



152 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



CD 

o 
O 






8 

00 



^3 

c» 

-8 

co 

J- 



"S3 



co 



8 



03 



6 





«-H 


r- 


CO 


03 


t-h 


oo 


CO 


o 


IQ 


S 


r^ 


CM 




i-H 


CO 


CO 


CO 


t>- 




o3 


T-H 


o 


•— i 


oo 


co 


■rf 


CO 




t^ 


co 


t^ 


CO 


t^ 


a-- 


OS 


CM 


CO 




CO 


en 


IQ 


CM 


<M 


"^ 




en 


_H 


"5 


OO 


o 


>* 


r^ 


co 


OS 


CO 


•* 




O 


"5 


-V 


Tf 


■* 


>>* 


■* T 


CO 


■* 


CO 


co 


Tf 


■^i 


co 


•>* 


CO 


t^ 


Tt* 




H 


































oo 








a> 


on 


■«* 


cm 




C35 


t*. 


<m 


IQ 


Q» 


O 


CO 


00 


CO 


as 


CM 


OS 


OO 




CO 


co 


*"* 


SB 


O 


9 


-* 


t_i 


O 


-* 


CO 


^ 


"* 


«* 


O 


CM 


t^ 


OO 




OJ3 


OS 


CO 


PS 


cm 


"# 


-r 


"^ 


CO 


TP 


CM 


CO 


IQ 


CO 


CO 


iri 


00 


o 

CO 


CO 




Q 








































S . 

CD <h 


o 


IQ 


CO 


co 


fr- 


OS 


<M 


oo 


or 


CO 


CM 


«f 


LO 


CO 


OS 


00 


O0 


oo 




o 


rf 


US 


t^ 


o 


CO 


*^ 


Q9 


CO 


— ' 


CO 


CO 


CO 


IQ 


fr- 


CM 


if} 


t^ 






CM 


•—i 


1— t 


_ 


CM 


fM 


CO 


o 


CO 


"*l 


■^ 


CO 


CM 


Ol 


et] 


CM 


CO 


CO 




































i« 






5? 


































r ~ l 






LM 


CM 


<f 


CM 


-f 


•* 


o 


r^ 


>o 


C3 


CO 


02 


IQ 


CO 


o 


IQ 


OS 


1—1 


OS 




-Q 


00 


-* 


t^ 


CO 


u~ 


>* 


r ~ l 


lO 


' —l 


00 


CO 


CO 


IQ 


co 


as 


■«* 


o 


t^ 




o 


CM 


** 


■<*• 


** 


» H 


CO 


«# 


CM 


•" 


^ 


CO 


CM 


to 


^ 


CM 


i-t 


OS 
IO 


eo 




o 








































1 

a . 


O 


<* 


lO 


o 


OO 


o 


CO 


r^ 


«* 


en 


IQ 


CO 


t^- 


a> 


o 


o 


OS 


OS 




CO 


Hi 


!>• 


00 


O0 


CO 


t~ 


e» 


t^ 


-# 


tr- 


t> 


t-~ 


CM 




00 


T-H 


CM 




?" D 


eo 


-* 


T-H 


IQ 


CO 


CO 


00 


o 


Tt< 


CM 


CM 


•"" 


CO 


o 


»-" 


— ' 


O0 


oo 




O 








































0Q 








































•*> 
co 

3 


t— 


o 


r^ 


CO 


o 


eq 


r^ 


«■ 


CO 


(M 


<* 


l-O 


■<* 


CM 


t^ 




o 


lO 




iO 


>* 


CO 


oo 


t^ 


o 


o 


IQ 


oa 


CO 


CTi 


o 


cO 


OO 


00 


o 


OS 


co 




W 


•* 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CM 


CO 


i—i 


■^H 


<M 


CM 


•^ 


CO 


CO 


CO 


IQ 


CM 


,_( 


CO 




3 


































CO 






-*! 












































~+ 


t— 


CO 


r^ 


05 


CO 




aa 


CO 


as 


"* 


o 


«* 


CM 


t- 


IO 


OS 




>> 


t» 


as 


t~ 


as 


•* 


<* 


oo 


t^ 


IQ 


o 


•H 


CM 


CO 


-* 1 


r— ( 


»-• 


OS 


CO 




3 


•O 


CM 


CM 


,_, 


IQ 


to 


pH 


CO 


r- 1 


CM 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


OO 


IQ 


Ttl 


CO 




»-s 


































IO 

1H 








oo 


as 


UO 


o 


O 




OO 


CO 


1—1 


OO 


CO 


CO 


oo 


o 


IQ 


t^ 


CO 


eo 




oi 

3 , 
3 


CO 


oo 


CM 


oo 


o 


a> 


lO 


CO 


oo 


CO 


IQ 


•* 


OS 


CS 


CO 


l^ 


CO 


o 




»—i 


CM 


OS 


cm 


iq 


CO 


CO 


o 


CM 


■*< 


CM 


o 


,-H 


^H 


CO 


■* 


oo 


CO 




•"8 


































CM 

«— 1 








CO 


CO 


CO 


iC 


1— I 


CO 


CO 


1—1 


CO 


a> 


i— ( 


IQ 


r^ 


oo 


"•* 


CO 


CO 


oo 




>> 


CM 


go 


as 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


IQ 


■* 


CM 


o 


IQ 


as 


o 


t^ 


^Ji 


OS 


CM 




at 


t~ 


T-l 


o 


CM 


•H 


IQ 


CO 


IQ 


CM 


i—( 


T-H 


"*< 


CO 


CO 


1-t 


eo 


CO 


eo 






o 


CO 


as 


l«- 


CM 


oo 


^H 


oo 


l«- 


IQ 


1— I 


r^ 


>o 


o 


CO 


OS 


CO 


t^ 




•n 


CO 


*- ' 


en 


OO 


t~ 


GO 


-CH 


OO 


CO 


t^ 


OO 


CO 


CM 


«- 1 


^H 


'-< 


t~ 


IO 




a 


oo 


Tt< 


fM 


OO 


CM 


fM 


CO 


,_ 


■>* 


CM 


C3 


•* 


■>* 


>o 


CM 


■^ 


OS 


eo 




<i 


































■* 






p 


t~ 


<* 


CO 


(M 


>o 


(M 


1— ( 


<M 


CO 


lO 


as 


CO 


m 


r^ 


m 


CO 


oo 


«o 




IQ 


CO 


CO 


t^ 


•H 


CO 


C5 


OO 


OJ 


00 


IQ 


■* 


t^ 


UO 


o 


«—i 


CO 


CO 




a 


CO 


m 


CO 


CM 


CO 


CO 


T-H 


CO 


"* 


o 


CO 


CO 


IQ 


M< 


o 


tH 


CM 


■<** 




§ 








































i 


CM 


on 


to 


O 


a 


CM 


r~ 


CO 


C5 


CO 


r^ 


r- 


CM 


h- 


oo 


y-t 


CO 


eo 




IO 


1-1 


en 


o 


CM 


at 


p« i 


IQ 


t«. 


O 


t^ 


t^ 


00 


O 


m 


OS 


t^ 


* H 




rQ (H 


,-H 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CM 


CM 


CM 


«* 


IQ 


to 


CM 


CM 


CM 


<* 


oo 


lO 


•* 


■^i 




0> eS 


































!>. 






pf. 


































•— c 








CM 


eq 


o 


r^ 


CO 


r~ 


OO 


o 


OO 


a> 


on 


>* 


r^ 


IQ 


1— ( 


CO 


IO 


t>. 




oo 


>o 


00 


oo 


CM 


*& 


CM 


CO 


Oi 


CO 


00 


en 


i— i 


OO 


UO 


lO 


o 


O 






»— i 


cm 


CO 


•* 


IQ 


CM 


CO 


CO 


CO 


IQ 


CM 


CM 


CO 


OO 


CO 


it 


1— 1 


«* 








































1-9 




























































































































































CO 




2 


































. 


i 




w 




































>. 




5* 


































CO 

1 

o 
H 


| 

> 

< 








M 


co 


-+< 


>o 


CO 


r- 


or, 


at 


o 




Ol 


CO 


■f 


iri 


CO 






o 


O 


o 


Q 


o 


O 


o 


O 


o 


1— t 


r— 1 




















OS 


s* 


c-. 


a) 


db 


~. 


A 


en 


A 


crj 


en 


en 


as 


en 


OS 


OS 









A 

ti 

3 


CM 
00 
00 


i 

3 
C 


a 

Q 

>i 

Ih 


o 

E 

O 

CO 

CJ 


S 
o 
u 
S 




03 


9 

■fa 


S 
o 
Jo 


3 
3 


a 




in 


CO 


3 


o 


<l 


*> 




is 


T3 


J3 


co" 


T3 


3 
03 


p 


OO 


3 





u 


'-' 


C3 




CJ 




s 


> 


M 


o 


ti 


a 


,Q 




T3 


hi 


a 


bl 


5 


CO* 


CD 


3 





CO 





a 
a 


a 






i- 


BJ 


>, 


3 


|X( 


Q 


a 









§ 


3 


cu 

> 


-3 
3 


T3 


3 


CO 


03 


C 


a 


-1 


_C 


a 


o 


CJ 


CO 


— 


w 


3 


< 


Eh 








Oi 


-a 




h 


< 


3 


oo 


03 




03 


oo 


-C 




-3 




bO 

a 


crt 


fell 


h 




3 
■*a 

o 
O 

O 


3 
O 
E 
o 

+j 

en 
o 


0) 

a 

CJ 



Q 


a 


4 


ts 


3 


co 

3 


| -» -s 


CO 


CJ 

3 


(1) 
> 


3 
O 


oo 

00 


CO* 


3 


5 


>, 


i— c 
OS 
i-H 










o 

.9 


c3 


3 


£ 

CO 

Jo 


co 


4 


03 


I 




fell 






-a 


3 
p 


3 

3 


Q 


i 


O 


3 





2 

^3 


a 


H-" 

00* 




1 


o 




-S 


o 


w 








T3 


CO 


r^ 


a> 


3 


p 


oo 


+1 


01 


3 




e3 




»-i> 




■J 


.3 




>> 

(H 


13 


to 
3 


a 


3 8 


O 

(H 

o 


c3 

P 


•-s 


0) 


S 


3 
crt 


CO 

I 


C3 
►J 


"= 


A 


_o 




^3 


< 


'a 


> 


bl) 

3 


1 


CO 


3 

i 


O 
E 






a 




• 


o 

.9 


XJ 


h 






1 


1 
"ft 


co 


a 


u 

3 


oo 






pj^ 


i— i 


-3 


j- 


03 
C 

9 
> 
cp 


5 


M 

3 
O 
E 


2 


a 


s 


S 


cu 




CD 




> 


03 


> 


♦a 


co 


O 
'-I3 


CJ 

$ 


3 


_3 


03 

E 


r, 


a 

03 


oo* 

OS 


CJ 
[O 


3 

Hi 


3 




o 




>" 


"S 


3 
o 


a 

03 


C3 


co 

a 

03 


3 
3 


^ 


O 
45 


QJ 


a 


cu 


a 


S 


o 

w 


3 


OS 
CO 

T-H 




3 


CJ 


>l 




J 






c3 


03 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



153 









e 

CO 

O 
r»o 

•c^ 

co 



co 



05 



O 





O 


o 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


C3 


© 


© 


© 




© 


© 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


to 


o 


© 


o 


o 


© 


© 


© 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 
































o 


cm" 


i>r 


o 


© 


CO 


■* 


00 




t^ 


© 


OS 


Tt< 


CO 


co 


en 


CO 


CM 


CO 


© 


CO 


O0 


CM 


© 


t^ 


CO 


"* 


C33 


•* 




*H 




O 


00 


CM 


us 




t^i 


US 


CM 


o 


1^- 


!>- 


© 


CO 




o 


O 


o 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


o 


© 


© 


© 




© 


© 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


IA 


© 


© 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


o 


O 






























CO 


CM 


-* 


t^ 


us 


CM 


«3 




00 


!>- 


CM 


00 


CO 




cn 


CO 


»o 


o 




-# 


■>* 


CO 


CM 


CM 


© 


■* 


1— 1 


CM 


^ 


»H 


CM 


•<* 


© 

CO 


CO 

i-h" 


-* 


US 


CO 


CO 


CM 


co 


^t< 


© 


© 


US 




o 


© 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 




o 


o 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


t)5 


o 


o 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 






























o 


© 


t>- 


oo" 


■«# 


OO" 


<M 


l>. 


iO 


■<* 


t^ 


CO 


© 


US 


CO 


B> 


«o 


CM 


o 


oo 


© 


CO 


C5 


us 


© 


■* 


■<*< 


-* 


<M 




*H 


CO 


© 


© 

CO 


© 

CM 


-* 


t~ 


■*• 


CO 


■* 


co 


CO 


TJH 


© 


■* 




o 


o 


o 


© 


© 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 




o 


o 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


&} 


o 


o 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


e 






























us 


CO 


CO 


00 


© 




M< 


-<*t 


US 


© 


■* 


*# 


U> 


CO 


cn 


CO 


CO 


CM 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CM 


t^ 


t^. 


O0 


CO 


US 


00 


CM 


tH 


CM 


cm" 


eo 


CM_ 

cm" 


»o 


CM* 


CO 


■<* 


CO 


© 


CO 


a> 


CM 


CO 




© 


o 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 




o 


o 


© 


© 


o 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


N 


o 


o 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


o 


© 


o 


O 






























CO 




CM 


© 




© 


CM 


1^ 




© 


US 


00 


CO 




Cn 


i>. 


o 


© 


US 


CO 




© 


© 


•* 


US 


CO 


-* 


"<*< 


t>. 


iH 


CO 


"^1 


CO 


cm" 


© 


-# 


(M 


CM 


CM 


OS 


© 


00 


CM_ 


"* 




© 


© 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


o 


© 


© 




o 


o 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


vH 


© 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


e 






























© 


CO 


O0 


CO 


© 


us 


ts. 


CM 


© 


t^ 


t^ 


•>* 


1^- 


© 


cn 




US 




oo 


CM 


O0 


t- 




CM 


■>* 




CO 


© 


t~ 


l-t 


«o 


CO 


CM 


© 


CM 


© 


■* 


US 


CO 


CO 


US 


CM 

CO 


KO 


US 




o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 




o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


o 


© 


o 


o 

e 


o 


o 


o 


© 


© 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 






























CO 


TiH 


CM 


© 


CM 


O0 


t~ 


J-- 


t~ 


CM 


US 


© 


"* 


r^ 


o> 


© 


«5 


CM 


00 


00 


t^ 




© 


CM 


O0 


t~ 


t-~ 


© 


t^ 


tH 


t^ 


© 


1>- 

co 


»o 


CO 


US 


CM 


r-l 




CM 


oo 


»o 


<M 


CO 




o 


© 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


O 


© 




o 


o 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


o 


© 


© 


© 


cn 


o 


o 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


o 


© 


© 






























cn 


CM 


o 


CO 


CO 


CM 




*tf 


CO 


© 


US 


© 


© 




CM 


CO 


© 


© 


t^ 


I> 


CO 


CO 


US 


CO 


US 


-CM 


CO 


us 


US 




TH 


© 


o 


cm" 


co 
co 


00 


»o 


CO 


CN 


CM 


CM 


•* 


co 


© 


CO 




o 


o 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


o 




o 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


si 


© 


o 


o 


© 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 






























CO 


us 


00 


t>. 


© 


OO 


CO 


us 


© 


© 


© 






CO 


co 


CO 


CO 


OO 


CM 


© 


CM 


CO 


CM 


t^ 


© 


t-- 


CO 


lO 




»H 


us 


CO 


o 


© 


CO 


oo 


CO 


CO 


CO 


>o 




© 


>o 


© 


































1—1 


'-' 


CO 


CM 


r-l 






T-H 




*"* 


cq 


CM 


1-1 


^ 




o 


© 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 




o 


o 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


CO 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


t^ 


o 


o 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


o 


© 


© 


o 


© 


© 






























cn 


CO 




© 


CM 


CO 




CM 


© 


© 


CO 


CO 


us 


CO 


© 


co 


OS 


CO 


CD 


CO 


CO 


OO 


-* 


© 


OO 


■^ 


oo 


t>- 


us 


00 


»H 


t^ 


© 


t^ 


CO 


1— * 


»— f 


"* 


oo 


CO 


CM 


CM 


<M_ 


CM_ 


CO 








CM 


** 


1-1 


•"• 


rt 








i-T 


c<r 


,H 
































m 


3 




























a 
o 

a 


O 


























o5" 


.2 




£ 
















a 


u 


co 




CJ 


bO 

03 

CO 




u 


3 


1 

c3 












CD 

o 
o 

o 


s 


s 

s 


> 


> 




93 


•8 


ft 
< 


8 


c5" 



•"3 


>> 


3 
M 

3 


a 

ca 


o 


<5 


<! 



73 



154 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



^3 

o 






00 

CO 

ft 



CO 
| 

?■» 
8 



8 



^3 

co 



CO 

I 



O 

"8 



o 

-; 



n for 
ears, 
1916. 


o 


© 


o 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


o 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


O 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


©_ 


Meai 
20 Y 
1897- 


t>r 


© 


CM* 


CO 


t>r 


CO 


'* 


■* 


tC 


© 




CM 


CO 


© 


CO 




iO 


(V. 


© 


CO 


■<tl 


CO 


CM 


CO 


CO 


-<*< 


t^ 


CO 


CM 


-*l 


CM 


CM 


- 


!>• 


■«* 


■* 


CO 


•^ 


r^ 




© 


in 




O 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 




o 


© 


© 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


to 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


*-• 






























"5 


to 




© 


t^ 


T*< 


CO 


•* 


•** 


© 




© 


in 


CM 






© 


© 


© 


lO 


CO 


CO 


© 


■<*< 


CM 


CO 




CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


© 


© 


© 


CM 


CM 


T—l 


CO 


•<*< 


CM 


■<* 




'"" , 


•"■' 


i— 1 


CO 


"- 1 


CM 


1-1 












•"* 






o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


o 




© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


U9 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 
































CXI 




CM 


CO 


us 


CO 


CO 


t^ 


CO 


r^ 


CO 


© 


CM 


CO 


CO 


CO 


!>. 


CM 


in 


CM 


CO 


"5 


«5 


CO 


© 


»o 


i*< 


© 


© 


© 


m 


© 


•>* 


CM 


©_ 


CD 


>-i 


CO 


Tj* 


CO 


© 


© 




CM 


*~* 










r " 1 


^ 








1-H 








© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 




© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


«* 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


CO 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 
































© 




t^ 


CO 


© 


t- 


© 




CM 


© 




CM 


•^ 


CO 


© 


CO 


CO 


© 


© 




CM 


CD 




CO 




t>. 


CO 


© 


© 


1— ' 


»-< 


lO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CM 


1 


1—1 


CM 


CO 


© 


CM 






" H 


CO** 


CM 


*"• 








1 














o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 




© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


n 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


O 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


T-l 






























■* 


t^. 


CO 


CO 


CO 


© 


OS 


© 


© 


CO 


© 


>n 


© 


CO 


1-H 


© 


© 


CO 


CO 


CO 




© 




t^ 


CO 


in 


t~ 




■* 


co 


CM_ 


© 


o 


CM 






CM 


© 


© 


© 


oo 


CO 




•"' 




CM 


cm 


1-1 






















© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 




© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


M 


© 


© 


© 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


of 






























© 


t^ 






t^. 


»-H 


«5 


iO 


© 


id 


CM 


CO 




© 


00 


CM 


CO 


CO 


© 


CO 


CO 


CM 


co 


■* 


■«*< 


© 


© 




t>. 


© 


CO 


CM_ 


t^ 


eo 


1— * 


*— * 




i-H 


■<* 


«>. 


CO 


CM 








cm 


CM* 


,H 






















© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 




© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


»H 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


0> 






























CO 


lO 


© 


CO 






t^ 


CO 




CO 


»o 


t^ 


CM 


t>. 


t~ 


CM 


CO 


© 


CD 


»o 


iO 


CO 


CO 




CO 


CO 


CO 


CM 


l> 


CO 


CO 


CO 


■* 


CO 




»— 1 


♦—I 


l>- 


© 


© 


© 


CO 








**• 


*■* 














*"• 


rH 








© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 




© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


o 


© 


© 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


T-t 

o 






























© 


m 


© 


M« 


CO 


•^ 


CM 


© 


"0 


CO 


■<*< 




CO 




Tf 


*f 


-<f 


CO 


© 


CM 


© 


CO 


•** 


© 


W5 


© 


CM 


© 


CO 


CO 


CO 


© 


CD 


CO 




i-H 






CO 


CO 


CO 


CM 




* H 


■"■ 


CM 


* H 
























© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


o 


© 


o 


© 


© 




o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


CO 


© 


© 


© 


o» 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


o 
o> 






























CM 


© 


© 


CM 


CM 


CM 


CO 


CO 


CO 


© 


CO 


l^ 


00 


© 


© 


m 


CM 


CM 




CO 


CO 


© 


© 


© 


© 


eo 




l-~ 


in 


»o 


v* 


"^1 


CM_ 


CO 


CM 


1-H 


CM 




co 


m 


© 


CM 






CM 


cm" 


CM 


'- , 






















© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


o 


© 


© 


8 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 




© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


en 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


o 
en 






























CO 


CO 


CM 


© 


kO 


CO 


© 


CO 


co 


co 


in 


t^ 


t^ 


CO 


CO 


CO 


© 


© 




© 


CM 


■*n 


CO 


o 


CM 


CO 


•<*< 


CO 


^ 


1—1 


r-- 


CM 


CM 


■«*< 


•>* 


CM 


"* 








CO 


CO 


CM 




© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 




© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


O 


© 


© 


© 


© 


CO 


© 


© 


t- 


CO 


© 


© 


© 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


o 






























od 


CM 


t^ 


CO 


m 


CO 


US 


t^ 


© 


CM 


© 




© 


m 


o> 


"5 


© 


© 


CO 


© 


t-- 


CO 


oo 




CO 


t*i 


CO 


CO 


CM 


^H 


"^1 


© 


CO 


"*1 


© 


t» 


CO 




co 


CO 


"3 
CM 


© 


2 


r- 






























W 




























































■+J 






























a 






























o 






























B 






























x 
































W 




























°tn 


H 




























-*j 


S5 




























$ 


O 




























'C 


g 






















u 




bfl 


•a 

aT 




>> 

i 

g 


g 

O 


u 

s- 
cS 


ft 
< 


>> 


a 


>> 

r-9 


bC 
P 
< 


3 

£} 

a 
s 
ft 

0Q 


V 

o 

+-> 
a 

O 


S 
0) 

>• 

o 


(h 

1 

a 

s 

8 

ft 


ei 
E 

o 

> 

< 


a 

E 

0) 

> 

< 

1 






.5 ® 



o a 



i-H © 



P ft 



=3 S 

0) © 



O >h 

■43 0> 

60 n 

s © 

a 2 

c3 



c3 g 



a © 
~§§2 

o .ta "H 






8 ft 



o 



>o 



1» «« -H 

2 © 

ft 2 ^ 

bfi .5 o 

a . e8 

03 4) a, 



0) ^ 



5S ft 

tH -rH ^ 

a g co 

© ^ *^ 



o © 



H.S 



ft 
© 



o © 
« 1-H 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



155 



— ^ 









so 

5 



^5 
<» 

eo 
IV. 

— — 
*© 






00 

6 

- 
- 
- 
< 





o 


O 


© 


© 




© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


o 


© 


© 






a 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 




© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 




us 


a 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


































00 


US 


•«*• 


eo 


US 


© 


© 


CO 


© 




eo 


t» 


■** 








eo 


CO 


us 


r~ 




CO 


<M 


;o 


•>J< 


CO 


CO 


t~ 


t^ 


© 


© 




*H 


CM 


eo 


us 


oc 


CO 


■^ 




CM 




eo 


- 


-* 


© 


CO 






o 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 






© 


o 


© 


© 


o 


© 


© 


=3 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 




J 


© 


© 


©_ 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 




































eo 


us 


CO 


us" 


CO 


© 


eo 


■<*< 


r~ 


»* 


eo 


us 


us 


© 


© 




eo 


~ 


•^ 


oo 


us 


CO 




CO 


lO 


-<*< 


00 


!>. 


CM 


CO 


o 




vH 


© 


00 

co" 


r- 


00 
CO* 


© 


■* 


<M 


CO 








© 


- 


CM 






o 


o 


© 


© 


© 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 






o 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 




CO 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


o 


© 


© 




































eo 

eo 


L~ 


CO 




© 


t^ 


© 


o 






eo 


US 


■<*< 


CO 


US 




CO 


CO 




us 




© 




r~ 


© 


O0 


© 


© 


CO 


^*< 




^ 


CO 


o 


© 


CO 


© 












CM 




US 








© 


o 


© 


© 


© 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 






o 


o 


© 


© 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


o 


© 




CO 


o 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


o 




© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 




































eo 
oo 




CO 


© 


t-- 


co 


© 


SO 


U5 


!>. 


© 


© 


us 


CO 






•* 


o 


CO 


© 


© 


(M 


oo 


»o 


© 


© 


© 




eo 






iH 


eo 


eo 


oo 

CO 


oo 


e«i 


U5 






CO 


CM 


CO 


eo 


oo 


CM 






o 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 






o 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 




<H 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 




































OO 
00 


us 


© 


■* 


© 


US 


00 


© 


00 


t-~ 


eo 


US 


US 


© 


© 






•*J< 


© 


■* 


1© 


CO 


t^ 


"■* 


© 


00 


© 


t-- 


t^. 


CO 






•«*< 


to 


©_ 


us 


© 


CO 


CM 


^H 


1-* 


^H 


CO 


t— 


1© 


CO 






o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


o 


© 






o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


© 


o 


o 


© 


© 


© 


o 


© 


© 




1= 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


o 


© 




188i 
































o 


t~ 


■**< 


© 


■* 


U5 


© 


© 


© 


CM 


us 


US 


O0 


CO 




CO 


00 


r~ 


© 




t^ 


t^ 




00 


© 


© 


t^ 


t^ 


•* 




— * 


t- 


co_ 


1— < 


US 


1"H 


^* 


— * 




i-H 


CO 


^* 


us 


■H 






~ 


1-1 


■"■ 


,H 


























o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 






o 


o 


© 


o 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


o 


© 




en 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


o 


o 


© 


© 


o 


© 




00 

1-1 
































o 




© 


© 


■* 


CO 


t^ 


UJ 






eo 


eo 


-et< 


© 




o 




CO 








U5 


© 


■<*« 


t-» 


o 


© 


OS 


CO 




t^ 


t~ 


CO 


1— 


1—1 


TJ4 




eo 






CM 


■>* 


00 


CM 








•"^ 


eo 


CO 


* H 
























o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 






o 


© 


o 


© 


© 


© 


©1 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 




eo 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 




eo 

1-4 
































o 


us 


t^ 


© 


■*< 


o 


00 


© 




© 


eo 


l>. 


CO 


CM 






© 


© 


CI 


© 


© 


. CM 


t~ 


© 




© 


!>. 


us 


eo 




CO 


T*> 


us 


CO 


CO 


ta 




■<* 




us 


eo 




■<*_ 


US 






































^* 


CO 


eo 


"■* 


*■" ' 












^* 


eo 


*■"' 








© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 






o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 




t» 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


s 


© 


a 


© 


o 


© 


© 


© 




00 

.-1 
































00 


© 


-*< 


■«*< 




r~ 


d 




© 




oo 


© 


■*> 


CM 




us 


•* 




© 


© 


© 


© 


CM 


eo 


CO 




© 




© 




o 


© 


oo 


CO 


CO 


U9 


CM 






eo 


-<*< 


CO 


CM 


us 










































•"J" 


eo 


■"" ' 












*■* 


,— ' 


"■" ' 








o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 






o 


O 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


o 


© 


© 


o 


o 


© 


© 




«o 


o 


© 


© 


© 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


































t- 


CO 


CC 


us 


CM 


00 


cs 


CO 


US 


•<* 


■^ 


oo 


CO 


us 


•f 




eo 


■<*< 


CO 


CO 


© 


CO 


M 


00 


© 


00 


CO 


00 


US 


CO 


00 




T* 


to 


CO 




C0_ 

CO 




CM 




■^ 




CM 


©_ 


T»< 




eo 






o 


© 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 






o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


o 


© 


o 


© 




10 


o 


o 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


o 


o 


© 


© 


© 


































t- 




© 


■*> 


© 


oc 


© 




© 


r-~ 


eo 


CM 


■*J> 


CM 


•<*• 




00 


a 




© 


2 


oo 


r~ 


CI 


© 


© 


■«*« 


© 


OO 


r~ 


r^ 




*^ 




■"L 


••a 


CO 


~* 


00 


CO 


CO 


CO 


© 


eo 


us 


© 


US 
































£ 
































jS 
































43 
































3 
































o 
































s 
































X 
































































X. 




^ 




























■*a 




■z 




























GO 




o 




























*B 




9 


















„ 








o 


"3 

■ 
9 






£ 
















3 
ja 
a 

3 

z. 
o 
QQ 


tT 


3 

JZ 


01 

,2 


e3 
o 


S3 
E 

© 






- 

3 
3 
S3 

•-3 


03 
3 
U 

m 


— * 

3 

S5 






3 


3 


-*2 
01 

3 

< 


o 

2 

o 

o 


Ej 

> 
o 


£ 

o 
B 
m 

Q 


> 
< 


> 
< 





156 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



o 






8 

00 



05 
05 

05 

CO 
© 



^3 

05 

CO 
i- 
05 

I 

?55 



05 



©* 

05 



00 

6 
< 



1 


o 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


o 


© 


o 


. 


o 


o 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


o 


© 


o 


© 


to 


o 


o 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 
































n 


■* 


© 


lO 


■* 


© 


© 


ITS 


t-- 


oo 


Ol 


OS 


l-~ 


© 


•<*< 


00 


00 


t^ 


CO 


© 


CO 


© 


© 


*a 


oo 


© 


iO 


U5 








©_ 


© 

of 


CO 

co" 


""*. 


CO 


CO 






CO 


"3 


CO 


© 


© 


CO 




o 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


o 




o 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


us 


o 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 
































0} 


Tt< 




© 


iO 


CO 


•■* 




o 


OJ 


OS 


t^ 


CM 


CM 


© 


00 


CO 


"* 






CO 


w 


CO 


CM 


O0 


t^ 


t^. 


CO 


lO 


CO 


lH 


o 


iO 


■^1 

CM 


of 


o 




Ol 


Ol 




CO 


of 


t~ 


-" 


■«*< 




© 


o 


© 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 




o 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


** 


© 


© 


CO 


© 


©_ 


©_ 


© 


©_ 


© 


©_ 


©_ 


© 


© 


© 


9k 


CO*" 


|m7 


oo 


© 


© 


of 


,-H* 


© 


© 


^<" 


CO 


© 


© 


© 


00 


OS 


© 


CO 


•* 


-cf 




CD 


© 


»o 


I>1 


CO 


y— * 


t^ 


ut> 




CO 


© 


01_ 

of 


CO 


00 


-* 




Ol 




CO 


oo 


t^ 


t>. 


CO 




o 


o 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


o 


© 


© 


© 


©1 


© 




o 


© 


CO 


© 


© 


CO 


© 


CO 


© 


© 


© 


© 


o 


© 


CO 


o 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 
































CT> 


*# 


CM 


*r> 


kO 


CO 


© 


00 




00 


CM 


© 


CO 


t^ 


1^ 


00 


CO 


-* 


■*# 


CM 


OO 


■^ 


iO 


oo 


o 


Ol 




© 


CO 


CO 


^H 


•<*< 


•o 


CM 

CO 


of 


00 

of 


->*< 








Ol 


CO 


t>. 


© 


CM 




o 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 




o 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


04 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


o 


© 
































00 


o 


CO 


io 




© 


00 


■«*« 


© 


a> 


CO 


!>. 


>o 




!>. 


l> 


^ 


>o 


t-~ 


«o 


Ol 




00 


Ol 


Ol 


OV 


00 


oo 


Ol 


^ 


00 


© 


°l 


co 


01_ 


Tt< 


CM 


Ol 


Ol 




CO 


■* 


!>. 


CO 




o 


CO 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 




o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


o 


© 


© 


© 


▼H 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 
































00 


oo 


• CO 


CO 


t>. 


CO 


CO 


© 


CO 


CO 


© 


»o 


Tt* 


lO 


© 




oo 


tf5 


© 


00 




-* 


© 


© 




© 


"* 




CO 


tH 


© 

CO~ 


■^1 

CO 


-* 
"* 


CO 

of 


lO 


■* 






Ol 


Ol 


CO 


"i 


CO 


CM 




o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 




© 


© 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


o 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


CO 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 
































GO 


■* 


© 


CO 


o 


CO 


oo 


t>. 


Ol 


t— 


Ol 


lO 


CO 


»c 


t^ 


CO 


lO 


CM 


"t< 


t^ 


© 


CO 


© 


CO 


■o 


t^ 




© 


oo 


•«1< 


vH 


Ol 


lO 


CO 


oo 


CO 


»o 






■«* 


Ol 


CM 


© 


CM 


t~ 


































y ~ ' 


, " H 


CO 


l-H 


*"* 










CM 


rH 




'""' 






© 


© 


CO 


© 


© 


© 


© 


o 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 




o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


o 


© 


© 


© 


A 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


o 


© 


© 


o 


© 


CO 


© 


C5 


© 
































00 


CM 


© 


O0 


© 


© 


CO 


■* 


CM 


CO 


© 






CO 


** 


00 


00 


© 


CO 




oo 


lO 


CO 


CO 


Ol 


CO 


Tj< 


-*t 


00 


■* 


^ 


t~ 




CO 


Tt< 


O0 


CO 


© 


-^ 


oo 


Ol 


a> 


Ol 


CO 


© 


































Ol 


I— 1 


'"" , 


""■' 








1—1 




1-1 


1-1 


CM 


1-1 






o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


o 


© 


© 


© 




© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


00 


o 


CO 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 






























8 


CO 


© 


00 


lO 


CM 




t^ 


© 


»o 


Oi 


oo 


CO 


1-^ 


CO 


id 


lO 


CO 


3 


CO 


Ol 




t^. 


iO 


OS 


tO 


-* 


© 


>o 


*H 


o 


© 


CM 


CO 


Tj« 




co 




© 


»• 


© 


CO 


© 


































** 


T ~ l 


CO 


CM 


,_l 








"■"' 


1-1 


CM 


CO 


1—1 






© 


© 


© 




© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 




© 


CO 


© 




© 


© 


© 


o 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


jgm 


o 


CO 


© 




© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 
































8 


of 


© 


00 


© 


© 


CO 


id 


■* 


i-H 


© 


Oi 


CO 


•>*< 


■* 


00 


CM 


CO 


Ol 


© 










OS 


© 


3 


»o 


CO 


*H 


iO 


00 


00 


CO 


© 


■«1< 




CM 


T-l 


y- 1 


co 




CM 


































Ol 


CM 


CM 


CM 


1-1 
















«-H 






o 


CO 


© 


© 


o 


© 


© 


© 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 




o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


o 


© 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


o 


© 


(0 


o 


©_ 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


CO 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


CO 






























8 


l-H 




© 


t^- 


© 


CO 


CO 


■^ 


t^ 


CO 


CO 


© 


t» 


CO 


to 


© 


lO 


■^ 


Ol 


© 




© 




•>* 


t^ 


CM 


OO 


CM 


*H 


^1 


OO 

^5" 


CO 
of 


© 


t~ 


CM 










© 


CO 

»-H 


© 

l-H 


CM 






























of 






























A 






























-1-3 






























d 






























o 






























a 

.a 


w 

55 




























en 

i 


O 




























"C 


a 
























• 


of 


13 
oT 




cj 

3 

§ 

1-9 


>> 














1 


c 


t-T 

3 


2 


If 

E 

o 


a 

E 

OJ 




i 

CD 


o 


ft 

< 


>> 


of 

a 

3 

1-5 




CO 

M 

< 


a 

a 


3 
o 


a 

> 
o 


a 

05 




> 

-< 


> 

< 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



157 



T5 
0) 

fl 
♦ i— i 
-+o 

o 

O 






S 

oo 



05 
^. 
«3 

S« 

S* 

05 

S^ 

CO 

£ 

© 

l"-0 

1 



^3 

05 
-■< 

s- 

05 

555 
ll 

-<3 
5S 

05 



00 

s 

< 





O 


o 


© 


© 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


o 


© 


© 


© 




o 


o 


© 


CO 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


o 


© 


o 


o 


s 


c— 


© 


o 


© 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


e 
i-i 
































■«±l 


00 


t- 


oo 




© 


1* 






oo 


CM 


© 




US 


cm 


us 


© 


oo 


© 




© 


1* 


-<* 


OS 


CO 




t~ 


eo 


«o 


CD 


CO 


oo 


!>. 




1-H 


•o 


t^ 


© 


© 


© 


><* 


















} 
















i-h 




l-H 


l-H 








1 






1—1 


CM 


*"* 






o 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 




o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


o 


o 


o 


© 


o 


© 


© 


o 


CO 


o 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


e 
en 

1-1 






























O0 


1—1 


OS 


© 


© 


t^ 


oo 


© 


© 


l-H 


CO 


OS 


o 




cm 


-* 


© 


■«*< 


«o 


© 


© 


OO 


y-t 


© 


OO 


US 


CD 


■<* 


i—i 


© 


•* 


© 


© 


I>. 


eo 


1-1 




CO 


■* 


© 


00 


CO 


































i— i 


"- 1 


of 


T-l 


l-H 






















o 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


o 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


o 




o 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


us 


CD 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


o 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 
en 






























O 


o 


t>r 


CO 


t^ 


«^ 


t^ 


TH 


CO 


00 


© 


t^- 


US 


CO 


i-l 


CO 


© 


•* 


© 


CO 


t>- 


1—1 


TH 


lO 


r~ 


oo 


OS 


© 


TH 


eo 


""l 


CD 


CNJ 


-=H 


1-H 


1-H 


CM 


l-H 


CM 


00 


J>- 


•u* 




T-l 




of 


*-* 










l-H 














o 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


©, 


© 




© 


o 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


o 


© 


© 


o 


o> 


o 


**< 


© 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 
































o 
o» 

1-1 


t-~ 


CN 


oT 


•* 


>o 


©i 


CM 


© 


t^ 


i—l 


OS 


© 


t— 1 


00 


i^ 


oo 


© 


© 


Th 




CO 


!>. 


© 


©i 


00 


co 


CO 


CM 


■* 


00 


°i 


CM 


l>^ 


tH 




i—l 


eo 


l-H 


CM 


CM 


OS 


CM 








of 


eo 


1^ 






















o 


o 


© 


© 


© 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


o 


© 


© 


eo 




© 


o 


© 


© 


o 


© 


© 


© 


o 


© 


© 


o 


© 


© 


M 


© 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


o 


© 


O 

«n 

i-< 






























© 


© 


tH 


H 


1—1 


t~ 


»o 


r~ 


© 


CN| 


CO 


CM 


© 


00 


eo 


t^ 


us 


CO 


lO 


oo 


•* 


© 


CO 


© 


© 


oo 


OS 


OO 


t^ 


cm 


■"* 


CM 


eo 


OS 


■<* 


CO 


1-H 


■* 


eo 


us 




eo 


































1-H 


oq 


eo 


CM 




1—1 














1-H 






o 


© 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


o 


o 


© 


© 


o 


© 


© 




© 


8 


CD 


o 


o 


© 


© 


© 


o 


© 


© 


© 


o 


© 


CM 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


o 


o 
en 

1-1 






























eo 


•* 


© 


US 


eo 


CO 


CO 


lO 


OO 


CO 


-CH 


OS 


© 




© 


t~ 


© 


oo 


•* 


© 


CO 


eo 


j^- 


o 


rtl 


t-» 


■* 


t-- 


i> 


© 




O0 


r~ 


eo 




l-H 


l-H 


»o 


"* 


t- 




CM 


































1-H 


1-1 


■* 


1-1 
















l-H 


l-H 






o 


O 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


o 


© 


© 


O 


© 


© 


© 




© 


O 


© 


© 


© 


o 


o 


© 


© 


o 


O 


© 


o 


© 


1HT 


o 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


o 


© 


o 
en 

i-i 






























t^ 


o 


US 


■>* 


■* 


eo 


CO 


Th 


l£> 


CM 


-cH 


us 


CM 


US 


eo 


o 


US 


© 


»o 


*s 


© 


CM 


© 


l-H 


t^ 


OS 


-* 


T* 


■<* 


CO 


^- 


CM 


© 


t- 


eo 


■«*• 


eo 


■* 


■* 


CO 


CO 


■* 






































cm 


■* 


CM 














CM 


l-H 






o 


o 


© 


© 


CO 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 




o 


o 


© 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


o 


e 


o 


o 


© 


© 


©' 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


e 
en 

l-H 






























■* 


o 


-# 


© 


CM 


CO 


00 


TtH 


ta 


© 


CO 


CO 


CM 


"*l 


© 


o 


us 


us 








CO 


© 


00 


CD 


© 


oo 


© 


t^ 


O0 


CD 


CO 


CO 


CO 


1 


I 






© 


© 


© 


1-H 
















1 


! 


















eo 


CO 


1-1 


^ 














1-1 


1-1 






o 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


CO 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


o 




CD 


© 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


o 


© 


© 


© 


CO 


© 


en 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


en • 
eo 

1-t 






























00 




us 






CO 


© 


lO 


*# 


us 


-* 


© 


CO 


eo 


' OO 


O0 


© 


CN 




CO 




CO 


© 




© 


CM 


r- 


© 


CM 


CO 


CN_ 


us 


"5 










1-H 


CO 


CM 


© 






«nT 


'-"' 


-# 


c<r 








1 
















o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


CD 


© 


© 


o 


© 




o 


© 


© 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


O 


© 


© 


CO 


o 


© 


© 


© 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


en 

CO 

1H 






























CO 


cm 


Ttt 


© 


CD 


© 




t^ 


OS 


© 


© 


© 


© 


(^ 


00 


<m 


© 


CNI 


T* 


CO 


CO 


o 


CO 


CO 


oo 


OS 


us 


t~ 


CO 


© 


CO 


00 


<M 


iO 


CM 




CO 




OS 


t^ 


•* 


t^ 


































'"" , 


eo 


CM 


1 " H 


'"' 






1—1 




l-H 


1—1 


1-H 


1-H 






o 


© 


© 


© 


o 


© 


© 


© 


g 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 




© 


© 


o 


© 


© 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


t- 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


o 


© 


© 


o 


en 
oo 
i-i 






























us 


t>. 


us 


US 


US 


CM 


oo 




CM 


■**! 


OS 


-* 




-* 


31 


CO 


CO 


l-H 


i—l 


CO 


>o 


© 


O0 


© 


© 


OO 


OS 


CO 


00 


© 


us 


US_ 


© 


© 


CO 


»o 






OS 


US 


© 


US 






l—l 


cm 


•^ 
















*"• 


































CO 






























r« 






























-M 






























a 






























o 






























a 






























X 
































H 




























CO 


s 




























+J 


B 




























CO 

s 


o 
















































t-T 




sS 




a? 

to 


G 




>> 
u 

a 

o3 


>> 

U 
e3 

M 

•s 


o 
H 

03 


"G 


>> 


a? 


13 

»-9 


CO 

a 

< 


OJ 

a 

CD 

a 

CD 


S 
O 

O 


t 

o 
55 


Fh 

o 

a 

o 
o 

Q 


03 
N 
OJ 
> 

< 


03 
E 

OJ 

> 
< 



158 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



T3 

o 
O 



CO 

Ob 






CO 

© 
3 



"t5 
«o 

to 

i 



*s2 






00 

6 

w 

< 
Eh 





o 
o 


o 
o 


o 

8 


g 


o 


8 


8 


o 
o 


© 
o 


8 


8 


8 


© 


8 


S52 


© 


© 






o 


o 


o 


o 


© 


© 






© 
































© 


CO 






•«!»< 


US 


•<*< 


"3" 


CO 




us 


© 


us 


*nT 


OS 


t>- 


»— 1 


o 


co 


oo 


00 


f* 




CO 


lO 


oo 


r» 


0) t- 


»-t 


co 


t^ 


© 


o 


■* 


1—1 


CM 


CM 


■^ 


t^ 


OS 


OS 


co 


*e! CO 00 


i-h 


l-H 


cm 


cm 






















to 


o 

8 


1 


o 

8 


1 


1 


I 


1 


8 

o 


o 

8 


1 


8 

© 


© 
© 
© 


© 
© 

© 


© 

© 

© 


































cm 


CO 


o 


t^ 


OS 


oo 


»o 


00 


CO 


"? 


© 


us 


■«* 


© 


■** 


lO 


cm 


CO 


CO 


OS 


oo 


t~ 


CM 


] 






© 


O0 




© 


CO 

1— 1 


oo 


© 

CO 


•* 


1—1 


"5 






1 




CO 


© 


tH 




o 




© 


o 


o 


o 


o 


8 

o 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


in 


o 
© 


§ 


o 
o 


o 
o 


o 
o 


o 
o 


o 

o 


8 


© 

© 


8. 


1 


o 
© 


8 
































^■i 


© 


o 


oo 


o 


\rs 




"5 


oo 


00 




1-H 


oo 


OS 


© 


0J 


cm 


t>. 


OS 


OS 


»o 


o 


■«*l 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CD 


OS 


1— 1 


O0 




CO 


00 


US 


"5 


(M 


«-H 


o 


1-* 




CM 


CM 


oo 


t* 


tH 




O 


o 


© 


© 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


© 




8 


© 


8 




o 


o 


o 


8 


o 


8 


o 


8. 


o 


© 




© 


■w 


o 


© 


o 


o 


o 


o 


© 




© 


© 


© 
































*-f 


00 


© 


OS 


CO 


o 


US 


J--T 


CD 


us 


© 


1^ 


© 


CM 


OS 


C?> 


© 


o 


CM 


US 


ITS 




o 


us 


CO 


US 


© 


US 


t^ 


CM 


^ 


© 


© 


© 
co 


CO 






rt 




1-1 

1 


1 




CM 


t* 






s 

o 


8 

© 


o 




o 


o 


o 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


o 


© 


00 


o 
o 


g 


8 


8 


8 


o 
o 


8 


© 
© 


© 

© 


© 

o 


© 
© 


© 
© 


































»— 1 


"* 


o 


CNI 


t^ 


OS 


<M 


Tt< 


oo 


tf 


© 


CM 


CO 


© 


** 


"5 


OS 


CO 


CO 


•* 


CO 


*9 


oo 


oo 


OO 


CO 


CO 


oo 


© 


t^. 


© 


c^ 


oo 


y-l 


] 






■* 


■"* 


» 


"-*- 


1— 1 




1— 1 




cm 


cJ 






1 


1 
















o 


o 


o 




o 


o 


o 




© 


© 


8 


© 




© 




o 


o 


o 




o 


o 


o 




8 


© 


8 




© 


3 

en 


© 


© 


© 




o 


o 


o 




© 


© 


© 


© 






























00 


t>r 


CM 


\n 


tc 


oo 


t>r 


OS 


O0 


•>* 


US 


><i5" 


OS 


CO 


<M 


OS 


OS 


CO 


t** 


•<*< 


t"» 


CM 


«? 


«-H 


CO 


OS 


tN. 


CM 




t>- 


1-H 

1—t 


© 
co" 






»-t 


I 


1 


1 


1 


»— 1 


Tt< 


t>» 






o 


o 


© 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 




o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


8 


© 


o 


© 


o 


© 


© 


■^ 


o 


o 


© 


o 


o 


o 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


































© 


o 


■t* 


CO 


O0 


CO 


■*" 


o 


CD 


CO 


CO 


oo 


"*< 






o 


■* 


<M 


l-\ 




1— 1 


CM 


t* 


OS 


© 


© 


r-t 


US 


us 


t~ 


1— I 


■^1 


CO 


IM 


1 






CM 


»o 


© 


US 


»-H 








l-H 


rt 






1 


















o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 




o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


© 


o 


© 


o 


© 


© 


e 


© 


© 


© 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


.H 


© 


o> 


** 


IC 


t^r 


CO 


c<f 


CO 


us 


i— r 


CO 


t-T 


© 


os" 


©> 


© 


■<& 


US 


CO 


t^. 




o 


t^ 




US 


t>. 


CM 


!>• 


CM 


»H 


T* 


oo 


l-H 


CD 


CN 


US 


1-H 

1 


1 




1 




CM 


us 






o 


© 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 




o 


© 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


o> 


© 


© 


o 


o 


o 


o 


<= 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


o 


c<r 


CO 


■* 


^-T 


s 


OS" 


^-T 


US 


oT 


1-H 


CM* 


CO 


US 


$" 


en 


© 


00 


CO 


(M 


CO 


CM 


T 


"* 


"0 


oo 


CO 


<M 


^ 


CO 


°i 


t>^ 


!>;_ 


o 


(N 


1 




1 




CM 


CO 








cm 


T " H 


""* 


, ~ > 




1 


















© 


o 


o 


o 


o 


Q 


o 


o 


© 


© 


8 


© 


© 


© 




o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


8 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


oo 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 
































o 


us 


CO 


t>. 


t» 


CO 


•<*< 


-* 


CM 


CM 


t~ 




CD 


■^ 


"* 


o 


CM 


CO 


us 




-<tl 


OS 


»-H 


o 


oo 


"<J« 


t~ 


CO 


OS 


-<*< 


»H 


OS 


US 


CM 
CM 


*-H 


o 

1— 1 




1 


l-t 


1 








© 
































tn 






























A 






























+s 






























a 






























o 

a 


o 




























.2 


S 


























oT 


in 
-*> 

CD 

0) 

i 




i 

a 

0] 


>> 

u 

c 

•s 


u 
E 

S3 




S3 


a 

3 


•-9 


-t-i" 
03 

3 
bO 

3 

< 


i 

a 

a 


I 

o 

-t-> 
o 

o 


a 

> 
o 


a 

s 

§ 

Q 


E 
cy 

> 

< 


B 

si 
E 
B 

> 

< 






>>.£: 



os >s a 



n 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



159 



CO 

*eO 



•to 

« CO 
HO m 



«o 


3 


*eo 


a 


HO 


T) 


CO 




-«■» 


a> 


to 


> 


C 


o 


no 


rQ 


*Ci 


03 



"*0 ^. 



J 553 



«o 



05 

6 

PQ 







i 

a«S 


o3 0) 

<4H -U> 


© 


© 


IC 


© 
CO 


© 


© 
eo 


CM 


us 

© 


© 
CM 


© 


© 


CM 

C35 


00 




-, = -' 


Tf« 


US 


© 


»o 


Oi 


US 


eo 


CN 


»—i 


»— i 


»— i 


CM 


us 


































o3 © S 


© 


© 


•* 


CO 


oo 


© 


t-~ 


CO 


CO 


© 


»* 


© 


eo 




•**• 


eo 


t^ 


OS 


CM 


■* 


eo 


o 


© 


U5 


US 


CM 


OS 




eo 


© 


eo 


© 


© 


»o 


© 


»o 


us 


CM 


us 


00 


»o 




■ H * O 

^ a 


CM 


eo 


eo 


"3 


eo 


eo 


«-• 


o 


© 


© 


o 


o 


CM 




«8«. 






























|? 


O 


OO 


<M 


»o 


•* 


^ 


CO 


CM 




CM 


»« 




eo 




CO 


© 


eo 


CO 


eo 


u» 


CO 


t^. 


CM 


■«*< 


1-1 


oo 


** 1 






1H 


US 


eo 


eo 


eo 


CO 


US 


i— i 


■* 


•^ 


CO 


CM 


eo ' 




«e 
































2 T) 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


1 © 








o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


o 


© 


o 


©' 


o 






© 


© 


© 


© 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 




































00 


© 


© 


t~ 


CO 


© 


© 




co 


CO 


© 


00 


us 






O *-" 


CO 


© 


CM 


•* 


•— ( 


us 


© 


00 


-* 


CM 


CM 


^ 


eo 






*3 © 

03 -^ 




CO 


00 




t~ 


us 


1— < 


oo 


© 


CM 


© 


© 


CM 




































■£ «3 


ec 


I-- 


Ui 


© 


Tt< 


eo 


00 


© 




»o 


■* 


© 


cm" 






s £ 


■^ 


© 


© 


US 


00 


CN 


1-* 


eo 


eo 




eo 


US 


co 






l-H 


tH 


CM 


eo 


y ~ ' 


CM 


,— ' 












1—* 










1 


1 


© 


1 


1 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


1 © 














© 






o 


© 


o 


o 


© 


o 


o 


© 














© 






© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 










































BQ 






© 






© 


US 


">* 


© 


•** 


© 


us 


■* 








3 






© 






<M 


""Tl 


oo 


-* 


t^ 


!>• 


^ 


co 






C4 






© 






OS_ 


CO 


•* 


© 


^ 


© 


eo 


t^ 






H 

O 

< 
« 








cnT 






<M~ 




eo 


i>T 


© 


© 


tjT 


■<* 












eo 










t^ 


oo 


oo 


t- 


■* 


i—i 






































































o 


































H 




© 


© 


1 


© 


© 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 I 






CO 


a* 


o 
© 


© 
© 




© 
o 


o 
© 
























cm 


us 




© 


























*S 


US 


»o 






eo 
























o 


© 


00 




°i 


e» 
























eo 






© 


^H 


























t>- 


oo 




CO 


»-H 




















{H* 


































































































« 


,£3 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


1 o 




©„£5+3 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 




w 




© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 




ft 


cm" 


wT 


•^T 


© 


c> 


© 


© 


© 


eo 


© 


eo 


© 


t>r 






US 


"5 


oo 


©. 


© 


© 


© 


o 


t»- 


eo 


o 


C3> 


CO 




CO 


©Ja ©Q 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


00 


© 




O 


CQt3^q 






























J 


-*> 






























J 
































•< 
O 
































"S a 
i £ ©Q 

cqhh © 
03 rs 
b» © 


o 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


1 o 






© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


o 


o 


© 


© 


o 


© 






o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


o 


© 


© 


o 


© 






































eo 


CM 


t~ 


CM 


eo 


© 


00 


eo 


T»T 


© 


© 


oo 






t^ 


OO 


■* 


T-H 


eo 


o 


oo 


•<* 


t~ 


t* 




© 


1-1 






*-H 


CO 


a 


oo 


*i 


CM_ 


'-J, 


""l 


t>^ 


'-J, 


eo 


oo 


t^_ 






CO 


e<T 


© 


oT 


CM* 


»o 


r^ 


eo 


CO 


■* 


•"* 


eo 


us 










o> 


eo 


CM 


us 


eo 












US 












CM 


1—1 




















T3 -u ■ 

(i o 22 ^ 
o3.2 3t3 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


o 


© 


© 


© 


1 © 






o 


© 


o 


© 


<S 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 






© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


o . 






© 


© 


CO 


eo 


© 


r-T 


tC 


"5 


© 


i^T 


»T 


eo 


00 






.3 &M © 


© 


t- 


CM 


CN 




00 


C33 


CO 


<M 


OO 


»>. 




CM 






!>•_ 


>* 


© 


^ 


»o 


IO 


eo 


us_ 


t^ 


CM_ 


eo 


CO 


co 






2 wo* 


us 


us 


oT 


eo 


© 




oT 




T)T 


crT 


© 


C35 - 


CM 






Q £«! 


t~ 


eo 


CO 


© 


CO 


© 


OO 


© 


l-H 


a> 


© 


oo 


© 






T3 >>jgT3 

©.•a « © 


o 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


1 


1 


1 


1 o 






© 


o 


© 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 








o 






© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 








© 






t>r 


eo 


CO 


eo 


tc 


© 


cm" 


00 


CO 








■>* 








© 


© 


CM 


© 


O0 


CM 


•* 


s 


00 














CO 
© 


eo 


eo 






CO 

i— t 


CO 


rh 








© 

CM 






TH 


CM 


CM 


eo 




CM 
















































w 


























of 




fre 






























2 


























>> 




O 


























u 










03 
1 


u 

03 
3 
u 

•s 


^3* 
o 
u 

03 


<5 


03 


© 
§ 

3 

»-3 


> 

>-s 


GO 

3 
bO 
3 


© 

a 
© 

a 
© 

GO 


© 

O 
o 
O 


© 

a 
© 
> 

o 


© 

a 

i 


© 

-• of 

$ 1 

O > 



tn 



°-§ 

a o 

Q, CQ 

3 £ 

CO 

© 53 

5 a 



3 nd 

t3 a 
© o 

03 .2 

a -g 

> 



o3 u 

-v s 

© £ 

CO © 

a os 

"3 3 

© © 

g 

S 3 

^ CO 

bfl © 

.3 "S 

S bfl 

3 2 

1 8 

►3 < 



160 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 





OS 




3 




C 




m 


<^ 


cm 


>~( 


m 


Ob 


II 

© 


>-i 


JS 


> 


•<o 





05 o 



TS 


_ 


<s 


ao 


« 




<» 


g 


"ft. 


o 


c 


M 


s- 




o 


-c 


■« 


s 


*2 


rt 


?«r 


10 


<i> 




-»~ 




c 


S 


fe 


ffi 




crt 


*♦-, 


3 


o 


cr 



co °o 

"<^ p-rj 
CO 3 



6q S 



s 




<4> 


H 


H-i 




co 


© 


?S5 


a 
3 


CQ 




rV 


Si 


en 


I 


$ 


iO 


r-^ 



OQ 



O oo 



fc 



H "5 

pq ^ 

^ S 

H p 





BOB 


1 

S 


00 


CM 

00 


00 


1—1 


OS 


CO 


CM 




OS 

CO 


10 

CM 


CO 




CO 
00 




CO 




oi'S -u 





CO 


r~ 


CM 


t^ 


•* 


CM 












•^< 






















1 










isJJ 





CNI 


»o 


CO 


t^ 


00 


•>*< 


C3 


T»« 


e» 


OS 


CM 


"* 




00 


CO 


-^ 


•>*< 


CO 


CO 


Tt< 


CO 


•* 





00 


CD 


CO 




CO 


<M 


CM 


<N 


id 








i-H 








»"• 


»o 


, 




™— 


*"' 


<M 


CO 


»o 


<M 


CM 


-* 








T 








OS ' 
1— 1 




N — ' 






























3 — < © 


CO 


,_ 


CO 


Ci 


CO 


t^ 


s. 


_ 





OS 


00 


CM 


CO 




10 


OS 


'- , 


1—1 


•>* 


t--. 


1—1 





00 


■<* 


CM 


CM 


OS 




C6 ra w 
« 5 


tH 


»o 


■^ 


■* 


CO 


■«* 


»o 


CM 


T-H 


— H 


CM 


eo 


OS 




























co 




**"' 
































O 



































1 




^3. 1 


O 




















CO 


CO 


CO 













-nOi . 


O 














o_ 








o_ 


o_ 













lass 


N 


evf 


CJ^ 


t^r 


•* 


CO 


CO 


00" 





•>* 


CO 


■<t" 


CD 




IO 


CO 


CM 


CO 


05 


CO 


CM 


10 


s 


OS 


1*1 


00 


cs 




OO 


a> 


00 


CO 










00 


"p 


CM 


CO 


OS 






















t 










O 




CO 


00 


00 





■«*< 


"O 






00 


CO 


t-- 




t^ 





CO 


CM 





Oi 


■* 










CM 


CO 








1-1 


,H 


CM 


*"* 
























O 





1 


1 





1 


1 





1 











1 1 








O 






































O 




































03 
































CO 


os 


CO 






K5 






CM 




CO 


CO 


t>r 








O 




OS 






10 






■* 




CO 


00 


00 










02 


C3> 






CO 






t^ 




OS 


CO 








H 


HH 
































co 


OS 

















CM 


«o 


■* 






O 


























1— ( 






<! 
































« 
O 


































1 


1 





O 


1 








1 





1 


1 


1 


1 




H 











O 


























m 


a 









O 



































































CO 




t— 


Tt< 




t- 








CO 






"c3 






o> 


CM 




CO 


00 




CM 








10 






O 






CO 


CO 




Oi 


CM 




10 








CM 








































CO 


CO 




N 


CM 




Tt< 








00 












00 


t^ 






















"* 2 >H-1 





O 





O 


























1 







O 





O 


































O 





O 































of 


t>T 





O 


t>r 





,_r 


1—4 





CO 


CO 












<M 






00 


00 


t- 


00 





co 


m 





r» 




00 


O 


'* 


oi~ 


CO 
CO 






CO 





CO 


CO 


CO 


t>. 


CO 




c3.!-. 


■* 


tC> 




•<* 


t>- 


J>. 


CM 










CM 


»o 




£tf 




1—1 


T ~ ' 


T ~ l 




















(w 
































1 St3 cq 





O 





O 


























1 


la P © fcj 





O 





O 


c> 




























"3 C <a a> 





O 


©_ 


o_ 





























a 


^£ & cj 


cnT 


»o 


10 


"*" 


eji" 





l-O 


CO 


CO 


CM 


t>r 


T»~ 


in 


w 




m 


-<tl 


»o 




■* 





10 





CM 


Tj< 


CO 


t^ 


CO 


OS 
O 


- 


CO 


CO 






CN 


05 

l"H 


CO 


CM 


t- 


»>. 


t^ 


t>. 


CO 


>-3 






























1 






























^fl^ . 











O 


























1 











O 































SlgJ 











o_ 














CO 





CO 










cnT 


»o 


CD 


TjT 


^ 


t>r 


OS" 


00 


CO 


i>r 


t>r 


i>r 


m" 




© ^ -..P 


CO 


>o 


CO 


OS 


CO 


CO 




CO 


»-H 


t^ 


»o 


cs 


CD 




00 


as 


00 


t^ 


00 


00 


o> 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 
































*£* 




























13 .» 






































1 




a)fj ho 
^ ^ j-t y) ^ 





























































o_ 

























t>T 


cnT 


CO 


t~-T 


CO 


00* 




co 


cjT 







0* 




<M 





■>* 





00 


00 


»o 


00 


•* 


CO 


CM 


CD 


OS 




*i. 


CO 


CO 


00 




1—1 


CO 


CO 


CO 


"i 


CO 


CO 


CO 




t>r 




oT 


CO 


t*r 


I--T 


■*i~ 


CM 


CO 


TJ~ 


,_" 


CD 


cm" 




.X; +j z, 


CO 


*es 


U5 


tH 


>o 


»o 


ta 


>o 


"3 


»o 


V} 


"5 


m 




13 . -J 






































1 




Of- >>o 











































-2 £ 3 £-o 

15 w^ 3 C 





























CO 









































>o 




«o 











00 


in 


(^ 


CD 


CO 










■^ 


<M 


CO 


t^ 





00 


CO 


■^ 


00 


CM 


CM 





CD 






CO 


"5 
CO 




CO 


0^ 


cm" 





CM 



10 


CO 

CO 


00 
CO 


CO 

00" 


CD 


CO 






l*^ 


CO 


10 


tK 


tj< 


■* 


•«J* 


>o 


»o 


to 


*a 


■>* 


■<*< 


«o 




■4-> ■ 





O 
































1 




sis §1 





O 




















CO 



















o_ 


o_ 








o_ 


o_ 





CO 


CO 





o_ 







t>r 


O 


a* 


t>r 


UTi 


^5" 


CM 


00" 


CO 


CO 


i>r 




* "5 




sTPl 1 


a> 


O 


CO 


><** 


CO 




CO 


^ 


10 






CO 


Tj< 




»o 


CO 


00 


e» 


CO 


■^1 


CM 


CM 


10 




>o 


■* 






»o 


"5 


00 


CM 


oT 




o~ 


^H* 


■*)" 


oT 





oT 


CM 




E S« 


t^ 


CO 


CO 


C3i 


CO 


o> 


00 







OS 





00 











"■* 










I-H 


TH 




1—1 




1—1 






























03 





bj 

































>> 

u 
03 

a 

03 


U 

c3 

3 



G 

cl 


< 


>> 

03 


3 

3 




-tJ 
en 

3 
hO 

3 

<1 


© 

a 

© 
© 


© 


-t5 






© 

a 
1 




© 

a 

© 


© 

p 


a -s 



M 

3 
O 

i-H 

o 



3 

Q 

3 



S 

o 

s- 

3 

i 

E 
>. 

d 

-a 



3 



.3 H 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



161 






53 

C3 
<» 

C55 



.«3 " 



co 


1—1 


«o 


II 


•^> 


0> 


CO 


r^ 


•c-a 


<s 



CQ 



co 



53 

•«> 
•<s> 

(3 



o 

H 

m 



13 



03 





• 1— 1— J 






























Percent 

age of 

Rainfal 

collectec 


o 

© 


© 

o 


i-H 
CO 


CM 

1-H 


CM 


0O 
CO 




00 


i-H 
00 


eo 


oo 

o 


© 


© 
1 © 




CN 


»o 


oo 




© 


«* 


eo 


<M 






1-H 


i—i 


i« 










1-H 






















J3T5.-A 






























o3 © 2? 


—H 


oo 


oo 


oo 


CM 


>o 


"3 


oo 


o 


<M 


T*< 


© 


i-H 




«"-e 2 


© 


00 


© 


"5 


OS 


"5 


■* 


eo 






CM 


»o 


© 




.S 33 © 






























1-H 


<M 


eo 


■* 


CM 


CM 


i-l 


o 


o 


O 


© 


o 


i-H 




o33l (3 


























CM 




tf 8tt 






























13*5? 


<M 


CO 


CM 


C<l 


o 


m 


© 


US 


© 


oo 


oo 


oo 


"5 




.s-g 


«o 


CO 


CO 


1-H 


e*i 


-*< 


00 


t~ 


eo 


CM 


TH 


1-H 


i - 1 




i-H 


U3 


•* 


■<* 


eo 


»o 


eo 


i-H 


i-i 


i-H 


CM 


eo 


00 ' 




=5 a 


























eo 




Ph& 






























2 -d 


O 


o 


o 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


1 © 




_© © 


o 


o 


o 


CO 


o 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


o 


© 






o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 
































t-~ 


oo 


t- 


eo 


TM 


© 




oo 


© 


1-H 


eo 


© 


C5 




-h O ?! 


t~ 


TJH 


oo 


"3 


t>. 


OO 


© 


© 


t-- 


t~ 


© 


© 


eo 




^3 © 


00 


CO 




CO 


t>. 


© 


es» 


t^ 


© 




T* 


oo 


© 
































"S e8 


oo 


© 


© 


CO 


oo 


"5 


tH 


eo 




1-H 


o* 


•* 


oo 




H * 


1-H 


eo 


eo 


** 


CM 


(M 


i-H 




















O 


o 




o 


© 


© 


1 


l 






1 




1 1 








o 


o 




o 


o 


© 






















© 


o 




o 


o 


© 




















































oa 


© 


»« 




t>. 


o 


© 




















o 


(M 


T* 




o 




»o 




















hh 


>o 


o» 




""i 


** 


1-H 


















h 




•* 


cm" 




CO 


us 





















































«! 
















i» 
















K 




























































O 
































H 




1 


l 


© 


1 


1 


1 


© 


© 


© 


© 


o 


© 


1 © 




so 








© 








© 


© 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 












o , 








© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 






^a 


































oo 








i>T 


ci" 


© 


oo 


© 


© 


•* • 




"cl 






CO 








l>- 


-* 


to 


CO 


© 


CM 


ta 


n 




O 






CO 








t- 


© 


** 


CO 


OS 


">* 


r ~ l 










t>r 








CnT 


eo 








■* 




« 
































H 
































Ph 
03 






























































O 


+J.-4H 


o 


o 


o 


o 


© 


© 


© 


1 


1 


1 


l 


1 


o 


b ■• -• 


o 


o 


o 


© 


o 


o 


© 












© 


J 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 












o 


5 


Wate 
wasted 
Outlet 

Lake 


1-H 


CO 


eo 


© 


oo 


i>r 


,_? 












© 


tO 


I-~ 


© 


t» 


•* 


o» 


t^ 












eo 


o 




© 


us 

OS 


© 


CM 


CO 


© 












co 




<M 


CO 


CM 


*a 


eo 


CM 






/ 








1-H 




i 9t5 cq 


o 


© 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


1 © 




aoo)!s 


o 


o 


o 


CO 


© 


© 


© 


o 


© 


© 


© 


o 


© 




T3 ^ rt © 


o 


o 


o 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 




Water 

verted f 

Waters] 

by Sew 

etc. 






























<N 


t^ 


CO 


© 


CO 


eo 


eo 


© 


© 


eo 


eo 


•** 


US ■ 




to 




<M 


© 


eo 


eo 




(M 


CN| 


© 


© 


CO 


*o 






eo 


e» 


■* 


i-- 


""*! 


© 


t» 


CO 


"3 


»o 


•>* 






,H 


i-i 


T-H 


cnT 


1 ^ 


*" H 


1-H 












1— 1 - 

c 


*$*£* 


1 


1 


, 


, 


1 


, 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


I 1 




. 8,-3 cS © 






























-IS 5 3-PT3 






























Wa 

dischi 

thro 

Cochi 

Aque 
















• 














w 






























H 






























g 






























O 






























3 


























© 






























O 

1*4 

© 








03 
§ 
1 


1 
a 

u 
© 


,3 
© 

I 


=3 

< 


5 

a 


© 




< 


© 

.ft 

a 
© 

© 

CO 


© 
.ft 

O 
-t-> 
u 

O 


© 
.a 

8 
| 

o 

55 


©" 

a 
© 
© 
© 


Total, 
Averag 



T3 

a 
o 
a 

bO 
Q 

o3 



bO 

3 



162 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



CO ? 

_?£ 

— o 
- o 



£ >> 



Sg 






OS CO »-i OO CM 



OS CM r-« 



-H <M •* 



CO 



535 

•<s> 

CJ5 



co 

cq 

"co 

o 

oq 

<» 
ss 

o 

«0 

•<s> 
O 

CO 
Cii 

as 



CO 

CO 
CO 

■& 

<o 



a.ti >>, 



sS; 



.t: <a 



O.Sfll 



s > 

o CD 



CO i~ O 



>>-3 

- o 
3 > 



~ Sos 
f-^pqcM 



■<*< 


!>. 


■* 


CM 


US 


oo 


T* 


^ 


CD 


t~ 


CO 


"* 


t» 


CM 


CM 




■* 


OS 


OS 


o 


o 


OS 


t~ 


CO 


1— t 


o 


■«* 


■>* 


CO 


CO 


rt< 


•* 


us 


US 


■>* 


■<*< 


■<* 


•* 


Tt< 


o 


O 


o 


o 


O 


o 


o 


o 


O 


o 


o 


o 


o 


CO 


CO 


co 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO • 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


1—1 


IM 


OS 


us 


OS 


o 


»o 


<M 


"*< 


o 


OS 


lO 


OS 


co 


"3 


o 


us 


c© 


00 


CM 


oo 


t^ 


o 


■* 



CM CN CM CM CM CN 






o 

co cp 



X-Ocp 

CO »4 CM 
« %US 



CM 1-1 1-H 



CM CM CM CM CM <M 



«5 lO «5 lO 
CM CM CM CM 










^1-rtCM 
Jl3 c3 t>: 



J3-T3CM' 
co J; co 
_55 cj oi 



OO 


CM 

CO 


CO 


CO 
CO 


CO 
CO 


CO 
1^ 


CO 
CO 


CM 


i— i 






o 

CO 


o 

CO 


CS 


o 

OS 


1-H 


o 


CO 

CM 


-cH 

oo 


us 


CO 


OS 
CO 


1^ 

CM 


us 

CO 


oo 

00 


o 



."5S 






C0^ 



M II 



5 


O 
OO 




CO 
CO 


CO 


CO 


00 


oo 


us 


OS 


CO 


oo 




CM 

CO 


CM 

CO 


CM 

o 


CM 

CO 


CM 

CO 


CM 

CO 


CM 

CO 


CM 

CO 


<M 

CD 


CM 

CO 


CM 

CO 


CM 

CD 


05 

CO 






i— I 

6 

H 

H 



S'2 

o3 O 



CM OS 00 i-i 



O 

o 



n 



t>. 


r- 


O0 


oo 


00 


oo 


00 


00 


oo 


r* 


t^ 


t^ 


t^ 


US 


»o 


US 


US 


us 


»« 


lO 


"5 


>o 


us 


US 


US 


"3 


CO 


us 




oo 


** 


o 


00 


CO 


CM 


os 


oo 


US 




OS 


CM 


OS 


OS 


^-H 


us 


T)< 


CO 




*-l 


CM 


US 


CM 


CM 


CM 


_ 1 


CM 


9 


^H 


^_ 


_l 


CM 


CM 


CM 


CM 


CO 


•<*< 


■^ 


•^ 


■* 


-*l 


TfH 


■«»< 


'S* 


rt< 


Tfl 


">*< 


•* 



hi 






CO CO CO CO 



W 
-< 



d 



ft 



c« 



a 



3 



< 



O 0) 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



163 



Table No. 13. — Sources from which and Periods during which Water has been 

drawn for the Supply of the Metropolitan Water District. 

From Wachusett Reservoir into the Wachusett Aqueduct. 



January, 
February, 
March, . 
April, 
May, 
June, 
July, 
August, . 
September, 
October, 
November, 
December, 
Totals, 



Month. 



Number of 

Days during 

which 

Water was 

flowing. 



27 
27 
29 
25 
26 
27 
29 
27 
26 
28 
25 
25 



321 



Actual Time. 



Hours. 



270 
440 
466 
286 
239 
321 
392 
414 
384 
434 
274 
262 



4,186 



Minutes. 



25 
30 
10 
41 
10 
16 
35 



43 
22 
41 



41 



Million 
Gallons 
drawn. 



2,349.5 
3,928.9 
5,239.8 
2,793.7 
2,154.8 
2,747.6 
2,771.3 
3,144.8 
3,441.6 
3,077.9 
3,020.3 
2,778.0 



37,448.2 



Total actual time, 174.45 days. 

Total quantity drawn, 37,448,200,000 gallons. 



From Sudbury Reservoir through the Weston Aqueduct to Weston Reservoir. 



Month. 



January, 
February, 
March, . 
April, 
May, 
June, 
July, 
August, . 
September, 
October, 
November, 
December, 
Totals, . 



Number of 

Days during 

which 

Water was 

flowing. 



31 
29 
31 
26 
31 
30 
31 
31 
28 
31 
29 
25 



353 



Actual Time. 



Hours. 



713 
661 
744 
603 
738 
720 
744 
744 
549 
735 
533 
367 



7,852 



Minutes. 



30 



20 

30 

25 

6 



51 



Million 
Gallons 
drawn. 



1,153.8 
1,487.9 
1,848.9 
1,404.1 
1,772.8 
1,715.5 
1,685.1 
1,633.1 
1,609.3 
1,690.7 
1,539.6 
1,747.2 



19,288.0 



Total actual time, 327.20 days. 

Total quantity drawn, 19,288,000,000 gallons. 



164 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



Table No. 13 — Concluded. 

From Framingham Reservoir No. 8 through the Sudbury Aqueduct to Chestnut Hill Reservoir. 



Month. 



Number of 

Days during 

which 

Water was 

flowing. 



Actual Time 
(Hours). 



Million 
Gallons 
drawn. 



January, 
February, 
March, . 
April, . 
May, 
June, , 
July, . 
August, 
September, 
October, 
November, 
December, 
Totals, 



31 
29 
31 
30 
31 
30 
31 
31 
30 
31 
30 
31 



366 



744 
696 
744 
720 
744 
720 
739 
744 
720 
744 
720 
744 



8,779 



2,047.4 
1,552.1 
1,427.1 
1,358.1 
1,314.4 
1,232.4 
1,589.3 
1,706.4 
1,610.6 
1,668.6 
1,449.7 
1,475.6 



18,431.7 



Total actual time, 366 days. 

Total quantity drawn, 18,431,700,000 gallons. 



Table No. 14. 



Average Daily Quantity of Water flowing through Aqueducts 
in 1916 by Months. l 



Month. 


Wachusett 
Aqueduct 

into 
Sudbury 
Reservoir 
(Gallons). 


Weston 

Aqueduct 

into 

Metropolitan 

District 

(Gallons). 


Sudbury 
Aqueduct 
into 
Chestnut Hill 
Reservoir 
(GaUons). 


Cochituate 
Aqueduct 
into 
Chestnut Hill 
Reservoir 
(Gallons). 


January, 


75,597,000 


37,220,000 


66,045,000 


- 


February, . 










135,300,000 


51,307,000 


53,521,000 


- 


March, 










168,839,000 


59,642,000 


46,035,000 


- 


April, . 










92,947,000 


46,803,000 


45,270,000 


- 


May, . 










69,335,000 


57,187,000 


42,400,000 


- 


June, . 










91,414,000 


57,183,000 


41,080,000 


- 


July, . 










89,232,000 


54,358,000 


51,268,000 


- 


August, 










101,278,000 


52,681,000 


55,045,000 


T 


September, 










114,553,000 


53,643,000 


53,687,000 


- 


October, 










99,113,000 


54,539,000 


53,826,000 


- 


November, . 










100,517,000 


51,320,000 


48,323,000 


- 


December, . 










89,461,000 


56,361,000 


47,600,000 


- 


Average, 


102,145,000 


52,699,000 


50,360,000 


- 


i I 


Tot ii 


lclud 


ingq 


uantii 


ties wasted while 


cleaning and re] 


Dairing aqueduct 


S. 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



165 









•q.uauiao'BTd 


o 
o 


© , , , 


' ' s 


1 


1 


o 
o 


o 
o 


i 


o 
o 




-si(j .iaStmkj jo stsbq; 
uo 'Sutdumj ut pasn 
poQ jo'spunoj; ooi J8d 


o 
d 
o 

CO 


o* 

US 

°°- 


o 
o 
o 
o 
o" 






o 
d 


o 
d 
o^ 




o 
d 

OS 

5 




spunod-^oo^j ut AnQ 


CO 


£. 


oo 






co 


CO 








o 


O 1 1 1 


1 I o 


1 


1 


o 


o 


i 


o 




•dtjg JOJ p9^08J 


o 
o 


o 
o 


o 
o 






o 

o 


o 
o 




o 
o 




-joo iSutdumj m pasn 
psoo jo s'punoj o6l J8d[ 


o 

US 

o 


o 

OS 

us 


o 

OS 






o 

OS 


o 




o 

CO 




spunod-^ooj ut ^uq 


co 


CO 








«o 

CO 


oo 

CO 




CO 




H 
















^ 




^-1 




















CO 




CO 




'z °n 8 «i§ u a 


1 


1 1 1 1 


1 1 1 


1 


1 


1 


CO 


i 


CO 




















CO 




CO 




H "2 




















»-H 






























OS 


1-H 

CO 4 


. ■ * 






oo 

1— 1 


co 




CO 

us 




fc» 


•j 'O^i autSug 


T»I 


1 1 1 

US 


' ' os- 


1 




CO 


CO 


i 


US 




"4 




CO 


co 


co 






CO 


CO 




CO 






»-( 


tH 


1— 1 






1—1 


1—1 




~ H 




•Sutdumj; 


OS 


o 
«o 


■ , * 






oo 

00 


US 




t-- 




ut pasn tboq jo putlog 


OS 


d ' ' ' 


' ' OS* 


1 


1 


OS 


CO 


i 


OS 




jad p a d ui n d suorpsQ 


u> 


co 


t» 






co 


co 




oo 

CO 






OS 


i— i 


1— 1 






Ui 


i— i 




00 




•jasfuno 


CO 


*>: ■ ' ' 


1 ■ d 




1 


OS 


OS 




oo 




puB sausy jo "iiua^ jaj 
























o 


O 1 1 1 


1 1 os 


1 


1 


t^ 


OS 


US 


1 




•(spunoj) 


OS 

IH 


us 

CO 


o 
»o 






oo 
00 


OS 


CO 






Suidumj ut pasn ^oq 


CM 


<N 








co 


CO 


US 
CO 






uiojj jajfutjQ put* sausy 






















o 


to us us m us us us 


o 


o 


Ui 


1 


o 


1 






CO 


as o co oo oo os «o 


CO 


CO 


•* 




CO 






•(spunoj) 


t^ 


t-j_ co o os^ o oo_ -^ 


OS 


<N 


oo 




CO 






SunprBg; ut pasn feoQ 


US 


o co o t» c© *-i us 

us t- CO CM i-h 


CO 


>-l 


oo 




CO 
OS 
CM 








o 


© 1 1 1 


o 


1 


1 


us 


o 


US 


1 






oo 


oo 


o 






OS 


CO 


00 






•(spunoj) Sut 
-duinj; ut paumsuoo jboq 


co, 

CO 


CO 

co" 

CO 


CO 
Ui 








oo* 

US 
CM 


o 

1— 1 

o 








oo 


us 


co 






os 


•■<* 


OS 








oo 


** 


° 






1-i 


US 


© 






•(suoubq uot n iH) 


b- 


^ ' ' ' 


1 ' « 


1 


1 


CO 


d 


d 


1 




padumd A^ubiiq t^oj, 


i— i 


CO 








C<l 


oo 


US 








•(suon^o uoihih) 














o 

CO 


o 

CO 






d 


dtjg joj pa^oajjoo 


1 


1 1 1 1 


1 1 


1 


1 


1 


d 


d 


1 




o 


' p a d ui n d ^t^u'enQ 














co 


CO 
































.S i 


1 1 1 1 


1 1 


1 


1 


1 


US 


US 


1 




<5 




3 












CM 


CM 








•auitx Sutdumj fB^ox 


8 l 


1 1 1 1 


1 1 


1 


1 


1 






1 




M 




H 












CO 
6M 


CO 
CO 








•(suoipo notjiM) 


00 

oo 


US 


§ 






os 


OS 


OS 






TH 


dt{g joj pa^oauoo 


t^ 


*i ' ' ' 


• *; 


1 


1 


CO 


OS 


CO 


1 




O 


4 p a d ui n d fyi%wBn£) 












(M 


r- 1 


00 








.S>o 


«s i i i 


1 o 


1 




O 


O 


o 










ng 


co 


co 






CM 


O 


CM 






O 

2 


•aunj, Sutdumj ye^oj, 
























tOr-4 


OS | I I 


1 o 


1 


1 


CO 


CO 


co 


1 




W 




£us 

M 


US 








CO 


US 


cH 






i 






















o 


£ 




• • . 


u 

CO 

s 
$ 

ft 


u 




u 


!* 


oil 
03 
hi 

CO 










1 

1 


A J3 °Q 

© « ft « 3 3 ^ 
to § < S £ ►? <J 


Si 

« 

o 


H 

a 

> 

o 


a 

ID 
Q 

0) 

Q 


o 
H 


> 

< 



166 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



to 



e 

-»o 

O 



S 




© 




•^ 




«tO 




« 




•to 




CC 




©> 




R 




*r^ 




A 




g| 




3 




Qs 




i~«i 




"-o 




.'<° 




fccj 




"to 


n, 


^s 




S 


m 


•to 




co 





*4> 


<« 


^ 


71 


O 


ffi 




£ 




n 


C 




<30 


a 




-^> 


£ 


a 
3 

u 


<» 
£ 


K 


•^> 


-* 


CSi 


-*< 



« 



© 

to 

e 
O 



to 

© 

"to 



1— I 

6 

w 

< 



jo Sui^ajj joj norpnp 

-8Q OU :^U8U180B|dSTQ 

jagunij; jo sts^g uo 
jboo jo spunoj 001 J3<J 
spunod-^oo^j ut ^tiq 



•Sui^qgiq; jo Sut 
-;B8jj joj uoT^onpaQ 

OU Ictljg JOJ p3}08JJO0 

'FOOj6spunojoOI J8d 
spunod-^ooj; ut A^iiq 



•(laaj) ^jn SS^JSAV 



•3miq8i r [ 
jo Sui^a jj joj ubi^onp 
-aQou ;p30£) jopunoj 
jad padrand suojps*) 



pura saqsy jo '^uaQ jej 



■(spunoj) 
j a j[ u t i q puB saqsy 



•(spunoj) 
pamnsuoo I^oq 



•(suoubo 

uo HUK) d HS JO J P^o^J 
-j6o 'paduind ityi^u'enQ 



•axnix Snidainj p^oj, 



o 



i i i i 



i i i i 



i i i i i i i 



i i i i 



i i i i i i 



I I I I O I I I I I I I 



I I I i |0 I I I I I I I 



I I I I 



J I I I I up I I I I I I I 



I CO I I 



m 



b i • • • 

H 9 J 

e8 3 J3 — - 

•-S PH ^ <5 S I-* 1-9 



«< & o £ A 



•+J 0) 

o > 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



167 







to 


•(SUOTp3£) uo TT 


t- t- «o 

t~ ^ T-H T$4 


«5 

to 


00 




00 


ss 




S3"* 


•ITIM) padurnd 


»0 t— l-H T*H 

1 1 


, ^ 


o» 


1 





© 




a 


vf '^ t 3. u t* n £) 




i-i 


1-H 
l—l 


eo 
eo 




-CH 






^4 ^ 


83t«*8Ay ^n^a 














to 




fe w 


















°d 

fc-T 


•(suox 


00 »o 00 ■* 


00 

C55 


1—1 
eo 


00 




*§ 




el*- 1 


-1*0 a OHlTM) 


^ -I ' ' ^J ' ' ^ ' 


1 c* 


eo 


d 


1 


.0 




dijg joj pa^oaj 


t-I <M 


■* 


U5 

eo 


>o 

co 


OS 






g£ 


-jod ' pedum d 








1-4 


1—1 








D 1 ^ 


A^U'Bn£) p^oj, 














2» 


•gux^qSi^ jo 


1 1 1 1 


111 § 1 


1 § 






1 


O 


S5 




gni^Bajj JO J uorionp 















O 


§; 




-9Q on !^aaxn8o , BfdsT(j 






CO 


0" 
00 


d 




O" 


^ 




jaSunu jo sisug; tro 




eo 


«o 


" 5 - 




OS_ 


CQ 




'^03 jo spunoj ooi J a<* 





eo 


s 


00 




OO 

to 


1 




spunod-^oo^ in Aiiq 




t-H 


H 


1—4 




1—1 


•Suiq.ip3T r [ JO 


1 I 1 1 


ill 2 • 




1 8 


O 
O 


1 






■»-s 




Sup/eajj joj uoT^oripaQ 










O 







1 




ou' tdtjg -ioj pa^oajjoo 
'p300 jb sptmoj 001 J8a: 




y- 1 
OO 




CO 




CM 

d 




sptmod-'iooj UT A*:irtQ 




CM 

r-l 


CO 


10 




»o 


O 


















•c-a 








OS 


«o 


i-H 




CO 


HO 

C<3 
t 

•<o 








»H 


CO 


•«*< 




»o 




•(•)&£) ^JH 9SBJ9AV 


1 1 1 1 


' ' " ' gj ' 


s 


d 


1 


d 








1-1 


»-l 


1-1 




l-H 




•^ui^qSx^ 




1— 1 


CO 




CO 




CO 
US 


& 




jo 3m:i«aji joj ubi^onp 


1 1 1 1 


1 ' ' .« ' 


1 e>* 


d 


1 


■^ 


§ 




-9Q bu Ii'boq jo puno<j 






i-H 


CO 

»o 




CO 

10 






jad padtcmd suoTp3£) 




i-T 


l—l 


»-T 




i-T 


r«o 

p~o 






CO 


■ *° 


CO 




t* 


^ Co 


a 


•jajftnTQ 


1 1 1 1 


1 ' eo ' 


' d 


d 


1 


© 


a 


pUB S8TJSV JO •q.UaQ J8<J 




i-H 


1— 1 


f4 




1—1 




u 
































52 »n 


<*H 




II 1 1 


1 1 «o 1 


1 OO 


l-l 


■* 


1 


to 


t3 






(M 


OO 


O 


1—1 




'hes 
ear 


1 


•(spunoj) 




"* 


N 


CO 


CO 




J 8 3[ U T \Q pUB S 8 q S y 




•^ 


y— 1 


>o* 

CO 


1—1 
OS 




^ 


"cB 


















a 






























•><{. to 


53 





1 1 1 1 


1 1 O 1 
CXI 


1 "3 

i-H 







1 


. *". 


5S 


•(spunoj) 




"* 


CO 


t>^ 


00 




£"* 


(0 

a 

(M 


poxnnsuoo [boq 




evT 

eo 


eo* 



CM 


CO 

I— 1 
CO 


d 

00 




<» 


















£ 


















S? 








T* 


OS 


t~ 


t* 








•(suoiibo 


1 1 1 1 




fct 

1 oJ 


t^ 


CM 


l 


fi 

^ 




uo nnK) d ns j °j p^^ 




^ 


(M 


CO 


CO 






-job ''padiimd A^ritrenQ 










T-I 




S 




. 












O 






a \ 111 


1 1 O | 


1 »o 





»o 


1 


*c*> 








O 


CM 


eo 


»o 




to 

C3 






k 
















•aunj, Smdranj p3^ox 


ml 1 1 1 


1 1 ~* 1 


1 O 


CM 


CM 


1 








no ' ' ■ ' 

u 

w 


CO 




s 


eo 
O 

1— 1 




«tr> 


















S^ 
















to 


















8 


















<» 


















s 


















Q> 


















to 


















e 


















I 




a 














i> 




g 














T— 1 



















6 




a 














ft 


















w 
















ft 


ffl 






§ £ 1 3 i 

•? h s <i s 


u 


9 


g 


"c3 



9 

M 


EH 








S 5 5 5 A 


3 > 
O J5 


O 

Q 


H 





168 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



O 3 







•SurjuSri 


o 


o 


O 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


, 


© 




jo Sui^eajj joj uoi} 


o 
o 


o 

O 


o 
o 


© 
© 


© 

© 


© 
© 


© 

© 


© 
© 


© 

© 


© 
© 


© 
© 


© 
© 




© 
© 




-onpaQ ou l^uauiaoBid 


© 


© 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 




© 




-stq jaSunjj jo sis^y; 


eo 


us 

o 


CO 


© 

■«*l 


© 


© 


© 


US 


eo 


© 

00 


© 

CM 


CO 




© 
© 




no 'poo jo spunoj OOI 
jad spunod-^ooj ut A^tiq 


CM 

© 




•>* 


oo 




<M 
CO 


© 


us 


oo 

CO 


US 

CO 


US 

US 


"* 
■* 




© 




•Sut^qSi^ 


o 

o 


o 
o 


o 
o 


o 
© 


© 
o 


© 


© 
© 


© 
© 


© 
© 


© 
© 


© 
© 


o 
© 


i 


o 
© 




jo Sui^ajj joj uoi}onp 
-8Q oil :di[g joj pa^oaj 
-joo 'pjoQ jo spunoj 001 


© 
© 

US 

© 


o 
© 

eo 


o_ 

o 
eo 

oo 

o 


© 

© 
eo 


© 

© 
eo 
© 


© 

© 

© 


© 

© 
00 
CM 


© 
©" 


© 
© 

CO 

CO 


o 
© 

O0 


o 
© 

OS 

© 


© 
© 

US 




© 
© 

CO 

eo 




J9d spunod-^ooj[ ut A^riQ 


© 


•>* 


■^ 


»o 


-* 


co 


CO 


t>. 


CO 


CO 


us 


■«<< 




© 










© 


O0 


CO 


■* 


oo 


US 


© 


us 


US 


© 


US 




CO 




g 


'l osj auiSug; 


1 


1— 1 




(M_ 

eo 


© 


© 


oq 

CO 


oq 

CO 


US 

eo 


© 


© 


1-a 


i 


CO 

co 










eo 


eo 


eo 


eo 


eo 


co 


eo 


eo 


co 


eo 


eo 




CO 






eo 


CO 




© 


t~ 








3? 










us 




'9 '°N 9U T^ U 3 


© 

CO 


OS 


1 


m5 


CO 
CO 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


i 


OS 






-^ 


eo 




eo 


co 








CO 










eo 






CO 


eo 


















t-~ 


CO 




l-H 




■g o^ auiSug; 


1— 1 


OS 


I 


I 


1 


I 


1 


. 1 


1 


1 


OS 


us 


i 


CO 

o 








■«*< 


eo 


















CO 


eo 




T* 




•2up.u3ri 


o 

CO 


CO 


Oi 

o 




00 


«>i 


© 


CO 


CM 


oo 


Tt< 


CM 




u^ 




jo 3uT^t;8jj joj ubi^onp 


© 


CM 


o> 


© 


CM 


Tt< 


t^ 


US 


CM 


co 


us 


© 


i 


© 




-9q ou SpsoQ jo punoj; 


00 
"5 


eo 
us 


o 


© 


CO 


l>i 

© 


US 

-CK 


CO 


OO 
CO 


CM 


OS 

oo 


CM 

us 




CO 
© 




jad padumd suojp3Q 


CM 


i-i 


I— 1 


CM 


^ 


~ 


tM 


CM 


CM 


CM 


»-( 


9** 




«* 




•J85[UTJ3 


CO 


•**< 


Oi 


© 


«o 


"5 


us 


CM 


t^ 


US 


'J* 


© 


i 


CM 






O 


•**< 


o 


CO 


t^. 


OO 






© 


CM 








CO 




pwe saqsy jo "^U8Q J8,j 


































US 


o 


© 


© 


© 


«o 


© 


us 


US 


US 


© 


© 


US 


1 






oo 


CO 


CO 


>o 


00 


© 


eo 




oo 




US 


CO 


OS 






•(spunoj) 


CO 


i—i 


lO 


f» 


© 




us 


1—1 


t^ 


© 


CO 


O0 


(M 






CM 


US 


t^. 


eo 


00 


© 


© 


CM 


© 


CO 


53 

CM 


t^ 


t^ 






pauinsuoo pog 1^<>X 


•* 


© 

eo 




© 


OS 


(M 


CM 


us 

CM 


US 
CM 


CM 


oo 

CM 


CM 
CO 






•(SUO| 


■>* 


oo 


oo 


© 


«o 


CO 


© 


,_, 


">*< 


i—i 


CO 


CM 




t» 




t~ 


t>- 


eo 




© 


CM 


© 


t^ 




TJH 


US 


© 




OO 




-p3£) uoiinj^;) padumd 


CO 


oq 
© 
cm 


<m' 


© 
CO 


eo 
© 


© 
O0 


"t 
t^ 


cM_ 
CM 


© 
© 


© 

OO 


tJJ 
US 


CM 


1 


CM 






© 


us 


oo 


OO 


to 


O0 


© 


© 


CO 


© 


t» 


CO 


US 








CO 


r»i 


CO 


U3 


•& 


CO 


■"*! 


CO 


■* 


CM 


CO 


CM 


© 






•(suoi^o uoiniK) 
padumd A^ubuq i^ox 


00 
CO 

© 

ft 


US 

o 

CO 


00 

oo 
eo 




© 

CO 


CO 
CM 


© 

co 

US 


© 

US 
CO 


© 

US 


© 
US 
US 


eo 

CO 


© 


CO 
CM 
CO 

CO 


1 






•(SUO[p3£) UOIJ 




oo 


oo 

CO 


© 
<M 


o 
•** 


00 
CO 


o 


© 

CO 


eo 


CO 
CM 


oo 

CM 


us 

CO 


© 








-ITH) d HS JO J p«PM 


1 


CM 


00 


N 


t^. 


t~ 


© 


© 


CO 


© 


CM 


© 




i 







-joo 'padumd ^^t^ubiiq 




Ttl 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CM 


US 


CO 


us 


US 


CO 


•># 


t^ 






!4 




























■* 








a i 


US 


© 


*a 


© 


us 


us 


© 


© 


US 


© 


us 


© 


1 




£ 






•<*< 


© 


»o 


CN 


© 


US 


CO 


CM 


US 


CM 


us 


© 








•auiix Suidumj p;ox 


CO 


© 


CO 


i-H 


eo 


eo 

CM 


CM 


© 
© 


CM 

00 


© 
us 


oo 

© 


oo 

CM 


1 




W 




w 


eo 


■«*< 


CO 


CO 


CO 


us 


CO 


US 


T* 


CO 


■«»< 


■"*" 








•(SUOHBQ UOIJ 


T-l 


oo 
oo 




O0 
CO 


to 

o 








© 
eo 






CM 


US 








-HH) d HS i0 i V Q 1 0dJ 


co 


>o 


1 


ui 


(M 






1 


»— i 








00 






o 


-jod 'padumd A^uetiQ 


CM 






7-1 


















•* 








•s's 

253 


»« 


1 


o 


>o 


I 


1 


1 


us 


1 


1 


US 


© 


1 




g 




o 




tH 


1^ 








US 






«N 


us 









•aunx Suidum^ p^ox 


oo 


1 


© 


© 


1 


1 


1 




1 


1 




© 


1 




W 




fis 
























•«* 








•(SUOUBQ noi| 


oo 

© 


o 


















OS 

CO 


O 


*•- 








-1!W) d HS J°J pa^ow 


S8 


CO 


















.— 1 


CO 


CO 









-joo 'paduind A^utuiQ 


^H 






















«-H 






!4 




























^H 








do 


lO 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


l 


1 


© 


us 


© 


1 






-co 


eo 


















US 


CM 


CM 






O 

fa 


auiix Suidumj p3^ox 


1—1 


1 


' 


1 


1 


1 


1 


l 


1 


© 

O0 


CO 
CM 


© 
© 


1 








| 

O 


b 

cj 

3 
C 
03 

»-9 


la 

lU 
fa 


o 
E 




>> 


cT 

a 


"3 

►-9 


CO 

< 


>-* 

a 


c 

z 

s 

o 

o 


;-7 

a 

> 
o 


0) 

a 

Q 


3 

o 


i 

5 

> 

< 





No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



169 






•40 



©s 



o 
•c>s 
•*o 

•to 

s 

•<ss 



53 



« 



«40 




s 


0. 






CO 


w 


^ 


u 


o 


& 




TS 


C3 


£ 


<a$ 


o 


>H 


03 


© 


+3 


% 


8 


<a> 


f* 


*cO 


© 

a 


Cft 


<N 


fi 




&q 




^ 




s 




O 




*c» 




-*o 




« 




s~ 




<4> 




S-H 




o 




^ 




MO 




£ 




<w 




g 




cw 




to 




Ci 




■w 




Q 





05 

T— I 

6 

•J 
m 
< 



•Sui^tjSfj 











O 











O 





O 





1 














cs 











O 
















jo Sui^vaji joj uoi^onp 

-8Q0U :^U8Tn80'BfdSTQ; 

J83urtj,j jo sisrag no 





CO 

°i. 
co" 





i-H 
US_ 

CO 




OS 

e^ 

CO 





<o* 





»o 

us 




CO 

°i 
co" 





<M 

OS_ 

»o 


O 
O 

CO 





00 


O 

O* 











00 

^H 
O0 


1 \voq jo spuno j ooi JacI 


"3 


00 


co 


■* 


>o 


i^ 


-«n 


an 


»o 


iO 


10 




»o 


spunod-^ooj ut a^tiq; 






























O 





























1 


1 





•Sui^qSrj jo 3ui 


O 
O 





















































-^■B8JJ JOJ UOI^0np8(][ 

ou ;dtjg joj pa^oajjoo 


O 
OO 



CO 

OO 



1*4 






OO 




CO 







(M 

O 




CO 







CO 


CO 






CO 




'p3°0 jo spunoj 001 J8d 


co 
us 


OS 



co 


CO 


<M 

»o 





CO 


OS 


(M 


Tt4 


CM 




US 

US 


spunod-^oo^j ut a^tiq 


r-4 


r" 






















1-4 




l-H 


OO 


co 


OS 


OS 


i-< 


i-4 


CO 


<M 


■* 


iO 




-# 




i-l 





10 


CO 


t^ 


t^ 


■* 


l-H 


(>• 


i-H 


"*. 1 


. 


US 


•(^aa^) ^jit; 8312 J8Ay 


CO 
CM 


CO 

cm 


us 

CM 


CM 


<M 


<M 


<M 


CM 


■^4 
CM 


CM 


CM 




CM 

i-H 


•3ui^u3iq; 


1-4 

CO 


us 

CM 


1-1 


OS 


CO 


»o 

OS 


CO 
O 


3 


CM 


00 
00 


OS 




00 
CO 


jo Sm^eajj joj uoi^onp 


OS 


■* 


O 


■<* 


CO 





O 


CM 


O 





1—4 


1 


•«* 


-8QOU ;p30QJOpunO ( J 


OS 


us 


CO 
"5 


OO 
CO 


CO 


CO 


00 
CO 


CO 
■0j4 




00 

T(4 


•^4 




OS 


jad padumd suoips*) 


























1-4 




1-1 





t- 


CO 


IM 


1-1 


CO 


00 


IO 





<=> | 




00 


•J85[UTTO 


1— t 


■^ 




CO 


i-( 


r-< 


1-4 





T-4 


CM 


CO ' 




1—4 
1^ 


put* sausy jo ^usq jaj 






























US 


us 





>o 


*a 


»o 


10 








O 


>o 1 


to 


1 




CO 


cm 


»H 


■* 


00 


CO 


■"* 


<M 


CM 


O 


OS 






•(spunoj) 


us 


•x* 


IO 


1— 1 


OS 








CO 


00 


O 


CO 


CM 




j83[uiiq put? sausy 


OS 



00 


CO 

00 


«3 
OS 


OS 


00 

CO 


CO 

00 


00 


00 


00 
00 


CO 
1Q 


00 

00 






iO 


us 


m 


O 


O 


»o 


IO 





O 


IO 


O 1 





1 




CO 




00 


t^ 


!>. 


l-H 





i-H 


•* 







OS 




•(spunoj) 


t- 


CO 


CO 


tH 


rH 


00 


00 


O 


OO 


t~ 


eo 


l-H 




patunsuoo |«oq 


TJ4 

l-H 


S! 


i-4 


iO 
CM 


i-( 
i-i 


CM 

1—4 


CM 

CO 


SI 


OS 




CO 


CM 

co 


1—4 






t- 


us 


t~ 


t^ 


t>- 


CO 


t>. 


t^ 


t- 


!>• 


tH 








l-H 


<M 


l-< 


«o 


t~ 





os 





CO 


l-H 


>* 


t» 




•(suon^o 
uo TIITT\[) d TlS JO J P8^09J 





O 


1-4 


CM 


■* 


CO 


CO 


1-1 


CO 


O 


rH 


O 




s 


CO 




CO 

OS 


O 


co 


U0 




<M 


CO 


eo 
1*4 


O0 

00 


CO ' 


T)4 




-joo 'padrand A'^u'enQ 











O 

















O 


CO 


O 
i-H 






rt° 


us 





O 














O 





O 1 


IO 


1 




•S"* 


■* 





»o 


CO 











O 





m 


CO 






a 


























•auitx Suidumj tbioj, 




eq 





CO 


^- 





■*f 


"5 


O 


51 


CO 1 


CO 


1 




S?2 


OS 


Tfl 


l-H 


CO 


CM 


■* 


1—4 


CM 


US 


CM 









t» 


l^ 


!>. 


t~ 


t^ 


t- 


t*. 


t~ 


>* 



































s 


















U 




tT 




bu 




a 

oj 
•-s 


>> 

M 

h 

r 05 



(-1 
c3 


u 
0. 
< 




a 
►-9 


>-3 


-4J 1 

<n 

bJD 

3 
< 


(0 

a 

a 

4) 
02 


V 

49 

O 


Novembe 
Decembei 


*c3 
+s 
O 

H 


B 

E 

t 

< 



170 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



"to 




»H 




C5i, 




>-H 




J- 




© 




Qi 




>i 




<» 




>-sS 




ho 




S- 




© 




*»-» 




£ 




© 




*^> 




HO 




© 




HO 




<*2 




©5 




K 




•<* 




a. 




£ 




s 




Oh 




^3 




fi 




© 




Oh 




HO 




© 

50 


d 




m 


MO 




© 


o 


oo 


TS 




p 


© 


% 


^ 




o 




£ 


a 


*<s> 


CD 


§> 


a 


&q 


t 



© 
O 



Si 

s 

HO 

© 

ho 

CO 



o 

6 



•Sui^uSt'j 


o 

o 


1 1 


i 2 i 
o 


t i 


i 


i 


1 S 


jo 3ui}i3aji joj uoipnp 


o 




o 








©, 


-d(± OU ;^U8UI8D13|dStQ 


g 




1 








CO 


jaSunj^ jo sisug no 


t>r 




»>r 








'poO J° spunoj ooi J^d 


Oi 




oo 








© 


spunod-^ooj ui ^uq 
















•SupuSrj jo 3ui 


s 

o 


1 1 


I 2 l 

o 
o 


i i 


i 


i 


1 s 

o 


-^•eajj joj uoi^onpoQ 


o 




© 








o 


ou Idijg joj pa^oajjoo 


o 




eo 
© 








eo 


'P?oq jospunoj ooi J3d 


W3 




>o 








h* 


spunod-^ooj ui A^uq 


















eo 




eo 








<M 




cm 




I °. 1 


* 






1 "*. 


•(^3j[) %}11 93BJ9AV 


oo 




5-1 








1 »>: 

1-4 


•Sump!i r [ 


eo 




O 








eo 


jo Sui^raa jj joj uot^onp 


»— i 


1 1 


' d ' 


i i 


i 


i 


1 ui 


-agon IjraoQjopunoj; 


r^ 




CN 








CO 


jad paduind suoip3£) 


















t~ 




eo 








»-< 


•ja^uno 


© 


1 1 


1 eo ' 


i i i 


i 


i 


1 


puB saijsy jo 'juaQ ja<j 


»-H 




l-H 








i-i 




eo 


1 1 


1 O I 


i 1 1 


i 


i 


eo I 




»« 




oo 








eo 


•(spunoj) 


© 




CO 








i>^ 


j a 3{ u 1 1 q puB saqsy 


■<*< 












•^ 




CO 


1 1 


1 CO I 


1 1 1 


i i 


i 


<N 1 




o 




CM 








eo 


•(spunoj) 


t~ 




i-t 








°°- 


pauinsuoo [boq 


eo 




in 








CM 




•* 




<M 








CO 


•(suon^o 


CO 


1 I 


. ^ 1 


1 1 1 


i 


i 


M . 1 


U0 HIIW) d HS JO J P^o^-i 


CO 




■«< 








•* 


-joo 'paduind A^utuiQ 


















«"5 


1 1 


1 O 1 


1 1 1 


i i 


i 


W 1 




fl'* 




o 








^* 




a 














•aunj, Suidumj p3^ox 


S3 

W 


1 1 


1 «M 1 


1 1 1 


i i 


i 


OS 


o 
















a 


















;£ 


>> 




CD CD 


Si 


fi 

HI 
rs S 




la 
S 

e3 

•"9 


Februa 
March, 


■c ^' § i 5 5 5 1 


© 

s 

Q 


o > 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



171 



>H 

>H 

© 

•<o 

©* 

CSS 

S2 



Oh 

o 
Oh 



cq -a 



o> 



. 


& 


© 


o 


br» 


=3 


<"i 


eg 


<» 


■p 


S 


a 


•e^> 




Css 




S 


© 



6q 



© 

•<s> 

©- 
O 



<» 

■*o 

cs 

"to 



6 





at 


■(suoubq uo TI 


us 

OO 


C<5 

eo 


•* 
t^ 


.—I 


CO 


eo 
us 


© 


© 
OO 


© 


eo 

eo 


oo 
us 






© 
© 






~PIV) padtnnd 


us 


CO 


CO 


us 


© 


i—i 


t~ 


© 


t^ 


CM 


© 


t^ 


1 


i-i 






l d 


A^TIJ.U'BTIQ 


© 


CO 


CO 


© 


© 


t~ 


t^ 


oo 


t^ 


t^ 


t» 


CO 




t^. 






«g 


oS^JOAy A'jyeQ 












- 






















•(suoj 


U3 


CO 


00 


CM 


© 


© 


© 


CO 


i—i 


CM 


T}4 


© 


CM 








1-4 


eo 


00 


■* 


00 


CO 


t^ 


t^ 


i-i 


CM 


t^ 


© 


00 








38 


-r»D no TPTH) 


■«*4 


<M 


CO 


>o 


lO 


■* 


i-i 


© 


eo 


-<*4 


1-t 


© 


© 


1 






a 15 


dijg joj pacpoj 


o 
cm 


© 

1-4 


o 

CM 


© 
i—i 


CM 


i—i 

CM 


CM 


ICS 
CM 


eo 

CM 


CM 
CM 


1^ 
CM 


© 
CM 


© 

CD 










-joo 'podrand 


























CM 








A'^U'BTIQ p3!JOX 


































•SurjuSrj JO • 
Sui^ajj joj ' uof+onp 


o 


O 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


o 


1 


© 






o 

o 


o 

o 


o 

© 


© 
© 


© 
© 


© 

© 


© 
© 


© 
© 


© 
© 


© 

© 


© 

© 


© 
© 




© 
© 






-8Q OU :^U3UI90'Bf(isiQ 


o 
o 


o 

CM 


© 

OS 


© 

OS 


© 
© 


© 
© 


© 
CM 


© 

CO 


© 
1-4 


© 
CM 


© 
CO 


© 
© 




© 
i— i 






jagunjj; jo sisBg; uo 


CO 


-* 


CO 


r~ 


CO 


CM 


© 


lr~ 


© 


© 


us 


00 




t~ 






'l«oo jo spuno j 001 1Qd 


1— ( 


CM 


CO 


i—i 


i—i 
CM 


CM 
CM 


CO 
CM 


CM 


i—l 
CM 


© 
i-l 


i—4 


eo 

T-4 




© 

1-4 






spunod-^oo^i ut ^jnd 


































•gut^qSn; jo 


o 
o 


o 
o 


© 
© 


© 
© 


© 
© 


© 
© 


© 
© 


© 
© 


© 
© 


© 
© 


© 
© 


g 


1 


© 
© 






Sui^a jj joj uoponpaQ 
ou'idijg joj pa^oajjoo 
«|Boo jo spunoj 001 Jad 


o 

g 


o_ 
©" 
o 
o_ 
©~ 


© 
©" 

eo 


© 
©" 
«o_ 


© 
©" 
OO 
1-1 


©_ 

© 

©" 


©_ 

© 
© 
i-l 


©_ 
©" 
US 
CM 


©_ 
©" 
© 
1-4^ 

<3> 


©_ 
©" 
© 

eo_ 
•<* 


©_ 

© 
U0 
CM 


© 
©" 

© 

US 




©_ 

© - 

CO 

eo 

!>." 






spunod-^ooj hi jf^nQ 


1-4 


i—i 


CM 


i-i 




T-< 


CM 


CM 


1-4 


T-4 


i—( 


i-4 




i-l 

1-4 








CO 


US 


CM 


© 


US 


-H 


i-l 


r^ 


© 


US 


© 


■* 




1*4 








1-1 


•*< 


■* 


CM 


CM 


eo 


US 


© 


eo 


© 


1-4 


■«*l 




CM 






•f^aaj) wj aS^jaAy 


t^ 


00 


00 


00 


© 


© 


© 


00 


© 


© 


© 


1-4 


1 


os* 








CM 


CM 


CM 


<M 


CM 


CM 


CM 


CM 


CM 


eo 


CO 


CO 




CM 

1—4 






•SuT^qSTq; 


eo 

CO 


.-1 


US 
CM 


us 

© 


i— ( 
© 


CM 

© 


© 

© 


US 

© 


3 


© 

H 


o 

i-4 


1-4 




CM 
00 






jo Sm^Bajj joj uox^onp 


us 


CM 


eo 


eo 


© 


i-l 


eo 


t- 


CO 


US 


US 


© 


1 


OS 






-8Q OU tp30Q JO pimoj 


OO 

o 


^( 


eo 


© 


© 
i— 1 


i—l 


CM 

i-l 


eo 

i—i 


o 
1-1 


us 

© 


eo 

© 


1-4 

© 




00 

© 






jad padrand suopisQ 




























■""■ 








1-4 


CM 


00 


-* 


eo 


CM 


CO 


us 


us 


© 


■«*4 


CM 




eo 






M93[UI[0 


CM 


O 


© 


eo 


CM 


CM 


CM 


•* 


© 


rt4 


US 


1*4 




eo 






put* sausy jo "^uaQ J3<j 




































t^ 


US 


us 


us 


US 


i—( 


© 


us 


© 


us 


US 


00 


i—l 


1 








eo 


Oi 


us 


!>. 


© 


eo 


CM 


us 


CO 


•41 


© 


•* 


© 








•(spunoj) 


oo 




Os_ 




eo_ 
eo" 


co 


©" 


© 






»o 

1-4 


°1 

oT 


t- 








J8i[uij3 pun s a q s y 


i-i 


1-4 


1-1 


CM 


CM 


CM 


CM 


eo 


eo 


eo 


eo 


CM 


eo 










oo 


CO 


US 


US 


•<* 


© 


© 


CM 


© 


© 


o 


© 


i-» 


1 








©S 


CO 


us 


t~ 


r^ 


© 


1-4 


© 


Tfi 


i^ 


CO 


rH 


© 








•(spunoj) 


CM 


OS 


us 


US 


t~ 


© 


CM 


eo 


CO 


US 


us 


© 


us 








"# 




CM' 


us 


© 


CM 


lO 


© 


© 


CM 


s 


CO 


oo 








paransuoo jboq 


us 


t-- 


00 


00 


© 


OS 


— H 


CM 


1—1 




© 


**l 




















CM 


CM 


CM 


CM 


CM 


CM 


eo 


































CM 










1-4 


cO 


oo 


CM 


t^ 


© 


© 


© 


y _ l 


CM 


rJ4 


OS 


© 








(BHOnBO 

uo HPK) d HS JO J pa^o^J 
-joo 'podumd A^puBni") 


US 


eo 


oo 


•<** 


•"• 


© 


!•- 


t» 


1-H 


CM 


t- 


OS 


tt4 








CO 

1-4 


CM 

OS 


CO 

© 

CM 


US 

© 

1-4 


i—i 


CM 


i—l 
CM 


© 
CM 


eo 
eo 
CM 


Si 
CM 


1-4 
CM 


OS 

© 

CM 


© 
US 

cm" 










flO 


O 


© 


>o 


O 


O 


us 


US 


© 


"5 


UO 


© 


us 


1 








.3-* 


eo 


TH 


eo 


i^ 




us 


eo 


■*4 


CM 


CO 


■«S4 


© 










§ 
































•aratj, SuTdumj i^^ox 




^ 


CO 


CM 


CM 


t- 


OO 


us 


© 


© 


Tt4 


US 


© 


1 








eo 


■«*< 


eo 


US 


us 


OO 


© 


t^ 


CO 


US 


us 


CO 










CM 


CM 


CM 


CM 


CM 


CM 


CM 


CM 


CM 


CM 


CM 


CO 

eo* 








w 

H 

O 


































3 


















t-T 










©" 
fed 










a 
1 




© 

e3 


<5 


>> 


CD 

a 

3 


2? 

»"3 


43 

CO 

3 


© 

.£2 

s 

© 

© 


© 

© 
o 


© 

© 
> 

o 


© 

s 

© 
« 
© 

Q 


1 


03 

< 





172 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



cw> 

e 

•hi 

s 

I 

Oh 






^ I 

en 

C .2 

C> -a 

« I 



8 

© 






6 
pa 



•3ui}uSi r j 


o 
o 


o 
o 


O 

o 


o 
o 


o 
o 


o 
o 


o 
o 


© 
© 


© 
© 


© 

o 


© 

© 


© 

© 


i 


© 
© 


jo Sui^a jj joj uotprip 
-8q ou Iq.uauiao'BfdsiQ 
jaSunjj jo eisBg uo 


©_ 
o 
o 
co 

•<j" 


o 
© 

.—1 

o 


o* 
«o 

co* 


o" 

00 
CO_ 


CO 


o 
o" 

CM 
CM 


o 

CO 

cm" 


©„ 
©" 
•* 
t^ 

•** 


©_ 
©* 

1-4 


o 

CO 


© 
© 

00 


© 
©* 

■**!. 

OS* 




© 
©* 

OS 
CO^ 


'pJOQ jo spunoj 001 ^d 


UO 


U0 


>o 


•<# 


to 


o 


CO 


CO 


<o 


uo 


Tl< 




uo 


spunod-^ooj ut ^;hq 
































o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


i 


© 


•SuT^qSi^ jo 3ut 


o 

o 


o 
o 


o 

o 


o 

o 


o 

o 


o 

o 


o 
o 


© 
o 


© 
© 


© 
© 


© 

© 


© 
© 




o 
© 


-^Bajj joj uoijonpaQ 


© 


© 
oo 

OS 


o 

CO 


o 

00 


o 

CO 
CM 


o 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 




© 


ou !dijg joj pepajjoo 


23 


CO 


co' 


iH 


■* 


oo 


uo 




•«** 


'pJOQ jo spuno j 001 J9d 


eo 

uo 


eo 

"5 




00 


CO 

»o 


o 

CO 


CO 


CO 
CO 


© 
CO 


UO 


CO 
uo 


00 




CO 
UO 


spunod-^ooj; ui AjnQ 
































OS 


i— t 


co 


^* 


o 


t^ 


"4! 


•^* 


© 


uo 


© 


■* 




00 




OS 


© 


Tj< 


■* 


o 


1^ 


CO 


t~ 


UO 


© 


•«* 


CO 




OS 


•(-.aaj) }JH 83BJ9AV 


OS 

<M 


OS 
CM 


Oi 


T-l 

oo 

CM 


CM 

oo 

<M 


o 

00 
CM 


CM 

oo 

CM 


00 
CM 


CO 
00 
CM 


CO 

oo 

CM 


© 

00 
CM 


^4 

oo 

CM 




oo 

CM 


•3ut}u3t-[ 


CO 


o 

uo 


i-H 


eo 




o 

CO 


o 
o 


© 

CO 


© 

CO 


s 


co 
© 


CM 




© 


jo Sui^ajj joj uoi^onp 


OS 




o 


00 


Oi 


t~ 


CM 


oo 


•«*< 


eo 


© 


t^ 


i 


o* 


-8qou ^BOQjopunoj 


CM 
CM 


CO 

CM 


c» 


o 

<M 


CO 
CM 


CM 


CO 

CM 


CO 
CM 


U0 
CM 


CM 


CO 
CM 


© 
CM 




•<* 

CM 


jad padumd suojpjQ 
































•># 


"5 


»« 


OS 


eo 


i« 


oo 


CM 


© 


t^ 


© 


•«*< 




•<J< 


•J85{UnD 


o 


o 


O 


^H 


1— t 


r—* 


1-i 


co 


CM 


CO 


eo 


•* 




CM 

T-H 


puB saqsy jo ^uoq jaj 
































CO 


co 


«o 


r« 


C35 


CO 


o 


co 


to 


CM 


-* 


© 


CM 


1 




<M 


i— i 


«o 


C5 


o 


■«* 


CO 


eo 


uo 


© 


CM 


CO 


-# 




•(spunoj) 


r~ 


CO 


»1< 


O0 


CO 


IO 


t- 


OS 


T-t 


uo 


eo 


■* 


■"H 




00 


00 


eo 


oo 


»— 1 


o" 


.-H 


U0 


UO 


uo 


CO* 


CO 


OS 




j a 2f u t j q pura saqsy 


























eo 

i— i 






o 


uo 


*o 


*c> 


»o 


o 


© 


© 


U0 


© 


uo 


uo 


uo 


1 




CM 


o 


<N 


03 


CM 


IO 


«0 


CM 


t— 


00 


© 


uo 


© 




•(spunoj) 


c© 
eo 


© 

©* 


O 
CO 




1—1 




eo 

OS* 


©, 


CO_ 


CO 


CO 
CM* 


U0_ 
Tl* 


co 




pauinsuoo jboq 


oo 


t~ 


CO 


t^ 


Oi 


o> 


Oi 


CM 


1-H 


1-H 


© 




CM 






to 


© 


t^ 


CM 


CO 


00 


co 


t^ 


© 


© 


<— < 


■^ 


uo 




•(suoipjQ 


»H 


cm 


•«* 


ta 


CM 


UO 


© 


■«* 


Oi 


CO 


r— 


t- 


00 


1 


no nnw) d Tis j °j p9;o3-i 


r-4 


oo 


t» 


«o 


CO 
CM 


co 

CM 


CO 
CM 


CM 

CO 


© 

CM 


CM 


CO 
CM 


eo 

CM 


© 




-joo 'padumd X^ubtiq 


























CM 






«»° 


uo 


o 


to 


»o 


»o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


U0 


© 


© 


1 




Q r-1 


•—( 


co 


.H 


1-4 


1^ 


CO 


© 


CM 


CO 


*H 


© 


CM 






s 




























•aratx Suidumj p^ox 


m 50 


00 


00 


CO 


co 


oo 


to 


t^ 


CM 


1-1 


oo 


oo 


■^ 


1 




E«"~ 


UO 


O0 


CO 




o 


■* 


CO 


OS 


uo 


© 




© 






►S"* 
A 


■* 


»H 


co 


«o 


»o 


«o 


© 


uo 


uo 


uo 


uo 


oo_ 

uo" 




» 






























tn 






























E 






























O 






























£ 
































>" 
















1* 

z 

a 
s 

a 


u 






3" 


9 

a 

o3 
E 

B 




a 

ej 


3 


i 


E 

a 
< 




a 


1-9 


<5 


2 

5 

O 


y 

> 
o 

55 


G 
Q 


O 

H 


> 
< 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



173 



SO 
C3i 



© 

•Si 

©> 



3 

© 
•Ka 

f-O 



o | 

•xs © 

?S. © 



&q 



8 

o 

*<o 
•to 

o 



8 

HO 



CO 

6 

H 

pp 





to 

1-1 _i 


•(SUO[p3£) UOIJ 


eo 


eo 


O 


00 o 

co m 


co r- 

OO OS 


00 


OS 


© 
i-i 


© 

OS 


CD 
CO 




CS 






~UK) paduind 


cO 


© 


CO 


CO t~ 


t» 00 


© 


© 


© 


t^ 


t» 


l 


t^ 








^IJUBIl^ 












i-i 


















aSeiaAy a'p/bq 






























^ 
































































•(suof 


•* 


© 


»o 


rH CO 


00 CNI 


© 


CO 


© 


i-l 


"* 


00 










t~ 


<M 


Tft 


O C<) 


U5 00 


00 


© 


•* 


t~ 


t- 


00 








3§ 


-1*0 uo TIlM) 


© 


00 


o 


O eo 


CO t>. 


<M 


© 


oo 


CO 


CO 


1— 1 


I 






d TlS *>j pa^oaj 


iH 


tH 


cm 


<M CNJ 


<N CN> 


CO 


(M 


CM 


CM 


CM 


© 

CM 








-joo 'paduind 










, 






















Aq.i^u'en^) i'b^ojl 






























•3ui^q3iq; jo 
Sut^eajj joj ' uot^onp 


'o 
o 
© 


1 


o 
o 
o 


o 


1 8 

o 


© 
© 
© 


1 


© 

© 
© 


1 


1 


1 


© 
© 

© 






-8Q OU !q.U8UI8013lClST(2 


o 

its 




o 
est 


o 

eo 


o 

1-1 


© 

CO 




© 
OS 








© 






jagunjj jo sis-eg no 


t~ 




-* 


CO 


its 


© 




CM 








t- 






'P3O0 jo spunoj 001 J8d 


eo 




CO 

eo 


eo 


CO 


HO 

CO 




00 

eo 








eo 






spunod-^oo^j ui A^n(j 






























■SuptjStq; jo 


o 
o 


1 


o 
o 


■8 ' 


1 o 


© 
© 


1 


© 
© 


1 


1 


1 


© 
o 






Sni^a jj joj uot^onpaQ 


o 




o 


o 


o 


© 




© 








© 






ou !dijg joj pa^oajjoo 


Tf 




o 


00 


o 
if? 


CO 




OS 








CM 






'IBOQ jo spunoj 001 J 9d 






OO 
























spunod-^ooj ui ^iiq; 


eo 




eo 


eo 


eo 


eo 




CO 








CO 








I~- 




CO 


o 


o 


CO 




»a 








t~ 








eo 




** 


o> 


o 


Tt< 




© 








1-1 






•(^83^) ^JH 93BJ9AY 


cm 


1 


CM 


^ ■ 

(M 


1 od 


© 

CO 


1 


00 
CM 


1 


1 


1 


oo 

CM 






•3upu9ri 


eo 




its 

its 




CN| 

oo 


1-1 




CO 

i-l 








ia 






jo Sui^ua jj joj uoponp 


Tt< 


1 


o 


eo" ' 


1 -.«• 


Tji 


1 


T(J 


1 


1 


1 


i—i 






-a<2 ou ^03 jo punoj 


eo 

H 




its 

tH 


iO 


CO 

1-1 


CO 

T-4 




«3 

i-t 








its 

i-H 






jad paduind suojps*) 
































eo 




o 


t^ 


. o 


03 




© 








© 






■J93[UIlO 


(M 


1 


eo 


i»- ' 


yt 


CO 


1 


t-- 


1 






CO 






puB saqsy jo "^uaQ ja<j 








i—i 


i-l 








j 














y—l 


1 


© 


oo i 


1 ^H 


l« 


i 


t^ 


1 


1 


i* 


1 








eo 




OO 


<M 


i— t 


T-l 




i-l 






OS 








•(spunoj) 


>o 




i-H 


CO 


CM 


^ 




© 






00 








j a 5[ u t \ q put? saqsy 






i-H 


*# 














1-1 










its 


1 


its 


•O 1 


O 


© 


1 


m 


1 


1 


© 


1 








o 




•p-t 


o 


O0 


CO 




O0 






o 








•(spunoj) 


eo 




CM 


■^1 


CS 


•* 




eo 






«>^ 








pauinsuoo J is o q 


-* 




CO 

oo 




o 

1-1 


CM 




ta 






oo 

eo 

T-t 










oo 




oo 


(M 


C5 


CO 




eo 






CO 








•(suojpjQ 


its 


1 


O 


• 1 


. *: 


eo 


1 


oo 


1 


1 


© 


1 






U0 HITK) d HS JO J V^oqi 






TH 
















CM 








-jod 'paduind A^uenQ 
































Aits 


1 


O 


O 1 


1 "5 


© 


1 


© 


1 


1 


© 


1 








•K-* 




o 


CO 


"* 


o 




eo 






eo 










§ 




























'aunjL Suiduinj p^oj, 


2° 


1 




i-H 1 

1-1 


1 "5 


<M 


1 


oo 

CM 


1 


1 


© 
© 


' 






i 

o 
3 
































£ 




• 


• • 


• • 


• 


J2 


tT 


4) 




$ 


© 

bfi 
ei 
M 
© 








' 


1 

a 
1 


05 


o 


u >> 

ft 9* 


a 2? 


co 
3 
ex 
3 
< 


<D 

ft 

GO 


o 


O 
> 

o 


a 

9 
o 

ft 


& 


> 
< 





174 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



e -r 



*«**• 


.- 


>-h 


r. 


"^ 





s 




e 


o 




c 



'2m%v[2i'j jo Sui^ajj joj 


o 
o 


o 

O 


o 

o 


o 
o 


o 
o 


o 

o 


o 

o 


o 
o 


o 
o 


o 
o 


o 
o 


o 
o 


1 


o 
o 


uoponpaQ on :^uauiaoB(d 


o 


O 


©_ 


o_ 


o_ 


o 


©_ 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 




o 


-siq JaSunjj jo sisbq; uo 


■* 


CM 


o 


o 

OS 


o 

CO 


o 

CO 


o 
o 


o 

o 


o 

CO 


o 

CS 


o 

CO 


o 




uo 


*iw>0 jo spunoj 001 »d 
spunod-iooj ui itynQ 


Os" 


b-" 


o 


UO 


o 
oo" 


CO 


CO 


OS 


>o 

CO 


CO 


CM 


CO 




CO 
b-" 


•<* 


H* 


■* 


■^ 


•«* 


"0 


Tj< 


■* 


"* 


lO 


UO 


hH 




-* 


•Sut^qSiq; 


O 

o 


o 
o 


o 
o 


o 
o 


o 
o 


o 
o 


o 
o 


o 
o 


o 
o 


o 
o 


o 
o 


o 
o 


1 


o 

o 


jo 3ut^Bajj joj ubi^orip 
-9q on tdijg joj patp'ajjoo 
'p30Q p s'punoj 001 **& 


o 
o 

OS 

oo_ 

oo~ 


O 

©" 
CO 
©_ 
CO 


o 
o 

U0 
U0_ 
OS~ 


o" 

CO 
O0_ 


o 

CM 

o, 
t>." 


o" 

1—4 
OS_ 

l-H 


o 

o 

CO_ 

CO 


o" 

CS_ 


o 

o 
oo 


o 
o 

CO 
CO 

Cs" 


o 
o 

CO 


o 

l-H 
UO 




o 

o 
ui 

cO_ 
CO 


spunod-^oo^ ui ^riQ 


-* 


•«* 


eo 


■* 


•^ 


iO 


■<* 


"*< 


H* 


■«** 


«o 


■^ 




•«tl 


H 




CO 




os 




o 






CM 


l-H 


o 


<M 


oo 




•* 






t-~ 




■* 




UO 






Oi 


t^ 


i-H 


^ 


■**< 




CM 


i-h" • 


*?I °N auiSug 


CM 


1 


CM 


1 


oo 


1 


1 


"*' 


•>* 


CM 


CO 


t- 


1 


eo 






CM 




CM 




CM 






CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


eo 




CO 






1— 1 




i—l 




l-H 






l-H 


l-H 


1-1 


i-H 


l-H 




* H 




UO 


t~ 


CO 


iO 


o 


t^ 


oo 


CM 


■* 


o 


U0 






t^ 




■>* 


uo 


"* 


iH 


t^ 


CO 


CM 


CO 


O0 


CM 


oo 






•* 


> 


'81 '°M auiSug 


CO 


T}< 


CO 


t^ 


ft 


•<*< 


*n 


CO 


CM 


CM 


eo 


1 


1 


o 




CM 


CM 


CM 


CM 


co 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 






eo 


< 






























*^ 


Sut 


■* 


CM 


CO 


C5 


CM 


eo 


C5S 


OS 


i-H 


■* 


CM 


CO 




oo 


-^qSt r j jo Sui^ajj joj uoiq. 


oo 


CO 


CO 


CM 


CO 


t^ 


■* 


t~ 


o 


o 


CO 


■* 


1 


■<* 


-onpaQ ou ;p30Q jo punoj 


uo 


CO 


uo 

00 


CO 
CM 


oo 

CM 


co 

CO 


CO 


1—1 

»-H 


OS 

o 


oo 


O0 


OS 




CM 


jad p a d ui n d suo[p3Q 


■* 


** 


CO 


** 


Tj* 


-*< 


■>*< 


-* 


■* 


■«* 


■** 


eo 




■* 




o 


co 


t- 


CM 


»o 


CO 


^ 


CM 


CO 


OS 


b- 


i-H 




oo 


•J83{uno 


l-H 


lO 


UO 


Oi 


oo 


CO 


OS 


o 


CO 


CO 


cO 


uo 




CO 


put? saqsy jo - ^uao jaj 
































UO 


oo 


t~ 


■* 


O0 


CM 


o 


r~ 


OS 


oo 


UO 


t^ 


o 


1 




U5 


o 


■* 


OS 


o 


OJ 


i-H 


CO 


t- 


t~ 




U5 


00 




•(spunoj) 


tr~ 


CO 


m 


oo 


o 


o 


T* 


•>* 


•o 


o 


CO 


CM 


OS 




TjH 


CO 


00 


Oi 


C5 


t^ 


oo 


CS 


t~ 


00 


t~ 


t- 


eo 




jajpsijQ pura sausy i^oj, 


























C» 






CO 


o 


oo 


CO 


oo 


oo 


s 


oo 


CO 


CO 


CO 


o 


eo 


1 




o 


o 


t— 


OS 


CO 


CM 


CS 


t^ 


oo 


■«1< 


s 


uo 




•(spunoj) 




l-H 


•># 


«o 


t>. 


t~ 


o 


co 


iO 


t~ 


oo 


t^ 




pauinsuoo p3oa p^oj, 


CO 


CO 


U5 


IO 


oo" 


CM 


■* 
^ 


CO 


CO" 




CO 


oo" 


o 

CO 

us 






i—l 


CM 


,_, 


■^ 


C5 


1—1 


CM 


co 


>o 


l-H 


1^ 


U5 


rt 






uo 


l-H 


O 


oo 


O0 


oo 


CM 


CM 


o 


■* 


CO 


OS 


t^ 




•(suon^o wonRM) 


o 


OS 


i— ( 


T-H 


o 


OJ 


oo 


OS 


OS 


l-H 


OS 


oo 


OS 


1 


p a d ui n d ityi^urariQ p3^o j, 


CM 


i—l 


CM 


CM 


CM 


1-4 


i-H 


i-H 


i-H 


CM 


i-H 


i-H 


CO 
CM 






■(suoipo xionnw) 


OS 
CO 




co 




o 






CO 

■o 


00 


CO 


CO 

i-H 


uo 

OS 


uo 

o 




i— i 


dug joj pa^oajjoo 


CM 


1 


t^. 


1 




1 


1 


CO 


OS 




eo 


O0 


CO 




6 


' p 8 d UI II d AjI^UBTIQ 


























■* 




£ 






























































a 




•So 


1 


o 


1 


o 


1 


1 


o 


IO 


•o 


uo 


U0 


o 


1 


z 




s" 3 




CM 




o 






l-H 


*a 


i-H 


CM 


o 


o 




o 


•auitx Suiduinj p3;ox 




























fc 




McM 


1 


CM 


1 


1-1 


1 


1 


o 


co 




t— 


o 


CM 


1 


H 




«->t^ 




O 










»o 


co 


i-H 


CO 


CM 


eo 






w 




CM 












i-H 






CM 


b- 




. 


•(SUO|p3Q UOIUIJV) 


CM 

oo 


CM 

T— 1 


00 


3 


00 


l-H 

oo 


CM 
CM 


o 




s 


l-H 
U0 




CO 
CO 




i—i 


dijg joj pa^oajjoo 


t- 


OS 


CO 


1H 


o 


OS 


oo 


tes 


OS 


o 


CO 




co 




6 


'p a d ui n d jtyt^uBUQ 


*H 


T"H 


*"* 


CM 


CM 


l-H 


l-H 


l-H 




CM 


i-H 




OS 




B 






























































a 




•So 


o 


•JO 


U5 


o 


m 


o 


Ifl 


uo 


o 


o 


1 


UO 


1 


£ 




§ M 


•* 


eo 


CM 


CO 


«o 


o 


CM 


1-1 


o 


uo 




UO 




o 


•auux Suidumj ps^oj, 




























SB 




PcM 


o 


i-H 


«« 


t~ 


oo 


o 


o 


oo 


CO 


CM 


1 




1 


w 




£o 


CO 


00 




Oi 


CO 


CM 


CM 


■* 


00 


oo 










w* 


uo 


CO 


o 


CM 


C<1 


CM 


CM 


i-H 


CM 


i-H 




eo* 




gj 

o 




























. 


a 
































>~ 


>> 














^3 


«-T 


o 


>-" 
^2 


"fl 


©" 
bO 

c? 

M 

© 








3 

3 


•-9 


oj 

3 

«-■ 

Ph 


c 

S3 


<5 


cS 


a 


>-9 


00 

3 
M 

3 

< 


3 


0) 

s 

o 

o 


1 

o 


© 

6 

s 

Q 


o 
Eh 


> 

< 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



175 



1*? 


' . 


■•o 


--^ 


So 


SI 


-c 







fe; 
















*C 


Wi 


r 






c^ 


r- 








^ 


co 


> 


s 


cc 






5i 


■•■a 

u 


CH 


£ 




~«i 


ta 


as 


C3 


- 



"e 3 ^ 



CO 



o 




•<c* 


"»o 


^ 


"O 




^ 


*--=. 


Q 




S5 


C; 


.O 




S-. 


fe 


>J 




— 

- 


ss 


fe 


-«. 




<4> 


•5- 




S 


fe 


o 




*c>> 


"~~, 


"M 


©^ 


— » 








s: 




3 


• ^ 


co 


■•»> 






*. 




<3 


3 




•x 


c**s 


ss 


■«* 


o 


C 


O 


^ 


v. 


*=5 


5 


« 


**— • 


v. 




^> 




» 


a 


^ 






Ci 


•>—s 


■*-1 


V. 

«o 




a 


oo 


^ 


^ 

*» 


v. 


o 

u 


-— 




v 




* 


•- 


v — ^ 


^3 


1 


U 


1 


^- 


l~ 


§2 


C^ 


"»«S 




•ra 




^o 


o 


O 
A 


H 




- 




pq 




< 




H 









s 


































.2 t*^", 




































































"-5 s'x 


































ft. Js) 


































SS2-2 


eo 


IC 


CO 


IO 


t^ 


t^ 






OS 


OS 




ca 


oa 








c; 


~. 


r-. 


OO 


oc 


CO 


00 


OS 


O0 


X 


oc 


00 


OO 








3 &=- 


































































O rtVJ 


































o £ - 
































) 


U 


































— d 
o 2 


o 


o 


o 


o. 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 










ia 


00 


CM 


m 


OS 


CM 


CO 


Gi 


CM 


CO 


CO 


CM 








» i 


-e 


«o 


CO 


00 


o 


o 


CM 


CO 


•* 


CO 


t- 


OS 


CM 








































t^ 


Ci 




ro 


ta 


O0 


o 


CM 


•<*• 


CO 


CO 


CO 


o 








t^ 


t^ 


00 


JC 


X 


00 


C5 


C3 


CO 


o 


OS 


CO 


os 






























CM 


*~1 








rS c 


































— 




































o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


^^ 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 








mob! 


o 


o 


o 


o 




o 


o 


C3 


o 


o 


o 


CO 


a 








00 


o 


•* 


*1 


^1 


CO 


CO 


CM 


l>^ 


CO 


— - 


CO 


X 








Tota 
1 )istri 
suppli 

(( ialloi 


o 


o 


CM 


>a* 


CO 


CM 


CO* 


t^r 


**i 


LO- 


T»< 


-<*- 


t>* 








^r 




o 


CO 


CO 


C5 


cs 




OS 


CO 


o 


O0 


co 










Ci 


iO 


CM 


o 


o 


o 


c» 


CO_ 


CO_ 


■* 


CO 


OO 








o 


_^" 


cT 


o 


co" 


CM 


cO 


00 


CO* 


CO 


CO* 


I>" 


CO 








o 




o 


o 


CO 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 






z = 
PS m s 


fl i o ^j--^ 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 






ingto 
md 
tion 
lingt 
md 
mon 
lions 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


a 


o 


o 


CO 


o 


o 


o 






— ~ ~ 


•o 


CO 


CO 


o 


CM 


o 


■** 


CM 


"""1 


00 


1>^ 


ca 


t^ 






t< % 


OO 


O 


C5 


o 


CO 


co" 


o 


co- 


t>r 


•* 


^* 


CM 


o 






CO 


CO 


»o 


t~ 


•* 


O0 


o 




o 




CO 


00 


o 






- : i 




— 


CO 


o 


CO 


t~- 


t^ 


a 


co 


co_ 


CO 


00 


t~ 


00 






z Q ■ 

K« - 


tions of 
oston 
! Milton 
allons). 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


CO 


o 


o 


o 






o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


CO 


CO 


o 


CO 


o 


o 






3 — g 


(M 


t^ 


CO 






■<** 


IO 


CO 


O0 


co 


t^. 


CO 


o 






































? 4 > 


OO 


•**< 


CO 




es 


OS 


■* 


CO 


CM 


-* 




OO 


CO 






•^< 


«o 


■^1 




o 


C3 


CM 


•f 


-*l 


CO 


«3 


00 


«o 






o 


— 


CO 


t^ 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


O 


CO 


«o 


CO 






3= SO 


































, =- S S 
































z g 

- > 


-ta 5 5 x ^ - - B • 

-S Si :~ 1 i~ SO 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


Q 


o 


o 






o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 




o 


o 


o 


o 


o 










«s 


■* 




CO 


CM 


oo_ 




OO 


ca 


OO 


CO 






a ■- 


vH 


o 


CO 


CO 


cs 


r>T 


00 


t-T 


O0* 


CM 


c 


CO- 


~ 






CO 


C5 


-* 


IS 


CO 


OS 


■«• 


CM 


o 


I>- 


oo 


LO 


■<« 






l m 


3S 


o 


CM 


o 




t>* 


"*1 

00 


oc" 


CO 

co 




CO 


CO 


CO_ 






O - 

= 


































































a 


eo -^ 
































2 S 


Quinoy, 
Watertown, 

and Portion 
of Boston, 

Belmont an< 

Milton 

(Gallons).. 


o 


Q 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 






K > 


o 


o 


CO 


o 


o 


o 


CO 


o 


o 


CO 


o 


o 


o 






h: ^ 


BO 


t>;_ 


-" 


"^* 


t- 


CO 


o 


CO. 


CO 


l>^ 


r-- 


00 


CM 








SO 


1>T 


o 


l« 


co" 


t>r 


CM 


»o" 


CO 


•* 




CO- 


to 






"t: 


o 


LO 


CM 


00 


»o 




CM 


oa 


o 


CM 


co 




OS 






CS 


o 


00 


ss 


CM 


— . 


"*1 


CM 


•<*< 


co 




CM 


£-~ 






































— _ 


•* 


12 


•* 


cm" 


CO 


Ol 


co- 


-*■ 


•* 


If 


CM 


CO 


CO 






oS 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


co 


CO 


co 


CO 


ec 


CO 


CO 






— 








































a 
z a 


tions of 

rlestown, 

nervills, 

verett, 
alden, 

ord, Bast 
iton and 
lington 
allons). 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


CO 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 






| > 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


CO 


CO 


o 


o 


o 


CO 


o 






OO 




t>. 




o 


o 




CO 


~*L 


o 


CM 




-*1 






'-I 


^* 


cT 


o 


»>r 


00* 


CM* 


o 


l>" 


co* 


CM 


00 


_~ 


00 






l-O 


UO 


CO 


CM 


C5 


o 


co 


■^J« 


o 


CM 


CM 


CM 


CO 






Son 


■^1 


t-» 


00 


o 


CO 


i-O 


CM_ 


ca 


CM 


o 


ca 


ca 


co_ 






11 


z 5 5 ^ — «s ~ c^w 




of 




o" 


© 


CO- 




















(M 


es 


CM 


CM 


CM 


CM 


CM 


CM 


CM 


CM 


CM 


CM 


CM 






— 


S 
































a 


d c 
































z g 


.MO s^. 

C=x o ■ 

~~ B - s o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


co 








CO 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


CO 


CO 


o 


CO 


o 










US 

•<c* 


>-o 


CO 


CM* 


CM_ 

cs 




CM 

t>* 


CO 

CO- 


t>* 


"*1 


CM* 






~ a — = s — 


CS 




CO 


OO 


CD 


ca 


l^ 


co 


CM 


OS 


o 


CM 


CO 






~x 


£ "u -^ ~ '= ~ 


t^ 


r» 


CM 


r» 


CO 


CM 




CM 




t^ 


»o 


L~ 












































^*« 


»o 


•* 


CO 


o 


o 




CM 








CO 


CM 






•>*< 


•* 


■^< 


CO 


•^< 


•^< 


■^1 


■* 


•«*< 


•>*• 


•«f 


■* 


■* 






— 








































































































K 


























i' 








H 


























>> 








Z 


































o 


















M 




u 


CD 

= 

o 
o 

Q 


s 








a 


a 
9 
c 
i 


>1 

- 

3 
- 


u 

ci 

s 


< 


■ 


p 

c 

3 


3 


CD 

3 

< 


CO 

■ 

2. 

ce 


1 


1 

= 

a 

> 
o 

2 


- 

o 

'- 





■JB 3 

ft - 



z 


- 


J 


- 


w 


> 


B 


=s 






— 


>. 


= 


~ 


n 


d 




— 






a 


ci 


— 


5 


> 


— 


i- 


= 


■~ 


^ 






- 


fd 


— 


> 




fl 




r 


- 


CJ 


z 


r" 


z. 


a 







> 
z 


I 








CO 




a 






i 






es 


Sj 


e~ 


oa 


CO 










— 


— 


- 


s 


U 


5 


% 


t£ 


— 


r 


-^ 


B9 


T 


7. 


i 


■— 


-w 


O 






— 


*9 






3 




r 


cS 


o 


— 


> 


q 


Q 


! 


- 




et 


■ 




a 


■ 
— 


_2 


2 


9 

c-- 


3 


= 


J 










i= 


- j 


t^. 


— 


5 


i 


■ 



176 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 






o 
© 



3 

cc 

s 

© 

© 



o 

M> 

•to 






©> ss 

£ CO 

•2 ^ 

CO 

O 

©5 



CO 



CM 

6 

w 
►J 

PQ 
< 









03 


































^ ft 
Pm & 


eo 


■^J* 


CO 


rt< 


t»- 


lO 


© 


,__, 


00 


t~ 


t^ 


oo 


© 







to 


•«* 


•^ 


•t" 


•^ 


■* 


■<*< 


•^ 


»o 


■»* 


■* 


•^ 


■<J< 


-* 


O 


§ 


o 


o 




























fe 


o 


►J 






























Q 


cm" 


►J 


>> 


o 


o 


o 


O 


o 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


W 


CO 


■<; 


o3 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


§ 




o 


Q 


»"1 


CO 


*"i 


eo_ 


o 


°i 


"3 


eo 




c^ 


CO 


°i 


© 






t^ 


CO 




oT 


o 


i>r 


eo 


t>r 


eo 


CO 


© 


C5 


t>r 








u 


eo 


t^ 


CO 


00 




■* 


oo 


eo 


•* 


eo 


eo 


CO 


CO 








Pm 


eo 


eo 


■<* 


eo 


»o 


•>* 


■f 


CO 


V} 


\o 


lO 


«3 


•*»< 








08 


































'-."t^ 


oo 


00 


oo 


oo 


CM 


o 


^ 


■«* 


T* 


© 


"3 


Tt< 


© 








,? ft 
Ph o3 


U3 


«o 


»o 


"5 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


«o 


"3 


*es 


"3 


►5 




33 




























© 


125 


o 






























eo 

© 


O 

►J 


>> 






















































[3 


CM 


Hi 


o 


o 


CO 


o 


o 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


<y 


Tt< 


•< 


03 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


CO 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 







P 


eo 




t-~ 


eo 


t^ 


OS 


00 


© 


t-- 


-<*< 


OS 


eo 


■^ 








































»o 


o 


eo 




to 


eo 


>o 


eo 




oo 


■>* 


co 


© 








J- 


OS 


eo 






oo 


eo 


CO 




© 


© 




© 


© 








<B 


eo 


•* 


T*< 


-* 


»o 


«o 


CO 


t>- 


t^ 


to 


CO 


CM 


■* 








Pm 


































CM 


CM 


CM 


cm" 


CM 


CM 


CM 


CM 


CM 


CM 


CM 


CM 


<M 








oS 


t~ 


(M 


O 


Tf» 


m 


1—1 


CM 


CM 


CM 


eo 


CM 


■«* 


■^ 








rf ft 

P-l o3 


lr^ 


00 


oo 


l- 


t>- 


t- 


t^ 


t^ 


t^ 


t^ 


t* 


t» 


t>- 


H 




to 






























© 


g 


o 




























t- 


O 






























Bh 


00 


h3 






























H 


00 


J 


>> 


O 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


O 


> 


eo 


<J 


o3 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


© 


© 


© 


o 


© 


© 


© 


^ 




O 


Q. 


c^ 


eo 


CO 


»o 


H 


°i 


CO 


t-^ 


"3 


CM_ 


lO 


oo_ 


"^1 










t-T 




eo 


t>T 


o 


»o 


CM 


■>* 


© 


© 


© 


oo 










Pi 


»o 


•** 


o 


^ 




■>*< 


o> 


© 


© 


© 


CM 


© 


o> 








© 


°i 




^H 


°°~ 


o 


t— 


t>. 


oo 


CO 


co 


OO 


Oi 


O0 








Pm 


































oT 


eo 


eo 


CM 


CM 


CM 


CM 


CM 


CM 


CM 


CM 


CM 


CM 








oi 


OS 


■^ 


»-* 


CO 


CO 


eo 


© 


© 


© 


© 


t~ 


oo 


00 








«" ft 

Pm 5s 


CO 


t~- 


t~ 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


t- 


© 


© 


CO 


CO 


CO 


•< 




cc 




























H 


© 


fc 


O 




























05 


CM 

O 


O 
























































W 


IA 


►J 


>> 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


§ 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


E 


*JI 





o3 


o 


cs 


o 


o 


o 


© 


O 


© 


© 


© 


eo 


o 


o 


P 


CD 


y— t 


CR 


*a 


o 


CO 


■* 


© 


t^ 


© 


CO 


CM 


© 




































o 


■* 


t- 




o 






"5 


l-H 


i» 


OS 


© 


© 








M 


00 


o 


CO 


m< 


t^ 


ta 


oo 


"<*< 


(M 


CM 


-* 




t>. 








CD 


o 


eo 




C3S 


Oi 


00 


OS 




i-t 


.—1 


© 




© 








Pn 


































eo" 


eo 


eo 


CM 


CM 


CM 


CM 


CO 


eo 


CO 


CO 


co 


eo 










"5 


CO 


oo 


l^ 


oo 


e» 


© 


eo 


■«!»< 


CO 


© 


t» 


Oi 








rg ft 


■* 


■^ 


•>* 


•*f 


*# 


■* 


»o 


«o 


*o 


V} 


•«* 


■^ 


-* 






as 




























© 


fc 


O 




























ft 
3 


to 

© 


O 






























>. 


o 


o 


o 


O 


© 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


o 


< 


oi 


o 


CO 


o 


o 


o 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


S 


P 


<* 


»o 


lO 


oo 


CO 


1—t 


TJJ_ 


"^1 


CO 


CD 


"t. 


CO 


CM 








cnT 


oo 


eo 




eo 


t>r 


oo 


CM 


eo 


CO 




© 


© 








t-. 


CQ 


oo 


oo 


<N 




»o 


© 


CO 




© 


t>- 


oo 


© 








s 


CM 


°i. 


eo 


CO 


■^1 


■^1 


Tt< 


CO 


t^ 


CO 


"Ct< 


eo 


■^ 








Ph 


































CnT 


«N 


CM 


cm" 


CM 


CM 


CM 


CM 


CM 


CM 


CM 


CM 


CM 








S3 


^-1 


T« 


O 


eo 


CO 


CO 


co 


CM 


© 


1-H 


O 


eo 


Oi 


3 




05 


4° ft 

Ph 03 


l>. 


t>. 


!>. 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


t~ 


© 


t>- 


t>. 


t- 


CO 


H 


O 


8 


O 




























K 
B 

a 
o 


en 
oT 

00 


o. 


>. 




























o 


o 


O 


o 


o 


CO 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


3 


03 


o 


o 


O 


o 


o 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


P 


CO 


** 


o 


»>;_ 


CO 


co 


© 


© 


CO 


1—1 


© 


i>^ 


CO 






oo 


cjT 


t-^ 


oo" 


CO 


rtT 




© 


CM 


*es 


t>T 


© 


CO 


02 






u 


CM 


o 


r- 1 


CM 


t^. 


© 


eo 


^ 


© 


eo 


■** 


oo 


oo 








a 


CM 


«o 


°i 


CO 


OO 


OS 


© 


CM 


eo 


CM 


*n 










Pm 


































eb" 


CO* 


CO 


iO 


»o 


m 


CO 


© 


© 


eo 


© 


© 


CO 








oi 

^ ft 
Ph 03 

O 


CM 

T— 1 






o 

CO 


CM 

o 


CM 

o 


© 


© 

© 


© 


3 


© 


eo 

© 


U3 

© 


SB 



H 
03 

o 


i 


00 

g 

O 
2 






























o 


O 


O 


o 


o 


o 


© 


© 


© 


§ 


© 


© 


© 


cm 


►J 


>, 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


o 


© 


t- 


3 

o 


03 
P 




"5 


CM 


CO 

oo 


1—1 


CM 
CO 


© 


CO 


CO 
CM 


*>;_ 

■^ 


OO 


CO 

© 


00 
00 








o» 


S- 


^^ 


oo 


1—i 


»o 


CO 


© 


US 


t^ 


eo 


t^ 


U3 








h 


-* 


o 


C5> 


«o 


U5 


eo 


t^ 


eo 


oo 


oo 


eo 


eo 










































o 


s 


co" 


38 


Ui 


t^ 


t» 


© 


© 


© 


© 


f- 




© 








Ph 


oo 


t^ 


t» 


t» 


t>. 


oo 


t^ 


t» 


t>- 


oo 


oo 








H 


























o3 








H 


























9 


i 

u 
o 

>> 

o 






i 


























>> 


a 

.2 
"■5 
as 

ft 




o 


>> 

t-c 

3 
g 

03 

•"9 


03 

3 


o 
E 

03 


H 

ft 

< 


03 


a 


>> 

•-s 


to 
3 
< 


B 
2 
ft 


u 

3 

u 

o 


u 

<x> 
S> 

B 

> 
o 


B 

0) 

8 

P 


e 

■*■» 
u 
O 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



177 



CD 
• I— I 

-h= 

a 
o 

O 



to 

"to 

to 



£ 



to 

<S 

•<s> 

e 

to 



CO 

d 

hh 

n 
< 
Eh 









o3 


































^.tn 


© 


CO 


oo 


OS 


© 


■* 


to 


© 


© 


i— i 


oo 


■* 


CO 


o 




05 


Ph oj 


TH 


-<* 


•* 


-* 


«o 


to 


© 


t^ 


CO 


to 


■* 


•* 


>o 


o 


13 


o 




























W 


5 


o 

hi 

3 






























>> 


o 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 




o3 


o 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


£ 










eo 


CO 


© 


-# 


© 


to 


© 


t^ 


© 


CD 


co 


Oi 


oo 






© 


cN 


(M 


OS 


CNI 


co 


© 


00 


© 


© 


© 


© 


1^ 








hi 


© 


© 


■«*< 


to 


t^ 


CN 


© 


T* 


o 


OO 


to 


© 


© 








0) 


© 


CO 


CO 


© 


© 


r~ 


00 


OJ 


00 


CO 


CO 


© 


l>- 








Ph 


































oi 


































^."£5 


cm 


CO 


lO 


© 


1— 1 


© 


to 


•^ 


l-H 


eo 


CM 


1^ 


CM 








Ph o3 


■* 


"* 


•* 


■* 


to 


•<* 


eo 


eo 


■<* 


■* 


"*! 


eo 


-* 


si 

o 

H 
►J 

w 
































e 

■A 
00 


ft 

O 

►H 


O 




























>> 


o 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


oo" 


5 


o3 


o 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 




Q 


to 


CO 


© 


CO 


© 


CO 


«* 


to 


CM 


T* 


© 


""H 


CO 








eo 


© 


© 


t^ 


|T~ 


t^ 


t^- 


•* 




"* 


© 


CM 












co 


!>. 


© 


CNI 


-*< 


to 


© 


CM 


CO 


OO 


t~ 


CO 


t- 








01 


co 


eo 


eo 


•>* 


rt< 


CO 


co 


CO 


CO 


eo 


co 


co 


co 








Ph 


































03 


































»H."t3 


o 


© 


© 


CM 


1^ 


1>- 


r-~ 


© 


T* 


00 


to 


to 


© 


o 




to 


Ph ot 


to 


•* 


lO 


>o 


to 


»o 


CD 


t^ 


!>• 


© 


to 


to 


to 


H 


e 


ft 


O 




























O 
|Zi 

1-4 




o 

Hi 






























>> 


o 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


►4 




■< 


o3 


o 


o 


© 


© 


© 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


« 




o 


Q 


© 


© 


t^ 


CO 


CO 


eo 


CO 


to 


CO 




© 


eo 


■* 






























<j 








to 


CM 


t— 


© 




TJH 


(M 


CM 


CM 


© 


-# 


00 


© 






hi 


CO 


to 


CO 


© 


© 


© 


"■* 


■* 


CO 


t~ 


t~ 


CO 


CM 








4) 


t>. 


!>• 


t>- 


00 


CO 


00 


© 


CM 




© 


oo 


O0 


© 








Ph 














l-H 


•H 


. 1-f 


y-t 
















03 




























fc 






*H."rt 


a 


o 


r_| 


© 


•* 


to 


CO 


to 


t~- 




© 


© 


to 






« Q a 

Ph ot 


U3 


CO 


to 


CO 


CO 


© 


© 


© 


CO 


£~ 


t^ 


t~ 


CO 


£ 




t» 




























o 


O 


ft 


O 




























Eh 


eo 

C4 


o 


























































H 


^» 


si 


>> 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 




tH 


c3 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


«! 







Q 


1— 1 


<M 


CD 


■<*< 


t~ 


© 


© 


© 


CM 


to 


© 


© 


to 






























£ 








o 




CO 


<M 


CO 


<M 


© 


CO 


© 


oo 


© 


CM 


to 






hi 


o 


CM 


eo 


co 


© 




oo 


eo 


CO 


CO 


i-H 


CO 


CM 








© 

Ph 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 




© 






CM 


CM 


eo 










03 


































r?> ft 
Ph ot 


to 


OS 


t^. 


co 


t^ 


*-f 


,-H 


CM 


to 


CO 


CO 


rt< 


© 








to 


to 


Ui 


»o 


to 


CO 


t^ 


t- 


CD 


to 


to 


to 


to 


W 




OS 




























« 


e 


Jz; 


o 
































o 

Hi 






























>> 


© 


© 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 




o3 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 




CS 


P 


to 


CM 


© 


t- 


<N 


to 


co 


00 


>— 1 




t>. 


CM 


CM 






































to 


00 


© 


*a 


"CN| 


T-* 


^ 


© 


© 


© 


© 


00 










hi 


■* 


CO 


© 


© 


<M 


<M 


© 


■* 


CO 


co 


■* 


t^ 


Oi 








(1) 

Ph 


■** 


to 


■"* 


eo 


to 


CO 


© 


© 


t- 


•o 


■>* 


Tt< 


to 








03 


































'H.'S 

V? ft 

Ph ot 


co 


eo 


•* 


eo 


© 


© 


»o 


© 


© 


t>. 


to 


■* 


to 








"tf 


-* 


•* 


•<* 


-* 


■* 


•<* 


■* 


■* 


■* 


"* 


■*n 


■>* 


g 




to 


■ 


























to 
o 

« 


e 


ft 


O 




























to 

CM 


o 
Hi 


























































►J 




J 


>> 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


o 


H 




<" 


03 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


O 


© 


© 


© 


© 


H 




o 


Q 


t~ 


© 


*"i 


lO 


i-H 


© 


M< 


to 


»—i 


00 


to 


'-J. 


oo 










o 


© 


»o 


to 


CO 


00 


© 


oo 


© 


CM 


© 


■<tl 










hi 


-* 


CO 


lO 


tH 


OS 


00 


t^ 


-* 


■* 




oo 


CO 


O0 








0) 

Ph 


t~ 


l> 


^^ 


t^ 


!>. 


t~ 


t- 


oo 


00 


00 


t>- 


t~ 


t— 




• 




W 


































H 


































ft 


































O 


































a 


























hT 
03 

s 


a 
































>> 


o 

hi 

3 

>> 

o 




.2 

o3 

ft 

O 
Ph 






03 

a 

03 

•-3 


hi 
o3 

3 

M 

Ph 


o 
*-■ 

03 


hi 
< 




1-5 


>> 


Hj" 

t» 

M 
< 


h7 
o 

a 

<x> 
-h> 

a 

0) 


h? 
<a 

ja 

o 
-h> 
o 
O 


h? 

a 

> 
O 


h? 

a 
§ 


<» 
^3 
-(J 

hi 
O 
ft 



178 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



LPub. Doc. 



«T3 

o 
O 



o 



v. 

"hi 



© 

■♦»» 

©4 



8 
!"-0 

© 

o 

*•» 
cx> 



6 

w 

< 

Eh 











OS 






























fe 






fa. "2 

£ft 

Ph o3 


eo 


to 


eo 


»o 


t^ 


t^ 


© 


^H 


© 


© 


CO 


© 


© 




5| 






© 


Oi 


Oi 


00 


oo 


00 


OO 


© 


oo 


oo 


oo 


00 


00 




Si 

o g 


o 


EC 


o 






























o 
































© 


►J 




o 


o 


o 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 




« 


3 


>> 


o 


o 


o 


© 


© 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 




« a 


»H 


03 


00 


«o 


■* 


CM_ 


^L 


CO 


CO 


CM 


t>^ 


CO 


© 


CO 


00 






«-T 


o 


Q 


© 


oT 


c4" 


«i" 


eo 


cm" 


eo 


t>T 


W5 


to 


■^ 


■x**" 


1--T 








© 


o 


o 


eo 


eo 


OS 


OS 




© 


© 


© 


00 


eo 




§ 






fa 




05 


»o 


CM 


© 


© 


© 


C35 


© 


CO 


•>* 


eo 


eo 








s 

Ph 




































© 




OJ 


o 


eo 


CM 


CO 


OO 


CO 


CO 


eo 


t- 


CO 










o 




o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 










oi 






























H 
fa 
O 
D 

CO 

a* 
a 






Ph 03 


oo 


o 


C31 


00 


t-~ 


© 


© 


■** 


eo 


© 


oo 


to 


© 






OQ 


** 


<o 


■^ 


■"* 


*a 


© 


t~ 


oo 


t-- 


to 


•>* 


** 


to 






8 

O 

►J 
3 


o 






























>> 


o 


o 


O 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


o 


© 


© 


o 






t~ 


-«< 


o3 


o 


o 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 






o 


P 


© 


»o 


■^ 


© 


i— * 


© 




t>- 


© 


eo 


eo 


"!t* 


** 








































oo 


CM 


t^ 




© 


CO 


CM 


© 


CM 


© 


t^ 




to 








fa 


to 


t^. 


«o 


CO 


CM 


© 


© 


eo 


o 


to 


CO 


x* 


"* 












Ph 


CO 


eo 


eo 


CO 


**< 


-* 


© 


CO 


US 


-* 


eo 


eo 


-tf 










oi 




































Ph 5* 


© 


OS 


t>» 


CM 


CO 


© 


o 


i— ( 


o 


eo 


eo 


00 


o 










**< 


•<*• 


*o 


t» 


© 


CO 


eo 


»— t 


CO 


© 


© 


to 






fa 




to 










•— ' 


>"H 


CM 


CM 


»"• 


»— t 






*H 




fe 


3 

«* 


8 


o 






























3. 

a 
< 


o 
































>» 


o 


o 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 




*H 


<? 


o3 


o 


o 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 




£ 







Q 


°l 


°l 


o 


•HJ, 


© 


CO 


t-- 


eo 


oo 


eo 


"* 


eo 


© 












00 


oT 




eo 




t>r 


©" 


s 




© 




■xj^" 


© 










fa 


CO 


<o 


00 


© 


lO 


co 


CO 


eo 


•f* 


© 


OO 


to 










6 












CM 


eo 


eo 


CN» 


















Ph 








































oi 




































fa.-^ 


oo 


o 


CM 


■^< 


© 


^H 


eo 


^_i 


© 


to 


© 


to 


© 




o 




CO 


£ ft 

Ph oi 


"5 


o 


CO 


© 


© 


t» 


t- 


oo 


r- 


t» 


© 


CO 


CO 







© 
00 


8 
O 


o 






























m 


<o 


































KH 




J 


>» 


o 


o 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


8 


© 






wi" 


3 


03 


o 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 









Q 


eo 


»o 




•^ 


© 


© 


© 


"* 


■«i< 


CO 


to 


© 


<* 


































H, 








oo 


b- 


O0 


CM 


© 


CO 


■^ 


© 


»o 


to 


eo 


eo 


© 








fa 


<M 


eo 


Ttl 


© 


00 


© 




© 


eo 


CM 


© 


f~ 


oo 










<D 


CO 


eo 


eo 


eo 


eo 


■«*< 


■* 


•* 


"* 


>>*< 


eo 


eo 


co 










Ph 




































oi 




































*■".■£ 


to 


i^ 


OS 


,-H 


eo 


CM 


T}« 


eo 


© 


t-- 


© 


t~ 


eM 










<£ ft 
Ph o3 


** 


•* 


■** 


U3 


ta 


»C 


*a 


© 


© 


tO 


to 


"* 


to 




H 




co 






























8 

O 


o 

lO 


8 

o 
2 


u 




























































y 




►4 


>> 


o 


o 


o 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 






00 


3, 




03 


o 


o 


o 


© 


o 


© 


© 


CO 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 






Q 


o 


°i 


I>^ 


*c 


eo 


lO 


'-I 


**i 


© 


■**1 


*-*. 


©_ 


00 








** 


■■* 


t>r 


© 


eo 


CM 


CM 


lO 


tc 


CM 


t^ 


to 


t>r 










fa 


r^ 


OS 




eo 


»o 


■^ 


CO 


•^< 




C3i 


eo 


© 


■* 










© 


eo 


eo 


■* 


"* 


•>* 


r»< 


"* 


»o 


t<3 


■^ 


Tf< 


x* 


■* 










Ph 




































oi 




































*.t3 


,_t 


»o 


t^ 


*-H 


•<*< 


"5 


OO, 


© 


CO 


<M 


to 


CM 


oo 




a 




co 


f2 ft 

Ph o3 


to 


"3 


*a 


*a 


»o 


«o 


»o 


»o 


to 


© 


CO 


t» 


to 




w 


© 


8 

o 


U 






























>> 


© 


O 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 




o 


t» 


a 


ej 


o 


o 


o 


© 


© 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 









Q 


t-- 


lO 


eo 


eo 


© 


»o 


CM 


t^ 


•»* 


•^ 


CM 


t^ 


© 


































02 






t-~ 


eo 


© 


oo 


© 


© 


© 


eo 


© 


OO 


00 


to 


r>. 










fa 


oo 




eo 


oo 






"* 


CM 


CM 


CO 


© 


x* 


eo 










s 


eo 


•* 


«* 


eo 


>* 


■** 


■* 


■»*< 


T»< 


•* 


"* 


to 


Tj< 










Ph 








































































W* 




































H 




































8 




































O 




































M 




































s 


























fa 

03 
8 




a 
































>> 




o 
+-> 

fa 
O 

>> 

O 


a 
o 

v> 

a 
o 






£ 

fa 

03 

3 
a 
a 

•-9 


fa 
03 
3 
fa 

XI 

<u 


o 
fa 

03 


a 


03 


oT 

s 

3 
»-s 


"9 


3 
3 

<5 


fa 

<x> 

Xi 

s 

H-3 

~ 


fa 
6 

3 
o 


fa 
o 
X> 

S 

> 
o 


fa 

a 

s 

1 


fa 

o 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



179 



^3 

e 

■»-i 
O} 



l« 

HO 

S5 

*c3 

HO 

•<o 
ho 

co 

SS 

© 

e 

- so 

•s* Ob 

ho ~ 



C3 



HO 
co 



^2 



4 






u 
© 

ft 



I 

o 



^ 


o 


s 


HO 


o 


J** 


•<s> 

HO 


CQ 


», 


l^-O 




<3 


3 

co 


C§ 


o 


e 



! 



6 

H 

n 
< 





o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


o 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 






o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


o 


© 


© 


© 


eo 








o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


CS_ 


© 


© 


© 


o 


© 


oo 


no 


































CM 






r-l 


CM 


•* 


00 


lfl> 


OS 


•* 


© 


oo 


© 


Tt< 


OS 


•* 


b- 






I>. 


CM 


CO 


00 


r— 1 


© 


OO 


CO 


oo 


© 


no 


1—1 




CO 






i-4 


Jt>- 


CM 


CO 


eo 


t^ 


CM 


lO 


00 


T-l 


CM 


© 




i-H 


© 








































t^ 


CO 


CO 


00 


l-H 




CO 


CM 


"* 


O0 


OO 


no 


OO 










CO 


■* 


CM 


© 












© 


© 


2 


l-H 










o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


o 


© 


© 


© 


no 






o 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


C3 


© 


© 


© 


© 


CM 








o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


O 


© 


OO 


© 




eo 

o 


































eo 


00 


b- 


© 


© 


© 


CM 


© 


CM 


CM 


t- 




b» 


CM 






t~ 


CM 


!>. 


t^ 


00 


OS 


© 


l^ 


t^ 


© 


^~ 


CM 


t^. 


CM 








t~ 


OS 


»— i 


lO 


iO 


»o 


no 


t^ 


eo 


"^1 


t>. 


CM 


© 








































UO 


CM 




t-~ 




»o 


t^r 


CO 


© 


CO 


CO 


"# 


© 










CM 


CM 




© 




o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 














O 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


eo 






© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


o 


© 


© 


O0 








o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


l>- 




































CM 




© 


uo 


OO 


1— 1 


CO 


CM 


CM 


© 


UO 


CM 


© 


no 


-* 


uo 


t^ 




eo 


eo 


© 


»o 


© 


© 


T* 


■* 


no 


eo 


r^ 


CO 


** 


© 






■* 


CM 


■* 


l-H 


eo 


© 


CO 


© 


r~ 


no 




"*i 


CO 


OS 








































00 


t~ 


00 


CO 


eo 


© 


O0 


»c 


t-- 


CD 


no 


no 


© 












>H 


© 


o 


© 




© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


CM 












o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


8 


© 


CM 






o 


o 


© 


© 


8 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


8 


■^ 








o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


©_ 


© 


© 


t^. 


t-I 




T-t 

s 

1-4 


































no 


t>. 


a* 


t- 


b- 


© 


lO 


no 


CO 


oT 


■* 


O0 


U5 


CM 






t>- 


© 


© 


l-H 


© 


CM 


© 


i—i 


© 


oo 


CM 


eo 


■<*< 


© 






CM 


1* 


U0 


CO 


no 


•* 


© 


OO 




CO 


CO 


CM 


CO 


oo 








































l-H 


t~ 


uo 


CO 


ui~ 


CO 


eo 


CM 


CM 


CO 


1-H 


CO 


"*< 












1—1 


© 


OS 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


i-H 


© 










»H 


i-H 


'" H 






r-t 


*"' 


rt 


TH 


1— 1 


rH 


1-1 


i-( 










o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


8 


© 


8 


© 


o 


o 


© 


© 


t^ 






8 


© 


8 


© 


8 


© 


© 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 








© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


o 


© 


r~ 








































s 


uo 


uo 


CO 


t^ 


© 




eo 


^ 


CM 


O0 


oo 


•"* 


© 


t^ 






U0 


M< 


"S 


© 


OO 


00 


00 




T-l 


no 


^ 


"* 


uo 


t^ 






a 


o 


C35 


t- 


T* 


t~ 


no 


t^. 


t>- 


CO 


CO 


eo 


oo 


© 


oo 








































o 


00 


t~ 


oT 


t^ 


oo 


t^ 


CM 


CO 


oo 


CO 


i^ 


OO 










o 


© 


© 


00 


oo 


OS 


© 


© 


© 


© 


OS 


OS 


© 










i— 1 












i-i 




TH 


















o 


© 


© 


8 

© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


8 

© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


t^ 






o 
o 


§ 


© 
© 




s 




© . 
© 


8 


8. 


© 

© 


o 
© 


uo 
CM 


t^ 




A 

en 






























© 




<M 


1* 


© 




oo 


TH 




CM 


00 


© 


© 


© 




uo 




** 


no 


© 


© 


-<* 


OS 


CM 


r-- 


t^ 


00 




-<*< 




UO 






•* 


-e* 


CM 


"*i 


"^1 


© 


00 


© 


■^1 


no 


!>. 


oo 




OO 








































© 


CO 


o 


CO 


oT 


b- 


© 


CM 


I— 1 


oT 


© 


no 


CM 










cs 


© 
i-i 


OS , 


oo 


OO 


© 


© 


OS 


© 


00 


oo 


O0 


OS 










o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


8 


© 


© 


© 


© 


8 


© 


© 


Ttl 






© 


o 


o 


© 


© 


8 


© 


© 


© 


o 


© 


OS 








o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


t~ 


I 




00 
































en 


o 


uo 


oo 


•<*< 


b. 


CO 


oo 


OO 


© 


© 


t— 


no 


l-H 


CM 




eo 


OO 


l>. 


© 


t^ 


t^ 


eo 


CM 


no 


© 


t^ 


t^ 


no 


uo 


CO 






T"4 


oo 


■>* 


•* 


U5 


© 


-* 


CM 


i« 


CM 


t~ 


l-H 


CO 


CO 


oo 










































CO 


i>r 


U0 


© 


© 


CO 


00 


t>T 


OO 


i-i 


00 


eo 


CO 










00 


00 


O0 


t^ 


t^ 


00 


oo 


OO 


OO 


oo 


l>. 


O0 


00 










© 


8 


O 


s 


© 


© 


© 


8 


© 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


t^ 






o 


© 




o 


© 


© 


© 


8. 


© 


© 


© 


■* 








o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


CO 


OS 




t* 






























© 




en 


CO 


t^ 




■^1 


CM 


CM 


no 


CO 


© 


w^ 


CM 


■*" 


CO 


© 






00 


CO 


CO 


U0 


l-H 


t^ 


U0 


CM 


© 


© 


no 


© 


© 


© 








i-i 


CO 


© 


l^ 


© 


t^ 


OS 


no 


l-H 


CM 


no 


t^ 


no 


r>. 


00 










































"5 


CO 


CM 


OS 


© 


l>- 


no 


-* 


■* 


© 


CM 


eo 


© 










oo 


oo 


00 


I-- 


J>. 


•t^ 


00 


oo 


00 


t-- 


t~ 


l^- 


O0 










o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


O 


o 


8 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


U0 






o 


8 


© 


© 


o 


© 


© 






8 




© 


oo 








o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 






© 


00 


© 






































en 


CO 






oT 


CM 


© 


© 


t^ 


© 


CM 


CO 


© 


© 


t~ 






00 


•>*• 


CM 




CM 


© 


CO 


© 


CO 


CO 


© 


CO 


-># 


eo 


O0 






T-t 


OS 


© 


1-1 


HO 


■* 


eo 


© 


no 




t^ 


OS 


<* 


CO 


t- 










































CM 


*■» 


eo 


t>r 


CO 


r~ 


© 


00 


-* 


l-H 


tH 


OS 


GO 










00 


oo 


oo 


t- 


t^ 


t~ 


00 


t^ 


«>- 


t^ 


l^ 


t^. 


t^ 










8. 


© 


O 


© 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


OO 






© 


© 




o 


8 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


CO 








o 


© 


© 




© 


C5_ 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


"*l 


©' 




ut 






























© 




en 


uo 


UO 


CO 


OS 


■* 


•n 


i>T 


CO 


-tf 


00 




CO 


OS 


uo 






oo 


CM 


l>- 


■* 


© 


OS 


© 


© 


CO 


CM 


CM 


OO 


TM 


© 


eo 






1-4 


© 


co 


lO 


OS 




© 


CO 


CM 


t^ 


© 


oo 


"•1 


-CH 


t^ 










































OO 


© 


c» 


CM 


lO 


OS 


© 


CM 


CO 


t»T 


■* 


© 


OS 










CO 


00 


© 


© 


© 


CO 


CO 


t-- 


t~ 


© 


© 


t^ 


© 










© 


© 


_ 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


00 






o 


© 




© 


o 


© 




© 


© 


© 


© 


© 




CM 








o 


© 


© 


o 


© 


© 




© 


© 


© 


© 


© 




t~ 


t>^ 




*M 






























00 




en 


CO 


■* 


© 


lO 


CO 


OS - 


CM 


no 


t>- 


no 




00 


CM 


•* 




eo 


© 


Tfl 




tH 


t^ 


CM 


eS 


© 


co 


CO 


CO 


© 


00 


-* 






i-t 


»o 


© 


t^ 


t^. 


CD 


CO 


© 


y-^ 


t-~ 


CM 


TH 


CO 


t^ 










































t^ 


00 


CM 


t^ 


© 


OO 


CO 


t^ 


l^ 


CM 


CM 


uo 


uo 










© 


eo 


CD 


U0 


eo 


© 


t^ 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


CO 










© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


-<*< 






© 


© 


© 




O 


© 


O 


© 




© 


© 


© 


© 


oo 








© 


© 


© 




© 


© 


© 


© 




© 


© 


© 


o 


l-H 


l-H 




00 






























© 




en 


oT 


8 


OO 


© 


»o 


-* 


CO 


CO 


"<*< 


© 


■* 


8" 


uo 


-^ 






00 


© 


CO 


© 


CM 


lr~ 


-et< 


OO 


uo 


tv. 


© 


eo 


CM 






w 


CM 


© 


© 


CO 


© 


CO 


CO 


© 


© 


t~ 


CM 


t~ 




t^ 










































US 


»— i 


t~ 


CM 




CO 


© 


eo 


Tjt 


CO 




© 


eo 










r~ 


!>. 


© 


© 


CO 


© 


© 


© 


eo 


eo 


CO 


CO 


eo 








W 
o 


























Hi 








s 


















t-T 




l* 




bj) 


d 








>> 
>-. 

S3 

1 


U 

s3 

3 
£ 

05 

Ph 


o 
03 


'(H 
ft 
< 


03 


5 

>~3 


»-s 


a 

< 


0) 
JO 

a 

ft 

s 


0) 
-Q 
O 

U 

o 


0) 

a 

> 
o 

55 


0) 

a 

0> 

G 

Q 


S3 
u 
o 
> 

< 


.2 

ft 

o 
Ph 


S3 

+s 

'ft 

S3 
U 

M 

O 

Ph 





m 



180 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



73 

<D 

73 

J3 

o 
O 



I 






CO 



6 

H 
Eh 



03 
P 



c3 
O 





o 


o 


o 


© 


o 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


t^ 




o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


8. 


© 


© 


© 


o 


o 


CO 






o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


^ 


CO 
































00 


(0 


CN 


0O 


■<*< 


co 


o 


o> 


Cn 


© 




OO 


lO 


b-T 


•^" 


"*" 


1-1 


o 


CO 


Tft 


CN 


■<*< 


TH 


o> 


OS 


© 


© 


CO 


t>- 


OS 


CO 




«D 


CN 


CO 


© 


CO 


OS 


CO 


CO 


© 


CO 


© 


OO 


t^ 


OS_ 


CM 




*-f 


































o 


CN 


OS 


o 


CO 


CO 


to 


© 


OO 


00 


CO 


CO 


to 








1-H 




o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


T-H 


© 


© 


© 


© 


o 








o 


O 


o 


8 


o 


o 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


8 


o 


© 


•«*< 




o 


8 




o 




o 


8 


© 


© 


© 


© 


CO 






o 




o 


o 




o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 




to 
































CO 


IB) 


© 






>o 


o 


Cn 


■«* 




CO 


CM 


1*~ 


"O* 


t^. 


oo 


»-« 


OO 


<£> 


If 


OO 


Tjt 


*o 


t~- 


CO 


Iff 


CN 


,t» 


r^ 


<M 


© 




O) 


CO 


CO 


(M 


o 


Oi 


CM 


o 


CO 


© 


CO 


■^1 


© 


CM 


CN 




iHl 


































© 


OO 


CN 


OO 


0O 


■^ 




1-H 


00 


CO 




CN 


CO 


l-H 






o 


o 


o 


© 


05 


o 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 










i-H 


, ~ l 






1-1 


1—1 


1—1 


»-l 


1-H 


1-H 


I— 1 










o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


© 


© 


8 


© 


© 


© 


© 


CO 




o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


© 


o 


o 


© 


CN 






o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


a> 


CM 
































© 


** 


i>r 


CO 


CO 


© 


1-H 


lO 


CO 


CO 


CO 




00 




a* 




i-t 


00 


O0 


o 


o 


<M 


to 


CO 


O0 


t^- 


1* 


CM 


1*< 


oo 


00 




cn 


CO 


© 


1-H 


CO 


OO 




CM 


r^ 


00 


CM 


CM 


t^ 


■* 






y4 


































t>r 


b- 


o 


CO 


110 


■«* 


CO 


to 


OJ 


HO 




oo 


o* 


»"H 






i-H 


CN 


~H 


o 


o 


i«H 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 








o 


O 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


© 


© 


© 


8 


© 


© 


© 


© 




o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


© 


o 




© 


© 


1-H 






© 


© 


o 


o 


o 


o 


© 


© 


© 




© 


© 


© 


t^ 


CO 
































© 


«*» 


c£ 


CO 




CO 




CO 


-tfl 


© 


© 


CO 




© 


CO 


to 


w4 


OO 


i— 1 


t-» 


OO 




C5 


on 


to 


">*< 


lO 


1*< 


O0 


CO 


lO 




o> 


T* 


b- 


OO 


o 


CO 




© 


CO 


<*< 


r~ 


"* 


■* 


1* 






i-C 
































CO 


© 


t-- 


■*t< 


•* 


OO 


CM 


CO 


K0 


CO 




CM 


t>r 










CN 


o 


o 


o 


o 




© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 








© 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 




o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


© 


o 


© 


o 


8 


o 


© 


© 






o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


lO 


»o 
































© 


CM 


t^ 


o 


Tf< 


00 


00 


CO 


1-H 


00 


CM 


© 


© 


"* 


CO 


CZ 


»-f 


*■» 


T* 


o 


o 


tH 


OS 


to 


CO 


lO 


CM 


oo 


1-H 


•^ 


CN 




©> 


cn 


-* 


O0 


CO 


"5 


r-- 


CN 


© 


CO 


CM 


CM 




U3 


1-H 




^4 


































t^ 


i-H 


CM 


CO 


-rH 


00 


© 


CM 


<M 


© 


OS 


© 


00 


1-H 






CO 


■"* 


(M 


i— 1 






CN 


1-t 




i-H 


© 


1-H 










o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


CO 




o 


o 


o 


© 


o 


o 


© 


© 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


OS 






© 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


CN 


CO 
































o 


»-f 




© 


cs 


CO 


lO 


US 


CM 


1-H 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CN 




CO 


*4 


OO 


"5 


to 


tO 


OS 


-* 


>fi 


© 


CN 


t^ 


t» 


OS 


lO 


© 




(A 


CM 


CO 


CO 


CO 


o 




© 


© 


1-^ 


00 


CO 


U0 


© 






^■4 


































CO 


TJH 


to 


1-H 


00 


Tft 


CO 


1-H 


OO 


to 


U0 


tjT 


CO 


T-t 






CM 


CM 


1— 1 


1-H 






CM 




© 


© 


o 


© 










o 


o 


o 


© 


o 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


o 


© 


© 


© 


I— 1 




o 


o 


o 


o 




o 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


OS 






© 


o 


o 


o 




o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


OS 
































© 


O 


OO 


CO 


0O 


lO 


CO 


Cn 


CO 


CO 


■* 


CM 


oo 


■** 


oo 


t«r 


r4 


to 


OS 


r-~ 


r~ 


1^ 


OO 


** 


t-^ 


CO 


CO 


CN 


OS 


lO 


t^ 




o> 


to 


o 


o 


t^ 


o 


o 


t^ 


CO 


•<*< 


CO 


m 


© 


■"*! 


© 




»-f 
































t^r 


1-H 


(^ 


CM 


CM 


TJ< 


CM 


00 


CM 


CN 


t>~ 


1-H 


t-T 








cn 


CO 




I— 1 


T— 1 




CM 


TH 


1—1 




© 


CN 










o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


o 


© 


© 


00 




© 


O 


o 


o 


o 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


o 


© 


CN 






© 


© 


© 


o 


o 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


•* 


CO 


































« 


to" 


CO* 


CM 


U0 


lO 


cs> 


lO 




CO 


© 


"*l 


CO 


i-H 






o 


t^ 


to 


-*i 


CO 


o 


t^ 


© 


OO 


Tf( 


CO 


to 


CO 


«s 


U0 




fi 


CN 


t~ 


00 


CO 


CO 




t^ 


t- 


© 


OS 


CO 


t^ 


00 


© 




1-4 
































CO 


o 


CO 


»c 


CO 


»o 


CD 


!-H 


00 


US 


1— H 


lO 


(M 


1— 1 






CO 


CO 


CN 


<M 


C^l 


<M 


CN 


<M 


1-H 






1-H 


CN 








o 


o 


o 


o 


8 


o 


© 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


o 


© 


M< 




o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


© 


© 


© 


8. 


8 


© 


© 


OS 






© 


© 


o 


o 


o 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


oo 


t>I 
































CN 


00 


c© 


Gb 


•>tl 


CO 


o 


CO 


CN 


CO 


CN 


OS 


OS 


00 


cn" 


uo 


o 


l^ 


OS 


OO 


<M 


-* 


■<* 


CO 


t^ 


t^ 


OO 


»"H 


© 




CN 




en 


CO 




OO 


OS 


o 


OO 


CM 


© 


OS 


1-H 


1-H 


"* 


t^ 


© 




»-t 
































CM 


to 


OO 


OO 


^H 


OS 


00 


CO 


OS 


T* 


b- 


•* 


© 


1-\ 






CO 


*# 


(M 


CN 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CM 


CN 


CM 


1-H 


CM 


CO 








© 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


© 


© 


© 


o 


© 


© 


C5 


© 


to 




o 


© 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


© 


8 


© 


8 


8. 


CN 






o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


to 


t-- 
































CN 


t- 


o 


CM 


CM 


CO 


CM 


CO 


Oi 


O0 






^ 


1^ 




t-~ 


e 


CO 


CM 


o 


*o 


o 


CN 


t~ 


OS 


><0 


ITS 


CN 


© 


CO 


8 




o> 


t^ 


00 


CNI 


m 


»o 


CO 


t^ 


© 


t^ 


© 


to 


Tt< 


«o 




H 
































I-- 


o 


■* 




CO 


tn 


00 


1-H 


M< 


■"*< 


OS 


CN 


00 


1-H 






CO 


lO 


CO 


CM 


<M 


Cn 


CN 


CO 


CN 


CN 


»-t 


<N 


CN 








o 


© 


o 


o 


o 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 





© 


© 


© 


•<* 




© 


o 


© 


o 




o 


8 


o 


© 


© 




© 


8. 


CN 






o 


© 


o 


o 




o 


© 


© 


© 




© 


t^ 


■** 
































CM 


to 


CO 


CO 


o 


OO 


Tf< 


CM 


CO 




>o 




CO 


"0 


»o 




o 


© 


CO 


l^ 


Cm 


o 


OO 


CM 


© 


OO 


© 


■«*< 


OS . 


00 


oo 




•J 


o 


t^ 


to 


■^1 


T»H 


O0 


t^ 


"5 


CO 


uo 


t-^ 


OS 


© 


© 




t-I 
































<o 


o 


CO 


00 


(M 


^H 


00 


© 


1-H 


© 


CO 


© 


CN 








CM 


CO 


CN 




CN 


(M 




CN 


CM 


i-H 


1-H 


CO 


CN 








g 


g 


g 


g 


o 


o 

8. 


8 


8 


8 


8 


8 


o 
o 


© 
© 


© 

CN 


CO 














© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


OS 


t>^ 
































CN 


IA 


oo 


to 


© 


OO. 


s 


*— 1 


o> 


00 


CO 




CO 


CO 




to 




i 


t^ 


© 


&~ 


o» 


^ 


CO 


US 


© 


© 


OS 


© 


t*. 


to 




00 


to 


00 


OO 


OO 


t^ 






CO 


CO 


to 


to 


OS 




w 
































© 


© 


o 




»o 


r>T 


-*< 




© 


OO 


CO 


CN 


i-H 








CO 


"<*< 


CN 








CM 


CN 


CN 


1-H 


1-H 


CN 


CN 






g 

o 

M 


bT, 


















«-T 


u 
B 


0> 


rt 

c 

0> 


.2 


c6 

40 
'ft 

u 




h 

0] 

3 
d 

a 


a 


o 
c 

c5 


m 


>> 

CJ 

1 — 1 


a 

•-9 


>-> 


co 

a 

9 

< 


g 

a 


<x> 
o 

o 

o 




CD 

> 
o 




o 
6 
o 

Q 


> 

< 


CJ 

ft 






c 
o 



T) 




O 




£ 




3 


171 


ID 


a 


a 


bf! 


o 


fl 





d 


u 


DQ 


o 


«*H 


S3 


u 


& 


d 


o 


^ 


4B 


Q 

4» 


43 


O 

A 

4» 


$ 


<*-. 




o 


U 


d 


A 


o 


43 
O 

o 


o 
9 


■+> 












CO 


d 


CM 


s 


o 


m 


^ 


CJ 




13 




d 


J^> 


od 


a 




H 




a 


U 







T! 


^ 




d 


d 


qfl 


B 


43 


a> 


^ 




o 

ft 

o 
u 


0> 


-^ 




a> 


CO 

d 


s 


f; 


2 





rd 


+j 


■p 


T5 


a 


a 


p 


f, 


Ih 








V! 








^2 


O 


ft 


D 


ft 


B 


a 


HJ 




c 


d 




$ 




^ 


a 


o 


3 


c 






a 

o 
5 


CO 

a 




+s 


o 


3 


43 


Q 


rt 




fe 









,4 


-t-> 


4* 




8 


Q 


T) 


H 





4S 


d 


* 


Q 


d 




03 


^ 


-m 


gfl 


^3 


43 


a 


i 


p 

6 


H 


01 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



181 



© 

SO 

•<?3 

o 



© 



05 
•to 

© 
C3 






fe § 



° ft 

© J3 

<^ Pu 

mo £2. 



© 

r«o 

© 

o 



oo 

(Nl 

6 

H 

m 
Eh 



•ssaupi^H 



•amiopqo 



rl00HHOOHHOOHOOHOH«lO<9HOHO 
_J O <-H »-* r-i rH r-I rH 1-4 r-i H rH rH rH i-( r-I O rH O »H <-• I-J H 

(MOONOOSON>ONOtO<0'*OOfOiO(MO'*»000000 



papuadsng 



•paAjossiQ 



'I^ox 



•39-1,1 



0rHC<lC^0OrHrHCN'C<ie«3rH'rjl0CqrH<rc|rHC''30rH0rH 

ooooooooooooooooooooooo 
ooooooooooooooooooooooo 



«0-<S<tt>TtCCvl<M'>!j<-<*l00c0Tjl00C5"*00->*l00C0OO<MOC<l 

COHOHHOOOOHrtNOO)HWMiOINrl<OONH 

rH O r- tl-HT— tOi-Hi-H'™<T-Hr-HrHr-HT— It— It-Hi-Ht-Ht— If- It— I r- I rH 

OOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO 



t0!0'*W<JI00C0(»NOClT)tO!0<0'!(IO'*N<0(NIN^ 

NHrHHIMNHrHHrtOHOMOINIMINNHNTjHN 

ooooooooooooooooooooooo 
ooooooooooooooooooooooo 



1 

pa O . 

Q t?2 


Res 

ON E 
■BAT 



'UOI^TUSI 

no 9B<yj 



*I^ox 



i i i i i i 



iOOOOOOOO»CO>Otf5«5 



"•- W~> **.* >W ^^ \m~* S_* >»— ' ***< V— * •*•» UJ »*./ 

^OO^»-iioh(DSDO«)W00 



(Mcoeocococoeoco(Neccsio3e«3 



• I I I I I I 



M 
O 
P 

O 



■a 



2 
o 
o 






0>r 

3-9 



SrQrO 



H©o3©®c3©a^^<D®o-5'm'©^^<Da>a>*t;r5 



©s.©©.-©©©©©©© ^ © <u ._ a> © « _ 
■*s +» .2 -p *> .2 p 43 43 43 ^3 43 43 ..h .2 43 43 .rt 43 43 43 •'2 --j 

^a-pfla-pflflflcirteifl^-pflfl^flaa^,* 

SH «|H GG«iH*iH 03 .rH *iH «rH »iH..H »rH .** ^* 03 • pH • iH *** • rH - rH • r-I **H ^~* 



© © ©©©©©©© ©©©©©©©© 

rQ ©J2 ©' <]J Q >.QJ23rQ r Q33 ,i>j233-Q3.0rO,Q 
to •— -t o3 --< *-h *— « ot to" ^ to" to" c3 ^ »— i OT^r$TO"OT^c3TO"TO"o3 

■P^+'rQiJJi+'+'-H-P+'+'-P £ 4^ -P -P -P +5 +5 -P -P 

®cSH>o3mm <I>ll, 3J <u< l ) 0) , I ) c3 < l )< W<B V® © © © 
tj)4i bi).p -p -p bO bfl bl) bO hD bD bfl-p bfl bfl bi, bJO bfl bjO bfl bfl 
©©©©©©©©©©©©©©©©©©©©•©© 
r >bD>bBbflbC P >>- r > f >> r *>bC> r > r >> r >>- r > r > 

j>> > >> > > > ,>?,>•,>>.>? j>>,>.j>> > j^ j^ ,£?.£? jjij „£? j^ 

**H.3**^.S.S-rH* 4H *^^ ,4 ^^ H ** Ht4H **^.rH tW *4H **H **H «-*H «*H **H *^H 






•piBpuB^g 



*q.uaunpag 



•^iptqanx 



1-IHtHrHHHflHH«NHMNC<IIMHT-IHl-IHHH 
+5 -J -p +J +S -|-J +3 4 J -p +J +i ■+» -P +i +i -r= -P -P += -P +J -P -1J 

_ bfi_ M_ bfl_ M # bfl_ M_ 60 M bD_ bfi_ M M_ M_ M bC_ M M_ bC_ bfl_ bfi_ ^ ttf bfl 
Doro^'m^cnaioQwoaojooaQaJOJooinajrn'S'xai'cQ 

> >>*>> ^ > >> >>">> >W >V r>* > > > > 



+3 +3 -P +3 •*-> 

bfi bD bfl bl) bfl 



^ J J 



+3 -P +3 -P -p +3 



'ro'm'S'ro'M 2 9 Q"w S'w 9*« S^ 2 S^"™ <» tn'ro'oQ 
ooo.o.o.o.oo 



'uoi%od\\o^ jo a^Q 



•jeqranjsi 



•^MiHioNH'jQONtoiooioinafflatoNN-oo© 



l-H rH t» T-H rH 



<M rH fM rH 



« d'ii tH r. rn' (H* >> >> g g >. >. fcO bfl "g. £5. +i > > C5 © 



OO^Ot-MOOMINNrHHOffiOOONMOtecDtOH 
COOO)t-'«JICOHe<3NNNt-.Ttl05©ClOCi50NNOOlO 
ffiOOOWtOOOOINiONOMtDOTllOOHMNHMffl© 
000005OSOi0>OOOO'H'HrH(MININMMmTtlr)lT)l»JI 
(NINNINNINCOMCOMmMMMCOCOCOroMeOCOeOeO 



182 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



o 

cc 

ft? 

I 






fe a 



CO 

© 

•to 

e 

8 






8 

•<S> 






OS 
CM 

6 

w 

m 
3 



•ssaupjtjjj 



•amaoinQ 



■** 


CO 


eo 


•«* 


o 


•>* 


T*< 


co 


o 


T* 


y-l 


eo 


eo 


eo 


CO 

eo 


o 
eo 


o 
eo 


CO 

eo 


eo 


CO 

eo 


co 
eo 


*-* 
eo 


o 
eo 


oo 

CM 


eo 


eo 
eo 



papuadsng 



•paAjossiQ 



"iwjoj, 



•33JJ 



s 



CM -H -H 



00 oo 

OS iH 

O "t 



H O • 
P * fc 
Q ^ O 

M > >H 

p;g« 



•uopmSj 

no ssorj 



*l«*oi 



M 

o 

Q 

O 



T3 
9 

O 



o3 
•♦^ 

0) 
bfl 
0) 



.Q 
o3 

0> 
bfl 


> 



a 
d 

c3 

0)0)0)010)01010 



s ta 



*-* i~J jj, I") ■ ~» ■ ~» ■ ~> j_> _i_3 , -i ■ ■* 



3 .3 -^ 






Q 



fa 



c5 
fa 



08 

fa 



e a a 

e3 ^'t. 

fa fa 



.0 
4 



bfl bfl > 
0) 0) 



03 

0) 
bfl 
0) 
> 



a X 





© 


0> 


o 












.O 


.O 


.Q 


a 


03 


e8 


5 


rfl 


0) 


0> 


0> 




bfl 


bit 


hi) 


0) 


0) 


0) 


0) 


u 


> 


> 


> 


► 


>} 


>i 


>> 



c3 






•S .s .s 



03 c3 03 



> > > 



C3 

fa 



► > > 



2 S ° 

•"3 03. ^ 

.SJsJ 



« 

w 



■pacpuB^g 



•^aauiipag 



•jtyipiqinj, 



bO bfl 



-d 
bfl 



A 
bfl 



A 
bfl 



A 

bfl 



,d ,d ,d 
bfl bfl bfl 



^j ojj au ou ou oi 
M co to co co co 



^3 
bfl 



A 
bfl 



>» > 



-d A 
bfl bfl 



bfl bfl 



A 
bfl 



>>>>>> 



A 
bfl 



> > 



•uorponoQ JO 8TBQ 



'jaquin^i 



^h oo eo 



i-t iH CM 



CI 



a 



>> 

03 



C3 ^? 

^5 1-9 



bfl 



CO 



o 





£ 


W5 


CM 


o 


00 


CO 


^H 


1-* 


■* 


CM 


^ 


m 


o 


C7> 


OS 


»o 


-* 


OJ 


oo 


t^ 


t^ 


CO 


CO 


> 


CO 


o 


<* 


Oi 


»o 


o 


«5 


eo 


o 


CO 


eo 




< 




OS 


o> 


C75 


o 






CM 


CO 


CO 


Tt< 


ij< 


CM 


CM 


CM 


CM 


CO 


eo 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


eo 


eo 





No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



183 



HO 

o 

HO 

o 



HO 

fe- 



es 
« 

IHO 

© 



© 



o 

CO 

6 

m 







•esaupjBjj 


tH 


•>* 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


t~ 


rt< 


© 


■* 


©1 


■* 




•OUIIOUJQ 


00 

CO 


00 

eo 


oo 

CO 


co 


CO 


CO 
CO 


oo 

CO 


00 
CO 


© 
CO 


© 

CO 


•o 

CO 


lO 1 t^ 

» ICO 








o 


co 


rf 


00 


© 


CO 


■^ 


•* 


CO 


© 


© 


© 


t^ 




Q* 

M 

o 


•papuadsng 


CO 

o 
o 


CM 

o 
© 


© 
© 


© 
© 


CM 

© 
© 


eo 

© 
© 


CM 

© 
© 


CO 

© 
© 


CM 

© 
© 


© 
© 


© 
© 


eo 
© 

© 


CM 

© 

© 




CM 


oo 


CO 


■* 


CM 


CM 


00 


-«*l 


© 


CM 


OO 


CM 


^ 






1-H 


© 


CO 




© 


1—4 




CM 


•* 


CO 


CM 


CM 


CM 


O 

s 


a 

hi 

<! 


•p9A|OSSIQ 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 
































CM 


-«*< 


© 


CM 


CM 


oo 


CM 


OO 


CM 


00 


00 


CM 


00 


3 




"* 


CO 


lO 


■«ti 


CM 


■* 


-* 


lO 


r» 


■* 


CO 


UO 


-* 


<< 




*I B *°X 






























o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


o 






CM 


CD 


© 


00 


CO 


© 


•* 


© 


rt< 


© 


CM 


CO Tfl 










© 


<M 


CM 






CO 


CM 


CO 


CM 


lO 


CM 


CM 






•oai^ 


© 


© 


© 


© 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


o 






o 


© 


o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


B 6 , 


•uo 


T^ra3j 


CO 


lO 


US 


Hi 


Ui 
CM 


»o 

00 


© 
© 


»0 

CO 






«o 

«o 


© 
«0 


© 
eo 


& ^ fc 
O ^ O 




uo eso'j 


H 


rH 


1-H 


_ 


y-t 


1—1 


t— 4 


rt 


1 


1 


1— 1 


H 


1-! 


►H > P-l 

B w <! 




































iO 


«o 


us 


© 


© 


© 


to 


>o 






s 


© 


© 


tffc « 




"I^ox 


t-~ 


t~ 


© 


00 


■«* 


© 


■** 


© 


1 


I 


iO 


© 


O 






CO 


CO 


"* 


CO 


•* 


•* 


CO 


eo 






■<* 


eo 


eo 


















T) 


































d 








>, 




>» 






















set 








^5 




pd 














6 




6 
3 




o> 

Xi 
c3 


o> 






■+3 
U 

c3 
CD 

d 




-ip 
u 

03 
CD 

d 












© 


X 
o3 


6 


6 


+3 

o 


^2 


CD* 


CD 


03 
O* 


CD* 


03 
CD 










o 
K 


pO 


■*» 


jQ 


+3 


X) 


bO 


+3 


X 


X 


.£} 


X 


X 










03 




S3 




cd 


<D 




crt 


03 


c3 


<a 


03 














CD 

> 


+3 




+3 


> 


o> 

> 


+3 


-♦3 




-ip 














a> 


a> 


CD 


o> 


CD 


o> 




o> 














bO 


bO 


> 


b() 




bf) 


bl) 


bfl 


bfl 


bfl 












> 


>> 


CO 

> 


>> 


o> 

> 


>j 


. >> 


CD 
> 


> 


CD 
> 


CD 
> 


? 














-IP 






























>> 


w 


>, 


d 


>. 


2-d 2 


>» 


>> 


>. 


>, 


>> 














a 






Qhs d 






















■*> 


-IP 




ip 


+3 


+3 


-ip 


+3 


-»j 












d 


-*3 


d 




d 


d 


d 


d 


d 


d 














































S3 




at 




(A 




sit 


ort 


03 


03 


03 






P3 

o 

Q 
O 






N 


i-l 


ta 


> 


h 


Q 


w 


fe 


P=H 


fe 


fe 


r=< 




















xi 

■*3 








>> 

X 

+3 
U 




pd 

+3 






















03 
CD 








03 
CD 




03 
CD 




























TJ 




Ti 






















T3 








d 




d 












0) 




CD 




o> 


d 

03 




CD 


o> 


03 


CD 


03 












































p2 




-O 




^5 


CD 




^2 


X 




^2 












TJ 


c3 




cd 




crt 




crt 


c3 


X 


03 


X 














j2 


-u 




+3 


^2 


s> 


•+3 


-•p 


c3 


-ip 


o3 










O 


cd 


et> 


01 




0> 


(9 




CD 


CD 


+3 


CD 


-ip 










O 


hO 




bf) 




bl) 






bn 


bl) 


CD 


bll 


CD 










o 


CD 


O 




o> 






CD 


CD 


bD 


o 


bfl 












> 


bfl 


> 




> 


bD 


bJD 


> 


> 


>> 


!> 


CD 
>• 
>> 












>> 


> 


>> 




>> 


> 


> 


>> 


>> 


>. 












a 


!» 


d 




-O 

d 


>> 


>. 


+3 

d 


+3 

d 


-f3 

d 

> 


+3 

d 


-ip 

.2 

*c3 

> 












S3 

«*-c 

[> 


•*3 

.2 


c3 


o 

d 
o 


c3 

i> 


+3 

d 


+3 

d 

03 


c3 


c3 

> 


03 

«IH 

> 








P3* 
O 

5 
o 
u 


•pjBpUB^g 


CO 

o 


CO 
© 


© 


00 

© 


© 


© 


© 


US 

© 


© 
1—1 


© 


© 

l-H 


© 


© 


B* 


ranur^'B] < j 
































IP 


•+» 


+3 


-IP 


+3 


43 


+3 


-*3 


+3 


-IP 


-f3 


-ip 






B 






pd 


pd 


pd 


,d 


XI 


^3 


Xi 


.d 


X 


J 


^3 


X 










M 


bll 


bil 


bO 


bO 


bO 


bO 


bO 


bfl 


to 


bl) 


bfl 






< 
IS 
< 
B 

-5 




•^uaunpag 


02 


<n 


oo 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 










> 


> 


> 


> 


> 


> 


> 


> 


> 


> 


> 


> 












+3 


+3 


+» 


+3 


+3 


-IP 


■*> 




-o 


















J 


pd 


X\ 


Xi 


^3 


X 


X 


X 


^3 




X 










•^ipiqjtii 


o> 
d 


bfl 
CO 


bO 
in 


CO 


tt) 

CO 


bfl 

CO 


bO 

CO 


bfl 

CO 


CO 


bfl 

CO 


<9 

d 


bfl 

GO 












£ 


> 


> 


> 


> 


!> 


> 


> 


> 


> 


fc 


> 












t« 


t~ 


© 


© 


00 


© 


© 


i—( 


oo 


© 


t^ 


•N ! 










,— ■ 






*-H 




1—1 


™ 


CM 


1— 1 


I— 1 


CM 


•^ 






•no 


[^00 


{OQ jo o»«a 


a 
4 




o3 


<5 


>> 

03 


CD 

d 

d 




bi 

d 


■*3 

a 

CD 
GO 


+3 

CD 

o 


O 


c* 

CD 

Q 












© 


00 


,_, 


© 


l>. 


^, 


00 


W3 


■«*< 


,_, 


•* 


© 












o 


lO 




OS 




."H 




Ol 




© 


© 


CO 


> 

< 






•jaqum^j 


oo 
oo 


OS 


CD 
© 


o 
© 


co 
© 


CO 


t^ 


CO 
CM 


CM 

CO 


CO 
CO 












CM 


CM 


CM 


CO 


CO 


CO 


eo 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


eo 




I 



184 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



<3 

o 
O 



I. 

S 1 

•o o 

M 8. 



** to 

•c-a 

5 



CO 

6 
w 

PQ 

«* 







•ssaupiBTT 


*a 


r~ 


t^ 


t>. 


lO 


HO 


CO 


co 


CO 


lO 


"3 1 


iO 










CM 


CM 


cm 


CM 


CM 


cM 


CM 


CM 


CM 


CM 


CM | 


CM 




•saiJOiqO 


co 


«o 


o 
oo 




CM 


CM 


CM 


o 


o 


CM 




CO 










CM 


OO 


o 


o 


CO 


CM 


CM 


00 


oo 


CO 


■^ 


<M 










HO 


iO 


■^ 


CO 


CO 


CO 


Tt< 


CM 


C5 


00 


CO 


m 






Q 

o 


•papusdsng 


o 

o 


o 
o 


o 
o 


o 


o 
o 


o 
o 


O 

o 


o 
o 


o 
o 


o 
o 


O 
O 


o 

o 






•"+1 


00 


CD 


CO 


•* 


CM 


o 


00 


•* 


o 


"*l 


CM 








t~ 


t~ 


OS 


iO 


C33 


t>- 


OO 


t^ 


o 


OS 


00 


00 




H 

o 


3 


•p9A]OSSIQ 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


1—1 

o 


CM 

o 


o 


o 


o 
































2 




CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


o 


■^ 


CM 


CO 


CM 


CO 


00 


■^ 




g 




CM 


CO 


CO 


i-H 


CO 


o 


CM 


o 


o 


t^ 




CO 




< 




•I^oj, 


CM 


CM 


CM 


CM 


CM 


CM 


CM 


CM 


CO 


CM 


CM 


CM 






O 


o 


o 


o 


o 


O 


O 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 






CO 


CM 


T* 


(M 


oo 


00 


CM 


CM 


o 


o 


CM 


_< 








l>- 


CM 


CO 


00 






O0 


CM 


CM 


CM 


r~ 


»o 






•oeitf 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 




o 






o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


© 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 




H O . 


•UOT^TUSj 


o 
oo 




uo 
© 


CM 


U0 


o 
o 


"3 




CO 






CO 




£ 5j ^ 


no sscr[ 


_; 


CM 


CO 


CM 


CM 


CM 


CM 


1 


CM 


1 


I 


CM 




M t> g 
































Irt 


»» 


U0 


O 


id 


*a 


o 




"0 






CM 




tf£« 


•p3 + 0£ 


00 


CO 


t^ 


O 


CM 


•^ 


o 


1 


■<tl 


1 


l 


l>» 




O 




U0 


CO 


t^ 


1^ 


t^. 


CO 


r~ 




CO 






CO 














1 

m 












rd 
















e3 

(4 
















CO 

"+3 
















3 




ft 












0) 

en 
















a 




3 


























u 

CD 




a 




6 


6 


0) 


a* 


d 














J* 


.Q 


£> 




> 


^ 


Si 


S 


s> 


03 












o 




Si 


S3 


a 


3 


3 


+3 


03 

•*3 


03 

+3 

0) 


03 

+3 

0) 


o 

3 


CD 

3 










d 

3 
o 


O 


o 


OJ 


o3 


bD 


bl) 


bD 


bl) 


<^ 














3 


3 


bfl 


bC 


> 


> 




> 


+3 

<D 
bfl 


<D 

■w, 












3 


>, 


I>1 


a> 


> 


>, 


>, 


>^ 


>, 


ca 


CD 

> 




























> 














+3 


-(J 








+3 


+3 


+3 














>> 


o 


t> 


>, 


>j 


O 


o 


o 


o 


>, 


>i 












+3 


a 


1 


+3 


+3+3 


d 


d 


d 


d 


+3 


+3 












a 


+3 


+3 


d 


d d 


+3 


+3 


+3 


+3 


d 


d 




















c3'5 


















































o 

Q 

O 




PM 


« 





Eh 


Ph 


M 


« 


Q 


Q 


to 


Ph 
















i 

d 












i 

+3 

Q 




















d 












CD 
















e3 




T3 












en 
















3 




d 

c3 












•0 

d 














03 


>> 




a> 












c3 


CD 










"O 


Si 
o3 




CD 


03 
-P 


(D 


o 


CU 


<D 


V 


3 


03 












■P 


£i 


,t> 


X! 


^2 


U3 


Si 


.Q 


+3 

CD 
bD 


+3 










o 


bD 


a 


a 


bfi 

> 


03 

+3 


03 

+3 


03 

+3 


o3 

+3 


03 

+3 


bD 










CD 


-i 


s 


0) 


cu 


CU 


a> 


V 


CD 












> 


o 


o 


. bD 


bi) 


bl) 


bD 


bD 


> 


> 














1 


3 


5 


+3 <C 


CJ 


a> 


<D 


<D 














*+3 




o 


d > 

03 ■>. 




> 
>> 


> 
>> 


> 


>> 

+3 


>> 

+3 

d 


















OS 4^ 
























+3 


-*a 


03 


+3 


+3 


+3 


+3 


















a 


d 


i d 


d 


d 


d 


d 


03-C.i 




















ft' 3 


























crt 


cS 




03 


03 


03 


03 
















> 


to 


\* 


> 


Pm 


h 


Ph 


to 


Ph 


> 


t> 













•pj^pu^g 


OJ 


CO 


CO 


oo 

CM 


o 

CO 


CO 
CM 


CM 


CM 


o 

CM 


oo 


CM 


CM 




H 


o 
o 


UinUT^'B| ( J 










































+3 


+3 


+3 


+3 


+3 








o 
















Si 


si 


A 


Si 


,^J 








§ 




-t-> 


+3 


+3 


-f3 


+3 


+3 


bl) 


bl) 


bl) 


bfl 


bfl 








•^aaunpag 


.d 


.d 


Xi 


^3 


,d 


-d 


















« 




bO 


bll 


bD 


bll 


bD 


bn 


in 


to 


m 


en 


0) 








41 


































CQ 


W 


02 


m 


02 


02 


> 


f> 


> 


> 


> 










+» 


+3 


-tJ 


■*3 


+3 


+3 




+3 


•*3 


■f» 


+3 












J3 


J 


^3 


^a 


^3 


x\ 




Si 


^3 


S) 


^3 












bD 


bD 


bfl 


hfl 


bD 


bD 




bD 


bfl 


bfl 


bfl 










•Aiptqjnx 


0) 


V) 


CO 


'in 


In 


"m 


6 
d 


CO 


"m 


CO 


"m 












> 


> 


> 


> 


> 


> 


J5 


> 


t> 


> 


> 












uo 


- 


- 


•* 


CM 


U0 


id 


00 


i— i 


r-~ 


CM 
cM 








'UOl 


* 09 Il°0 i° Q i*a 


c3 

•-5 


3 
CD 

pH 


(J 

VH 

r-. 


ft 

<5 


03 


d 

3 


>> 

•-9 


fc*D 

d 


■<-» 

ft 


+3 
O 

o 


O 












o 


CJ 


CM 


o 


CO 


CO 


0O 


<35 


CM 


»-H 


co 










t^ 


O 


>f5 


CM 


OS 


»<0 


CO 




00 






> 






•jaquin^ 


co 

O0 


<35 


"0 


O 

O 


O 


o 


CO 


CM 


o 

CO 


CO 


•** 


< 








CM 


(M 


CM 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 









































No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



185 



8 

© 

•to 

co 

© 

co 
© 

© 

•hi 
© 

<*2 
© 






© 

•fc, - 

$ I 

© o 



CO 

© 

*c>3 

■♦o 

© 
•<s> 



C3 

i~o 

© 
© 



© 



CO 

6 

H 

« 
< 



PL, 











CO 


•41 


CO 


CO 


co 


rH 


■* 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


co 


■* 








•ssaupxBjj 


































OS 


CO 


O 


00 


CO 


00 


00 


cs 


CO 


CO 


•* 





CO 






•amioxqo 


CM 


CO 


■* 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


co 


CO 


CO 










00 


00 


CM 





CO 





CM 





CM 


-<* 





CO 


CO 






ft 

o 


•papuadsng 


o 
o 


CO 

o 
o 


CM 

O 
O 


CM 
O 


CM 

O 
O 


CM 

O 

O 


CO 









CM 
O 
O 






<— 1 






r- 1 






CM 
O 
O 






CM 


00 


00 


-* 


^*» 


•itl 


00 


-* 


O 


CO 


CO 


CM 


t>. 








CO 


OO 


OS 


C5 


O 


O 


»— 1 


-*l 


CO 


y-t 




1— 1 


O 




<1 


s 

n 
3 


•paApssTQ 


o 

o 


o 
o 






O 
O 


O 


O 











O 





O 


O 




S 




o 


CO 





TX 


O 


Tt< 





•* 


CM 


O 


CO 


00 


CO 




§ 




•41 


CM 


CM 




CO 


CM 


>o 


10 


10 


CO 


CM 


CM 


CO 




<i 




"I^oj, 






i—l 




*H 










1— I 






1— I 






o 


© 


O 


O 


O 


O 

















O 









CM 


O 


•* 


O0 


CO 


■* 


■* 





■<* 


00 


00 


O 


CO 












CO 







O 












y— 1 


CM 








eaijl 


o 


o 





O 





O 

















O 









o 


o 





O 





O 

















O 







H O . 
P Pj !z; 
Q O O 


•UOT^IUSj 


o 

CO 


US 

CO 


U3 




O 
CO 




O 
O 


«5 

T-l 










O 
00 


00 




ao seofj 


1—1 


rH 


1— 1 


_; 


CM 


CM 


CO 


1 


1 


1 


1 


i—l 


,_; 




M > M 
00 fV] H 


































»o 


O 


Hi 


*r> 


O 


*a 


O 










"2 


CO 




tf g« 


•i^+o'x 


o 


CO 


<M 


"5 


T* 


CM 


OS 


1 


1 


1 


1 


»fl> 


U5 




O 




•* 


-* 


CO 


•<*< 


«5 


1* 


It3 










* 


■*' 










© 










© 






1 


















Xi 










^2 




















43 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 




© 


© 












43 






























o 

w 


X2 


X 


^2 


.O 


^2 




x> 


^2 


1 


U2 


^2 










c3 




crt 


01 


<Jl 


ci 




01 


OS 




est 


C3 














© 

> 


+3 


42 


43 


+3 


© 


43 






43 


43 












© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 




© 


© 












bfl 


bfl 


bfl 


bfl 


bl) 


bl) 


bl) 




bl) 


bfl 












© 


>> 

o 


© 


© 


© 


© 


43 
O 


© 


© 




© 


© 












> 


> 


> 


> 


> 


> 


> 




> 


> 












>> 


>> 


>, 


>> 


>> 


>> 


>> 




>. 


>> 














a 










ft 






















43 


+3 


4i 


43 


43 


43 


43 




43 


43 












C5 


+» 


ft 


a 


a 


ft 


43 





.a 




a 


ft 








































K 
O 
Q 

C 




03 




a 


crt 


crt 


crt 




ct 


ej 




Cj 


rt 










* 


A 


Uh 


fe 


\* 


Ph 


P. 


h 


1*1 




[*< 


f*l 




























1 












- 








© 


© 




© 




© 


© 




©' 


©" 


















































.ft 


J2 




XJ 




^ 


^2 




J2 


X> 










T3 






c3 


ci 




ert 




at 


etl 




ai 


a 












J2 


.O 


43 


+3 


,0 


43 


j:5 


43 


43 




43 


43 










O 


o3 


c3 


© 


© 


^ 


© 




© 


© 




© 


© 










U 


43 


•+3 


bl) 


bll 




bl) 




bll 


bfl 




bl) 


bfl 










© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 


© 




© 


© 












bfl 


bl) 


> 


t> 


bll 


> 


bl) 


> 


> 




> 


> 












CD 
> 


£ 


>> 


>» 


© 
> 


t» 


© 


>> 


>» 




>. 


>> 












>> 


>> 


43 

ft 


+3 

a 


t» 


43 
ft 


>» 


43 
ft 


43 
ft 




43 
ft 


43 
ft 




. 










































ft 

'8 
ft 


.a 

c3 


at 




ft 

'8 


S3 


ft 

'8 


C3 


«+4 


1 


03 














t> 


> 


^ 


> 


> 




> 


^ 










O 


•piBpUB^g 


CM 


»— 1 
CM 


O 
CM 


O 

CM 




CM 


O 

CM 


CM 
CM 


l-H 

CM 


OO 


CO 
t— 1 


CO 


CM 


00 

1— I 




a 


H 

o 
o 


xunui^jj; 
































43 


43 


+» 


49 


49 


43 


43 


43 


43 


43 


43 


43 








o 




A 


rft 


-ft 


XI 


rft 


^3 


rft 


^ 


■ft 


,ft 


^3 


,ft 








a 




bfl 


bl) 


bll 


bll 


bl) 


bl) 


bfl 


bl) 


bfl 


bfl 


bll 


bfl 








3 

ft 


•^uaraipag 


CO 


09 


CO 


m 


3} 


00 


<n 


en 


OQ 


co 


CO 


en 








1 




> 


> 


> 


> 


> 


f> 


>• 


> 


> 


> 


> 


> 










43 


-f» 


4» 


4» 


43 


43 


43 


43 


43 


43 


43 














.ft 


X 


.ft 


,ft 


A 


^3 


XX 


^a 


^a 


X 


^3 


X 












bfl 


bfl 


bfl 


bfl 


bfl 


bfl 


bfl 


bfl 


bl) 


bfl 


bfl 


bfl 










•^ipiqjnx 


in 


"m 


"a! 


la 


In 


'in 


in 


m 


en 


"m 


tn 


CO 












> 


> 


> 


t> 


> 


> 


> 


> 


> 


> 


> 


> 












CO 


r~ 




CO 


»— t 


CO 


CO 


^ 


lO 


CM 


CM 


■<*i 








•uoi 


^oanoQ jo a^a 


ft 

•4 


X 


c8 


ft 
< 


>> 

c3 


© 
ft 

ft 

»-5 




bi) 

ft 

< 


43 

ft 
© 


43 

O 
O 


O 


6 

© 

Q 












OS 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


OS 


CO 


Cs 


t^- 


CO 


00 












OS 


O 


CM 


00 


10 


10 


00 


■* 


■>* 




CO 


CO 


> 

< 






•joqcan^j 


1A 
OO 


OS 


OS 


C5 


"41 
O 





10 


CO 
CM 


OS 

CM 


10 

CO 


CO 


CO 










CM 


CM 


CM 


CM 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 




CO 


CO 


CO 







186 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



CO 



CO 

o 






o 






CO 



S3 

O 



V^ 00 

*- 03 
.£ ft. 



£ 



CO 

© 



e 

£ 



CO 

CD 
©i 

© 

CD 

Si 



CO 

CO 

6 

H 

n 
< 



•ssaupj^jj 



•auuofqQ 



o>c^oooc^i^evicoeoTt<eoT*<eoe > ^TtieocN»-^eoiocococO'*"<*i-<*'«5 

OO'^'^'HMIOlHl-IHlHlHlHrtrtlHiHi-IHHNNt-li-IHHHH 



o 

p. 
< 



•papuadsng 



•paAjossiQ 



"I^ox 



•98J.I 



CO Ci C3 t~ CO ■**< O Oi CO CO CO OO lO eO -h C<) lO — < 00 c>3 OO CO --I* t-- O CO CO 

CN .-I CN *-H «-H Oi -H(NN(NM(N(NMMM(NM(N>ni(5-H(N(N>-llN'H 

oooooo ooo o oo oooo o oo oooo o ooo 

oooooo ooooo o oo o oo o oooo o oooo 



NNM<«lON ONMMOO!>flCS«Oi»tONNM>0<*'HfflNOO 
TfHHOO!* HNHrtMOSOONNHOOrtClJOOeSINHNHOO) 

oooooo ooooooooooooooooooooo 



lC(OtCO'HtD^C»»He))!D<ONON'i*(MtOt^O'l''H'HOOC»lOM'H 

»^»^^H»^.^eO'^'^<^'^'^'-ieocvic<icocsic<icNeNic-ic<i<->T-i»-i'— ihh 
oooooooooooooooooooooooooooo 



NNCSMteODINNtOplCllNONTllOOONtOOSi-lCOCOO'tCDWOO 

^H-H.^c^'^^e^rHC^c^c^^TjHc^eocNic^c^^ioioiocoeviCNj^H^-io 

OOOOO00OOOOOOOOOO oooooo oooooo 
oooooooooooooooooooooooooooo 



o 2 



•uopiu3i 



uo ssoq; 



'F^ox 



HrtlHlHHIO rtiHiHrHrHCOHNMNiHINNNN' 



co coeoeo coco ^00 0000-* eo co rtiTjdOT^TtiiOTticot^eocoeo^ ■"*!■* 



o 

o 



•paBpue^g 



3 
3 
u 

5 
»-5 



i?i?^?,b^? 

+J +J *J -U +J 

d d d d d .......... 

ooogo j£ j£ j£ j£>!,£? ^ ji> j^i? ^^?^?^? ^ii> ,£>,£? j?j£ ,£> j? j? 

.i.il. r ll.rt.i->- 3 -w+-'-t^-t-^*-'-*^-^-t^-t-^-t-'-<-^-<-J-w-fJ-^>-t-'+-'-<-'-tJ-^-^'+J 

ccdddddddddddddddddddddddddd 
SfiBS £00000000000000000000000 



. . . .« . . . . -^ -T . . • .... 

v- *»* § s 

- Dfl fl «S cS O 

rt « 5 a> - ~ T3 3 

.£3.8 J§J 11^ 3 J . . .| 

: Sfl'fl'S'-§^ COCO gg <ncsT 

3 -.3 ►* ►* * J2 J3 j£! d d 2 Sooo „ « « ** r n ce <a ® » 5, en <s ej 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



187 



Table No. 34. 



Chemical Examinations of Water from a Faucet in Boston, 
from 1892 to 1916. 

[Parts per 100,000.] 











Color. 


Residue on 
Evaporation. 


Ammonia. 


6 
a 
'Z 

3 
O 


T3 

© 

s 

m 

a 
o 
o 


o 
u 

i 

O 






T3 
u 
03 

S 
3 03 

.5 02 
-P 


*o3 
+> 
O 

H 


a 

.2 

'-2 

'3 

BO 

m 
O 


o 


ALBUMINOID. 




Year. 


*o3 
■*» 
O 

H 


© 

> 

DQ 
DD 

s 


T3 
O 

a 

a> 
a 
ra 

3 
02 


m 
m 

a 

u 

o3 

K 


1892, .... 


.37 


4.70 


1.67 


.0007 


.0168 


.0138 


.0030 


.41 


- 


1.9 


1893, 








.53 


4.54 


1.84 


.0010 


.0174 


.0147 


.0027 


.38 


.60 


1.8 


1894, 








.58 


4.64 


1.83 


.0006 


.0169 


.0150 


.0019 


.41 


.63 


1.7 


1895, 








.59 


4.90 


2.02 


.0006 


.0197 


.0175 


.0022 


.40 


.69 


0.7 


1896, 








.45 


4.29 


1.67 


.0005 


.0165 


.0142 


.0023 


.37 


.56 


1.4 


1897, 








.55 


4.82 


1.84 


.0009 


.0193 


.0177 


.0016 


.40 


.64 


1.6 


1898, . 








.40 


4.19 


1.60 


.0008 


.0152 


.0136 


.0016 


.29 


.44 


1.4 


1899, . 








.28 


3.70 


1.30 


.0006 


.0136 


.0122 


.0014 


.24 


.35 


1.1 


1900, . 








.29 


3.80 


1.20 


.0012 


.0157 


.0139 


.0018 


.25 


.38 


1.3 


1901, 








.29 


4.43 


1.64 


.0013 


.0158 


.0142 


.0016 


.30 


.42 


1.7 


1902, 








.30 


3.93 


1.56 


.0016 


.0139 


.0119 


.0020 


.29 


.40 


1.3 


1903, 








.29 


3.98 


1.50 


.0013 


.0125 


.0110 


.0015 


.30 


.39 


1.5 


1904, 








.23 


3.93 


1.59 


.0023 


.0139 


.0121 


.0018 


.34 


.37 


1.5 


1905, 








.24 


3.86 


1.59 


.0020 


.0145 


.0124 


.0021 


.35 


.35 


1.4 


1906, 








.24 


3.86 


1.39 


.0018 


.0159 


.0134 


.0025 


.34 


.36 


1.3 


1907, 








.22 


3.83 


1.40 


.0013 


.0129 


.0109 


.0020 


.33 


.32 


1.3 


1908, 








.19 


3.50 


1.35 


.0011 


.0115 


.0092 


.0024 


.33 


.26 


1.2 


1909, 








.18 


3.46 


1.43 


.0011 


.0128 


.0103 


.0025 


.28 


.25 


1.3 


1910, 








.14 


3.05 


1.24 


.0013 


.0118 


.0102 


.0016 


.28 


.22 


1.1 


1911, 








.25 


4.18 


1.66 


. 0015 


.0156 


.0128 


.0029 


.38 


.33 


1.4 


1912, 








.17 


3.86 


1.23 


.0018 


.0154 


.0119 


.0034 


.36 


.29 


1.7 


1913, 








.13 


3.96 


1.15 


.0014 


.0150 


.0120 


.0026 


.35 


.26 


1.5 


1914, 








.14 


4.12 


1.19 


.0014 


.0138 


.0116 


.0022 


.39 


.25 


1.4 


1915, 








.16 


37.3 


1.04 


.0015 


.0157 


.0134 


.0023 


.38 


.25 


1.4 


1916, 








.18 


4.53 


1.85 


.0013 


.0133 


.0107 


.0026 


.36 


- 


1.4 



188 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 





•J « 

3 a 












































< o 
w > 




5 

c3 


o 


CO 


t~ 


io 


0O 


t- 


*a 


t~ 


OS 


l-l 


00 


kO 


■«* 


t^ 


o 


"* 


OS 


US 


00 




OS 


CS 


CO 


o 


OS 


CM 


t^ 


"* 


t» 


CO 


o 


i*< 


lO 


OS 


OS 


OS 


oo 


CN 


"tf 




W K 


CO 


CO 


"* 


t~ 


1—1 


CO 


eo 


l-H 


CM 


OS 


t~ 


Tt* 


l-H 


eo 


eo 


■* 




CO 


l-H 




& H 


S 










































►5 H 


3 














• 




























^Ph 












































5 « 












































° a 












































H O 


3 


>* 


id 


o 


o 


oo 


T-l 


CO 


o 


"5 


CO 


CO 


■^ 


t^ 


t^ 


CO 


oo 


us 


•«* 


(«. 




fc > 


->*i 




oo 


US 


00 


eo 


O 


"*l 


t^ 


CO 




OS 


oo 


us 




OS 


CN 


00 


^* 




ti K 


cs 


t--. 


cs 


tH 


us 


CM 




CM 


•* 


eo 


US 


CM 


eo 


■* 


"5 


CN 


eo 


CN 


CO 




W a 


(H 










































P< cfl 


3 










































o a 


in 










































Wtf 








. 








































oS 












































* ? 


«*H 


CO 


t- 


o 


•>* 


o 


eo 


CO 


OS 


i—i 


oo 


OS 


eo 


CO 


CM 


US 


"* 


t» 


o 


US 






co 


ifi> 


OS 


■* 


us 


<M 


lO 


O0 


CO 


t~ 


OS 


o 


CM 


OS 


CO 




(N 


US 


CN 




CN 


eo 


eo 


CM 


*o 


eo 


i— i 


CM 


Tt< 


eo 


CO 


CO 


•"* 


US 


CO 


■«* 


CO 


■>* 


-* 




CO CO 


3 










































< H 


te 










































rt 












































a 












































•< « 


,4 










































Wo • 

8° N 




«0 


00 


»o 


OS 


•>* 


OS 


■*»« 


O0 


CO " 


"3 


>o 


o 


CO 


oo 


r-l 


eo 


1 


1 


1 




9 


■«*< 




CO 


->*< 


o 


CO 


lr^ 


»o 


CN 


o 


CM 


1—4 


CO 


I>1 


■* 


US 










Sg o 


CN 


CN 


eo 


1H 


CM 


«-• 


i— i 


l-l 


CM 


CM 


t- 


CO 


■* 


eo 


CM 


CN 










■ 










































r K Pn 


3 










































s ^ 












































•« « 












































w o . 


5 


O 


o 


us 


CO 


C~ 


os 


\a 


W3 


CM 


eo 


cM 


CM 


Ui 


o 


oo 


O 


CN 


_ 


t^ 






OS 


-tfl 


•<n 


CO 


CM 


US 


t>- 


CO 


OS 


i—i 


CO 


t^ 


US 


•<* 


00 


CO 


CO 


o 


eo 




S co Z 


CO 


"* 


CO 


eo 


CO 


•*< 


■* 


V} 


CO 


■* 


OS 


CO 


•>* 


l-H 


oo 


US 


us 


l>- 


00 




























CM 




l-l - 














<< a 


GO 
























































































a 


CO 




T-t 


CM 


© 


US 


CM 


eo 


co 


o 


l-H 


00 


eo 


CO 


eo 


CN 


o» 


eo 


OS 




H 


o 


OS 




t^ 


O 


CO 


OS 


■*t< 


o 


T»H 


o 


** 


OS 


CO 




r^ 


CN 


00 




rf< 






o 




o 


1^ 


t» 


t- 


»o 


»o 


1—1 


CM 


CM 




o 


CM 


oo 


eo 




CN 


OS 














































„ ^ 


o 






*— 1 












»— 1 


i— 1 


i— 1 


l-H 


1-t 


CM 


l^ 


t^ 


■* 


eo 








pq 




















































































■3-H 

o 


s 




US 


oo 


CM 


tH 


T— 1 


CO 


"3 


t* 


eo 


OS 


CM 


oo 


CM 


CM 


•>* 


CO 


o 


00 




.3 




o 


US 


OS 


I~- 


CO 


CO 


iO 


o 


CM 


lO 


"Ct« 


<M 


■<# 


00 


CO 


CO 


o 


o 










t^ 


os 


o 


OS 


CO 


CM 


■<*< 


l-H 


lO 


1—4 


OS 


OS 


CO 


OS 


o 


OS 


t>. 




U 












































3 






l-H 




1—1 






i-t 


l-l 


T^ 


I— 1 


l-H 




l-H 


■«*< 


-<*< 


CN 


l-H 


CN 






CQ 





















































>o 


CM 


oo 


CO 


CM 


■* 


cs 


*ti 


eo 


CO 


00 


CM 


l-H 


<M 


oo 


<N 






o 






CO 


CM 


o 


OO 


t~- 


O 






00 




lO 


oo 


oo 


tH 


OS 


CN 


OS 




nB 






CN 


eo 


CM 


Tt* 


eo 


eo 


»o 


t>. 


■«* 


oo 


>o 


US 


OS 


oo 


iO 


CO 


oo 


OS 














































« o 


o 










































PQ « 


PQ 




















































































t, CO 


8 


^ 


o 


oo 


^ 


o 


OS 


t^ 


■^ 


eo 


eo 


o 


** 


3 


o 


OS 


eo 


us 


US 


O 




.S 




»>. 


OS 


CO 


OS 


■«J* 




•<*< 


"5 


i—i 


»o 


r^ 


OS 


CO 


us 


eo 


o 


eo 






CO 


■«*< 


«# 


eo 


"5 


us 


U3 


CO 


OS 


U9 


oo 


•># 


^J< 


OS 


OS 


US 


t^ 


o 


OS 






3 
























CM 












f-H 








02 












































a 






| 


1 


I 




I 


CM 


CM 


CM 


CO 


t^ 


oo 


00 


oo 


o 


C3S 


eo 


O 






I 
















OS 


t» 




CO 


CO 


CM 


CO 


CO 


t» 


O 


us 


us 




hS 
















>o 


CM 


CM 


■* 


OS_ 


CO 


eo 


eo 


CM 


eo 


CO 


US 




a o 


O 
























»— ' 


















CO > 

I 3 « 


PQ 










































6 










































U CO 

< a 


« . 






| 


1 


| 


1 


CO 


OS 


CO 


«5 


l-H 




o 


OS 


US 


OS 


eo 


OS 


CN 




M 
















CO 


3 


CM 


CO 


»o 


oo 


3 


oo 


T}l 


us 


!-< 


CN 




£« 


u 
3 














CO 


t>- 


■<* 


t» 


CM* 


•»*» 


us 


T»< 


t~ 


US 


OS 






0Q 










































M 












































3 












































H 












































^ 
















' 
































00 


CI 


o 




CM 


CO 


•>«< 


lO 


CO 


t- 


oo 


OS 


o 




CN 


eo 


■^ 


us 


CO 








o 


C5 » O 


o 


O 


o 


o 


o 


o 


O 


o 


o 




l-H 










l-H 








00 


O0 


OS 


OS 


OS 


OS 


OS 


OS 


OS 


OS 


OS 


OS 


OS 


OS 


OS 


OS 


OS 


OS 


OS 



a 
o> 

B 

O 

a 



en 



No. 57.} 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



189 





d 












































2- c ' 2 


I 


1 


1 


1 


1 


| 


© 


co 


CM 


CM 


1—1 


t^ 


■* 


T-l 


CM 


CO 


CM 


© 


© 
















oo 


00 


CM 


CM 


00 


t>- 


t^- 


CD 


CO 


us 






CM 
















i— 1 


eo 


■* 


TH 


■"* 


CO 


eo 


•^ 


■* 


eo 


-* 


■«*• 


US 




Ol-H © 










































£ <° 










































a 










































U 0> 

2 I?- 2 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


■* 


eo 


CO 


US 


eo 


eo 


T— (-' 


OS 


CM 


t^. 


os 


CM 


© 
















t» 


CO 


CM 


o 


■<* 




CM 


^ 




eo 


■* 


© 


o 
















CM 


eo 


eo 


CM 


•«« 


eo 


CM 


eo 


■>* 


CM 


CM 


CM 


■>* 




























i—i 


















55 m 








































oi 










































21 ' 


















































































H 


d 










































^ _ © 

©,d © 


I 




CM 


o 


1—1 


OO 


© 


i—i 


eo 


t>. 


us 


OS 


i— , 


us 


W 


© 


OS 


i— ( 


oo 






o 


us 


OO 


US 


© 


t^ 


t^ 


oo 


CM • 


OS 


US 


CM 


eo 


CO 




-<t" 


eo 


us 




£•-"> 




CM 


■* 


CM 


•* 


eo 


"*. 


CO 


"3 


•* . 


CO 


OS_ 


■* 


t~ 


OS 


^ 


«o 


© 


00 




§«©• 
























^ 


















£ M 










































d' 










































in © 


o 


<M 


oo 


eo 


t^ 


CO 


eo 


00 


© 


CM 


CO 


eo 


b- 


00 


US 


T ( 


eo 


r^ 


CM 




2 £.2 

■^ o > ■ 


eo 


© 


CO 


•* 


eo 


00 


o 


<M 


US 




CO 




■<* 


!>. 


eo 


eo 


© 


© 


!>• 




CM 


1— 1 


•** 


CM 


eo 


CM 


eo 


US 


US 


eo 


CO 


OS_ 


•* 


t» 


o 


us 


© 


us 


0O 




dHlg 
























i-T 






l-( 












S M 










































H 












































H 83 












































* 5 
« 2 


. . 


■<* 


© 


t~ 


eo 


us 


us 


CM 


■^ 


,_, 


OS 


OS 


OS 


US 


■* 


OS 


© 


© 


i— i 


1—1 




CM 


O 


CM 


© 




CM 


eo 


t-~ 


US 


CM 




00 


OS 


CO 


US 




us 


-<*< 


© 


•^ 




P w 


d 
55 


eo 


eo 


oo 


•* 


US 


•* 


** 


U3 


t^ 


tH 


CO 


oq_ 
i— i 


** 


OS 


OS 


oo 


us 


CO 


© 


o 


Be, ^ 










































> 


H 3 










































<A 


o 










































H 
03 






















































































H 


w =: 










































;« 


H 


. 


■<*i 


CM 


OS 


t* 


t~ 


© 


oo 


•* 


CM- 


OS 


eo 


CM 


1 


CM 


b- 


CM 


1 


1 


1 




4^ 


■<*< 


© 


eo 


OS 


eo 


CO 


eo 


o 


^ 


o 


t-- 


eo 




OO 


00 


CM 








5 d 
W P 

13 


© 

la 


»o 


© 




CO 


Oi 


00 


oo 


Oi 


o 


OS 


o 
^1 


CO 




eo 
i-h" 


00 

eo 


CO 

cm" 








p 






















































































H 












































CO 


p 5 










































w 


© 
i— t 


■«* 


© 


oo 


3 


eo 


o 


us 


^H 


i-t 


o> 


eo 


OS 


t^ 


o 


us 


to 


CM 


eo 


CM 


o 


us 


CO 


CO 


US 


© 


US 


CO 


->*i 


oo 


OS 


US 


© 


us 


eo 


OS 


-* 


■* 


o 


eo 


eo 


«o 


eo 


us 


■* 


•«*" 


us 


CO 


eo 


fr- 


Os_ 


** 


t~ 


00 


us 


■* 


CD 


oo 


d 

o 










































© 
© 


us 


© 


eo 


00 


1—1 


© 


us 


a> 


1—1 


o 


T- 1 


OS 


CM 


00 


CO 


tr- 


oo 


© 


,_, 


OO 


cm 


i^. 


CM 


OO 


«5 


CO 


o 


^- 


OS 


•<* 


t^ 


CM 


TJH 


!-* 


© 


rj< 


>o 




Ph 


■>* 


^ 


"5 


CO 


US 


CO 


"* 


CO 


CO 


»o 


t>l 


o 


CO 


t- 


l>- 


CO 


CO 


© 


O0 


H 


3 




i-T 




















1— , 
















O 
fa 


W. 








































CO 






















































































© 
u 


l 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


eo 


eo 


o> 


OS 


us 


■«*< 


t» 


us 


t-» 


»o 


t^ 


















00 


■^ 


t^ 


OS 


CM 


eo 




CO 


US 


CM 


US 


CO « 


















t- 


■^ 


OS 


eo 


CO 


OS 


rH 


US 


t~ 


t- 


CO 


u 

a 
























CM 






^-1 










ti 




















































1 






























« 








































«1 








































H 








































5* 










































00 


© 


o 




CM 


eo 


Tt< 


US 


co 


t>- 


00 


OS 


O 


^H 


CM 


eo 


■* 


US 


CO 




© 


OS 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 






















00 


00 


© 


OS 


OS 


os 


o> 


OS 


OS 


OS 


OS 


OS 


OS 


OS 


OS 


OS 


OS 


OS 


OS 



190 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



Table No. 36. — Number of Bacteria per Cubic Centimeter in Water from Vari- 
ous Parts of the Metropolitan Water Works, from 1898 to 1916 inclusive. 

[Averages of weekly determinations.] 













Chestnut Hill Reservoir. 


Southern Service Taps. 


Yeak. 


Sudbury 
Aqueduct 
Terminal 
Chamber. 


Cochituate 
Aqueduct. 


Effluent 

Gate-house 

No. 2. 


Low Service, 

180 Boylston 

Street. 


High Service, 

1 Ashburton 

Place. 


1898, \ 


207 


145 


Ill 


96 


- 


1899, . 










224 


104 


217 


-117 


123 


1900, . 










248 


113 


256 


188 


181 


1901, . 










225 


149 


169 


162 


168 


1902, . 










203 


168 


121 


164 


246 


1903, . 










76 


120 


96 


126 


243 


1904, . 










347 


172 


220 


176 


355 


1905, . 










495 


396 


489 


231 


442 


1906, . 










231 


145 


246 ' 


154 


261 


1907, . 










147 


246 


118 


130 


176 


1908, . 










162 


138 


137 


136 


148 


1909, . 










198 


229 


119 


150 


195 


1910, . 










216 


- 


180 


178 


213 


1911, . 










205 


204 


151 


175 


197 


1912, . 










429 


450 


227 


249 


259 


1913, . 










123 


243 


157 


119 


140 


1914, . 










288 


- 


252 


174 


220 


1915, . 










163 


- 


128 


117 


134 


1916, . 










128 


- 


85 


102 


105 


Averag 


es, 


227 


201 


183 


155 


211 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



191 



CO 

o 



i-o 
co 

.CO 



SO 
CO 

CO 



CO 



oo 

1! 

.© 



CO 
"to 



00 

O 



I 



eo 
© 

3 



co 
6 

ffl 

< 



i~o eg 

■& 2 

CO H 

co &L 

-to 



M.-H 

w £ 

°CG 
CO- 


•(aoiAiag 
uo^inqTjsy I %°e d^x 


J^cOiCMtcO-'tl-^co-i-ieftCftO 

i-lrtt-IHHrtHHH i—l 


CO 


•(aoiAiag 
Avoq;) no^sog '^aai^g 


1-H 1— 1 1-H 1— IHrtHl- ItHH 1— 1 


CO 

1— 1 


O H 


•(aoiAiag q§tH) 348-ie 

-Ag; '^aaj^g ^DOOUBJJ 

'noiq^g ajig q.13 dBj, 


t»l>-COir5 , *''l<»OkacOt>.coe© 


CO 


•(801 

-Aiag Ai-o^j) pjojpaj^ 
'pje^ pooM.uaj£) ^s draj, 


NtOW^H^M^NOHO 


CO . 


Fells 
Reser- 
voir. 


•asnoq-G^BQi ^tianujg; 


t-t^cq^rti-^TttioiocouskO 


i« 


H Q 

O B 
Ik O 
CO PL, 


qidap-pipj 


* GO OO CO 00 tJ( ■* ■* \1$ «© to iC «o 


CO 


►J 

g H 


asnoq-a^Q ^uanujg; 


t»«Om^CNieOtM<MOC35C350 
r— (i-Ht— li- IHr- li— 11— 1 r- 1 i-H 


CN 

i-l 


•(^onpanby 


I 1 1 1 1 1 1 I 1 1 1 1 


1 


•(lonpanby 

Ajnqpng) ^ui 


C5l>.COCOCOt^C©TflCM»-l©'-l 


>o 


■ 1 

o 
O 


t -suresi^g ^uengui 


eft co oo oo »o t-h i coohoo 
cnj co ■>* co rt< us T^cococoeo 


US 
CO 


•aio^og 


i-ioot— n<'*co»oi^.-<^cNobio 

CMi-HCMCNCNTtlCOlClCftCOt^rH 


00 


'W&p-PTH 


CB»05M(Ni- IOOtHOOOOOO'* 
rHrHrHCSJCC|CNI»-1(M'rtT-l^i-l 


Cft 


'QOBjang 


NOrHTfMCNlC0e6t>-«5 00T|( O 
HNMCqiMIMMHHHHH 1 CM 


Fram- 
ing ham 
Reser- 
voir 

No. 3. 


•q}dap-pij\[ 


CSCOCOCONCOlOlCCOfHHiH 


"5 


►;B ■ 
« o 
p > ■ 

ffl Cm 

H 

fc> CO 


•puu'eqQ uadQ jo pug 


(OCOt)IOOOHO>'*MNHN 
HHiHCNIHNHiHiHHt-IiH 


CO 
1-H 


•uio^og; 


e» N CO ifl >o CO N •>#CS|CN|CO>-l 
T-li^rHi^i— 11— IHNHi- IHi- 1 


CO 


•q^dap-piH 


CftCOlOOOOOOCOCOCOCNi— IO 


KO 
1—1 


•ooBpng 


THU5>01flCON«5TtlC<|l-trHiH 


1-1 


W O 
05 s. 


•J8AI£[ la^BAqn^g 


CNOOCNCOt- IIOi- IC35-<HCMI^i-l 
COCNCNCM^IOCOCOCNCNCNCO 


CO 


•jaAry; ^axodaum£) 


ocoectocoiocNoooocNt^co 

■"^COCCCOTHCONlOMMCO^ 




•aSpug q.aai^g laisaojo^ 


OOCNt s -»«if505i— ICOi—(Tt<»-HCO 
COCOCNCNCO'<4* , *COCMi-ti-(i-l 


Cft 
CN 


•Tnoq^og; 


rtHO-HrHNMMNNHH 


CM 

i— 1 




•q^dap-piH 


i-li-ICfti-4CMCN)CNI-rtf>*l(Mi— li— 1 

i-H 1— t 1-<1-<1-H1— 41— IHHHl- 1 


CM 

i— 1 


•ao'Bjjng 


'HO.OiHMlMMMMINHlH 


CM 

i—l 


H 

H 
O 
















ID 
<D 
M 
03 
M 

a> 
> 
< 



c 
o 

e 



*o 
a 

a> to 

• 2 § 

S £ 

o CD 

o) ,d 



f) 



co g 

u co 
S* «> 

a ■»» 

3 CD 

"o "3 
w co 

CO CD 

■a ^ 

a £ 
fl .a 

a> .H 

> .2 
"5b ^S 
S S 

° 8 
8.S 

-d © 
cr" > 
- 'S 

CO 



192 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



5s» 

cd 
cd 






2 

§ 

•J? 
a 

o 



CO 




M 




>-H 




O 




>-* 




> 

£ 

00 




s 








•c* 




A 




00 




o 
5 




fc. 








£ 




a 
9 




fr. 




> 




CD 




bO 




£ 




ft 

o 




JS 




T3 




e 




9 




•<>> 




+» 




l»0 








ft. 




S 




© 








s» 




o8 




CD 




d 




05 


co 


a 

© 


'3 
.a 


^ 


© 


,_ 


a 


«*S 




a 












^ 


©• 


*g< ^* 


03 




•<f» 


£ S 


m 


CO 


CD 




05 
CO 
O 

E 


fts 


CD 


a 


<D 


eo 


M 


O 


Q 










<>> 








O 








•<*> 








J- 




ft 




£ 




i 




s 




| 




© 








,J«. 




oo 




*«-» 




05 




V. 




ffi 




.2* 




a 




e 




+s 




fe 




id 

CJ 




*& 




00 

o 
o 

C3 




CO 
05 




ft 




In 




0) 




s 




i 




--— 

©■ 




03 

05 




fe 




1 




M. 




5» 












1 




d 
5 

i 

c 




00 




<s 




CO 




05 

3 




o 




3 




£ 




2 

ft 




a 




a 




< 




A 




H 




E 





iz; .. 
w £ 



•(9DIAjag 

uo^anqqsv I V* d«x 



•(&oiAjeg 
avot;) uo^sog; '^.ggj^g 
uo^siAog 081 »« dt?x 



^NOOMrHOtHOOOOOOOO 



t»ONNM<ON»tOO-iOO 



O « 



•(apiAaag q3iH) W9JQ 

-A[J '^98J^g 5J0O0UBH 

'uor^g 911^ ^b dBX 



•(90IAl9g ' 

poo.w.ug'jQ yz dBX 



<OOOOOONMMtOlOOOM 



OOiOKMOOOOOO'*f?'<J<COOO 



- & 5 • 



•rao^og 



•q^d9p-pipi 



•goBjmg 



OOOU30WOOOOU5 1SM 



moiOMtowoo^Nioo 



K50fiOOONNNOWC»0> 



»5h 3 w « 






N^cOtHNO^OCSOOOOOO 



^1 f 



h3 gQS Ho 



15 . 






o 2 , 



•uio^^og 



•q^d9p-pipj[ 



•goBjing 



ICOIOOOOOOOMNOCOOO 



lOOOiOMWOOOUSOOO 



OMTflOiMOOOOOOlOCDOON 



H O 

^^ w 

W « £ 
a tf " 
Sow 



fa 15 . 

S t w 

►J A " 
CM «W5 

to _r 



•rao^og 



•q^d9p-pxj\[ 



•goBjjng 



©M«5C»COC»NOOiOiO<00 



Oooo>eocN)CNioo->4<^c35ecoo 



ffliONMOHOOH^THOilO 






•laua'BqQ 



ugdo jo pug; 



MMOMOOOOOOMOO 






- « 






P W^-'^ 1 oo 






•uio^og 



•T^dgp-pt^ 



•goBjing 



(NOMWiOiflOOOOOOO 



OOOmONOOMOiOMiOO 



ujoieotocoooeo^io^toM 



fa 15 
O O^. 

W P S H 5 W 

* fe r c? ■■< H 






p PJ ft <; > r 7 

K w w J «[!< 



•tuo^og 



•q->d9p-ptpi 



•aoBjing 



o 



NCBMOOMOJiHCOiOOO 



tCOOOOHlOMlONCOO 



Tt'OOOOOCBOOO'-llCiHIO 



$ 




o 

O) 

13 



a 

o 
-Q 

a 

C3 



ft 

T3 



a 



3 



00 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



193 



Table No. 39. 



Temperatures of the Air at Three Stations on the Metropolitan 
Water Works in 1916. 

[Degrees Fahrenheit.! 









Chestnut Hill 
Reservoir. 


Framingham. 


Clinton. 


Month. 


a 

53 

a 
1 


a 

a 

'3 


c 

03 




a 

53 

a 

a 


a 

53 

a - 

a 




a 
a 
1 


a 

a 
.s 




January, .... 


64 


2 


31.6 


63 





29.8 


62 


1 


29.2 


February, 






55 


—8 


24.4 


55 


—19 


22.5 


44 


—19 


20.5 


March, 






58 


2 


27.8 


59 





26.7 


62 


— 5 


26.7 


April, 






71 


29 


45.6 


68 


29 


45.8 


67 


27 


43.7 


May, 






81 


36 


58.3 


82 


37 


58.7 


76 


39 


56.8 


June, 






84 . 


44 


62.0 


84 


39 


62.3 


80 


45 


60.6 


July, 






92 


51 


72.6, 


91 


50 


73.0 


87 


51 


71.1 


August, . 






95 


45 


71.0 


95 


46 


70.8 


88 


49 


69.2 


September, 






91 


39 


64.2 


87 


38 


63.7 


84 


40 


61.5 


October, . 






83 


31 


55.0 


82 


26 


53.3 


79 


29 


51.8 


November, 






68 


14 


41.7 


65 


12 


39.8 


62 


17 


39.7 


December, 






58 


7 


31.5 


58 


6 


29.4 


55 


5 


28.8 


Averages, 


- 


- 


48.8 


- 


- 


48.0 


- 


- 


46.6 



194 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



© 



© 

a, 

o 



■"© 

CO 
© 

-© 

© 



"© - 

S 00 



© 




si 


q 


© 




•<«» 


u 






*i> 


© 


o. 


CQ 


<r» 




© 


f? 


O 


•e* 


"© 


-to 




co 


© 


CO 


CO 





CO 
Si..© 



SO 



Oj 



^ 



J- 
CO 



53 

% 

"© 
si 
© 

if 
© 
5 

CO 

©s 

© 



5= <0 

^ -© 

Si © 

3 
5 

CO 



-© 



© 

6 

a 
•j 
a 

< 







us co 


oo 


oo 


us 


o 


us 


1 


CO 


00 i— 1 


^ H 








i^ 


■*> 






CO 






OS CM 


00 


"5 


■* US 


co 


CO 






•H 






US US 


CO 


■4S 


us 
















US 




o 
Eh 


s 
















1 










eo i-i 


I 


, 


I 


1 


1 


1 


1 


eo i-H 


1 




•* 


CO 
















eo 






us CO 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


us eo 


1 




to 


00 CM 
OB 
















00 CM 






CO oc 


I 


1 


1 


1 


, 


1 


1 


O0 00 


1 






l>- i-t 
















l>- 1-H 






00 


oo 
















00 






CO 00 


,_, 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


CO 00 


_ 




o 
«HI 


00 -H 
CO 
















OO 1-H 

CO 






OS US 


o 


oo 


_ 


1 


1 


1 


1 


t>. CO 


o 






o> o 


1-H 














o o 






tr* 


■^ 1-1 
















IO H 






T-* 


e© 
















CO 




3 




CM 
















CM 






CO i-H 
CM 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


CO 1-H 

CM 


1 




t"-. 1-H 


co 


CO 


1 


_ 


CM 


1 


1 


00 i-l 


H* 




l>- OO 


CO 














o oo 


CO 


<0 


!>. 
















»>-_ 




m 


vd 


i>" 
















t>T 








CO 
















CO 




i— i 


























Oi rt< 


US 


^* 


i-H 


1 


•«*< 


1 


1 


Oi US 


US 




CO US 


■**< 


CO 






OO 






CO US 


-* 




o 


© 
















<o 




05 


CM 


CO 
















CO 




a 




t^ 
















I>- 




£ 
























£ 




o» a> 


<M 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


I 


OS C5 


CM 


fa 




-# US 


1< 














•^t US 


■^ 


«* 


CO 
















eo 




o 


CM 


US 
















us 




« 




CO 
















oo 




W 




























t- -H 


O 


CO 


^ 


— H 


CO 


1 


1 


t» CM 


^ 




OO •**< 


CM 


l^ 






t^. 






OO •<*! 


CM 


O 


CO 
















CO 




< 


CO 


o" 
















CJi" 




P 




* 
















■* 






CM CO 


■* 


us 


CM 


1 


1 


1 


1 


t^. us 


-* 






us us 


■** 


eo 












00 us 


-* 




<x> 


t^ 
















t- 






*o 


CO 
















T-H 

CO 






OS CM 


CO 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


?2 cm 


eo 




© 


O0 
















00 






e» 
















e» 








CO 
















CO 






O r-* 


US 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


O 1-H 


US 




























CM 


00 

o> 
















00 

cjT 






C35 h»< 


■**! 


CO 


1 


US 


CO 


1 


*c* 


CM Ht< 


us 






c*> us 


CM 


CO 






■** 






O) US 


CM 




CO 


© 


'~ l 














o 


tH 




^«l 


CM 
















CM 
































CO US 


i— t 


CO 


1 


CM 


1 


1 


CM 


CM US 


^H 






t- 


us 


CM 












o 


us 


, 


s 


CO 
CO 
















00 
CO 

H»< 
















































1-H 








<S> 
















o 








1—4 
















































CO 

6 
0) 

P 




-t-» 

a> 

«4-l 






w 
CO 






1-H 

eo 

8 • 








"8 




CO 

1-H 
OS 










P 








si 

B 
CD 

a 
o 




bC 

.2 
"2 






1— c 

ex 

.2 






03 
a> 








13 

a 

03 03 




aT 




13 


«J 




gth owned and op 

eet). ' 

e valves in same, 








T3 g 


a* 


3 


2 


aT 


13 


2 


a~ 


«5 






otal length owne 

(feet). 

ate valves in sa: 


s 

o] 
to 

.2 

03 
03 
> 

03 


(-. 

o 
ft 


03 
m 

a 

oo 
> 

"3 

CP 


s 

03 
tn 

_a 

03 

OJ 
^> 


a 
o 

a 

03 

.a 

03 
bfl 


03 

03 

.2 

03 

o 
j> 

"o3 
> 


2 

03 

03 

03 
O 

^> 

> 


2 

S3 

03 

03 
03 

> 

'3 

> 






H 


c 
a> 


03 


h 


a 

CD 


o3 


H 


<u J5 


H 






H O 


< 


h3 


a 


'•< 


hJ 


O 


^ 


H-l O 


<1 



^3 
bO 

■ S 
o 



13 . 
a* a> 

fl ft 



O 13 

M | 

o > 

a o 

3 I 



° § 



5 03 

•3S «5 



§.2 

CM O 



03 



g «z a cm 

•-i us | -' - 1 

rt CO M M 

u 

c 

03 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



195 



© 



© 
© 



© 
a, 

© 



5s: 
•O 

•*o 

© 

© 

§s 

cs 

"to 

© 
£ go 

S & 

I 

Ci SO 

^2 © 
oq 

© 



© 



MO 

© 

•to 



O 

s 

< 



o 
H 



t* i— ( O i— I 



*a ..... -45 

o © 

CO Oi ?o CO 

»— i i— i 

g . S • 2 -8 

'n .S Q 

S .3 .15 . S 



a .3 



c 



o" 


_Q 


© 


£ 


73 


S 


3 


3 

CO 


c 


c8 


a 










A 




© 
> 


ti 


8 




s 




cS 


© 


St) 


> 


i-l 


> 



be 

a 



196 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



"Ss 

•*3 

ft. 
ft, 
53 

co 

CO 

i 



O 



V. 




v> 




R> 




<4) 




CQ 




<*> 




•< 


"© 




>-s 


<>* 


Ob 


*<S> 


>-, 








GO 


Sv 




cs 


o 


^3 


v> 


ss 


CO 


c 


-4? 


Sv 

HO 

v> 


Jv 

1 


<■» 




s-s 


<» 


•«s 




Q 


sS 


se 


t— ■ 


•^ 


S 


CO 


w 


<v> 


HO 








»-o 


{3 


& 


>*h 


c» 




v. 


V. 




S 




O 




fen 




„ 




CO 




v> 




ft. 




•*» 




Oh 




h. 




v> 








w 




fe 





6 

PQ 







tv 


CO tv 


t<. 


© us us 


CO 


s 


CO 


CO 


CM 


© i-l US 


IQ 


© 


tv 1-C 




CO 




CO 


cm 


CO tv 


hK 


<e >o m 


*# 


© 


IV 


CO 


M N N 


US 


CO 


© 00 




oo 




9 


09 


— US 


^H 


CO © CM 


at 


CO 


**< 


© 


CO 


© CM © 


CD 


l> 


<M CM 


' 


CM 






CM 


co r. 


SB 


Tji us co 


o 


ie 


IQ 


co 


1*1 


US CO CM 


CO 


CO 


<M CM 




CO 


to 
< 

O 


s 




CO 




kk^i i-i 






















co 

1-H 




00 


CM us 


to 


© i-i 00 


a 


_ 


CM 


© 


US 


IV. US CO 


t» 


CM 


00 CO 


t"- 


1 




© 


us co 


CO 


CO © CO 


CO 


© 


© 


© 


CO 


tv 00 © 


CM 


N 


© CO 


US 




Eh 




us 


■* CO 


s 


^h CO CM 


US 


US 


CM 


IV 


us 


© cO CO 


CO 


cr- 


US ■**! 


co 








































O 


us 


O us 


0a 


© CO CO 


■<B 


cxi 


■Q 


C3 


1*1 


CO CM 00 




CO 


© © 








J* 


1 


US O 


CO 


CO CO © 


CD 


CO 


CO 


© 


Hh 


© «v. CO 


co 


CB 


i-H CM 


1*1 






fe 


US US 


-* 


CM CM CO 


CO 


oq 


CM 


ON 


CM 










°i 










■* 
























OS" 








co 


cm co 


o 


© © © 

us o CM 


CO 


«NI 


CO 


ce 


VH 


IV. I>- i-< 


A 


5 


00 U3 


US 


CM 






eo 


OO 00 


CO 


© 


IQ 


CO 






CM •**! 00 


CO 


© <M 


■f 


© 








CO o 


(M 


CO CO CO 


© 


N 


<M 


00 


© 


© i-l CM 


a 


r> 


(M © 


CM 






H« 






























o 

CO 






CO CNJ 


us 


CO © t^ 


03 


CO 


CM 




IQ 


IV. IV O0 




N 


OS OS 










O CM 


US 


CO © 


CM 


us 


l> 






1-1 US 1-H 




OJ 


US 


© 








*~ ' 
























© 






us 


OO — < 


Cw 


■^< © 1— 1 
co in f 
f^ us © 


© 


OB 


N 


co 


If 


CM © us 


us 


© 


© CO 


CO 


CO 






CO 


»-H CO 


OO 


« 


co 


CO 


© 


a 


© CM © 


tv 




© us 


CM 


IQ 






© 


<M -*i 


(M 


© 


CM 


CO 


CM 


CO 


CO Tf © 


© 


■00 


00 tv 


■*!. 




































oo 

OS 




© 




i-H if 


© 


CM US CO 


b. 


at 


CO 


© 


co 


CM CO US 


CM 


c-. 


© © 


oo 






CO i-h 


(M 


•»*<•*© 


LO 


«* 


© 


^H 


CO 


us us © 






CO tv 


00 


© 








CM_ CM 


eq 






















CO 










•J 
























CO 




C" 


1 


1 1 


1 


1 '. cS 
© 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


I 1 1 


1 


1 


1 1 


1*1 

OS 

© 


© 

1-H 


































© 




CO 


rf if 


"gj 


CO 00 CO 


co 


© 


IQ 


CO 


CM 


OS tv o 


US 


CO 


© CO 


© 


CM 






tv 


CO *$* 
O Oi 




CO us us 


© 


CM 


IV 


3 


co 


Y-l CO ~H 




CO 


© © 

00 us 


»v. 


•* 






co 


t^ 


CM CM «* 


©_ 


N 


CM 


© 


IV 


co © i-i 


CO 


1*1 


CO 




































t>* 




00 




CO CO 


© 


© us co 


•* 


us 


CM 


IV? 


© 


CM 'CO US 


© 


IQ 


T*l © 


© 


© 








o o 


GO 


CO CM CO 


© 


CM 


CO 


CM 


CO 


us CO 


CM 


CO 




IV. 


CM 








00 i-l 
























U5 






© 


Tf 1-1 


SO 


CO Tfi 1*1 


OB 


CO 


N 


o. 


CM 


CO CO us 


1*1 


OS 


© CO 


r- 


© 






co 


OS 00 


t^. 


CM © CM 


US 


5 


IQ 


us 


1—1 


CM IV. CM 


US 


N 


US © 


CO 


© 




© 


tv 


o t^ 


cq 


co oo © 


CM 


00 




■o* 


CM 


© © 00 


© 


OO 


US CO 


© 








































v4 


CO 


CO CO 




© CM CM 


o 


© 


IV 


ei 


oo 


© 1*1 1-1 


© 


If 


1-H CO 


© 


IQ 








us us 

CO 


(TO 


co ^ ^ti 


CO 


■^ 


CM 


1—1 


CM 


CM N 


"- 1 




i-H 1— 1 


© 
oo 






tv 


US CM 


us 


OS Tf us 


CO 


f— I 


US 


02 


CD 


CO © us 


If 


© 


© ■"*) 


If 


CO 






o 


i— 1 CO 


■* 


N 0O N 


CO 


© 


CM 


us 


CO 


US ^*t CM 




© 


US *-t 


co 


CM 






us 


<M_ CO 


t^ 


rlH_ © ^ 


© 


CO 


1—1 


© 




US © ^ 


IV 


© 


1-H IV 


© 




































CO 




CM 


© 


CO OS 


© 


us co cT 




CM 


3»! 


us 


SfJ 


CM ■<* IV. 


IQ 


© 


© 


O0 


9 




^ 


cm 


CM CO 


CO 


CM 


CO 


CM 


CN 




CM 


CM 








co 


CO 




1 1 1 i I 1 I 1 1 < j I 1 I I i I I i 1 

CNJ. 


1 


CO 
CM 

© 




CO 


1-1 © 


143 


oo 


CO 


© 


IQ 


IV 


1 


T* 1 1 


1 


1 


© US 


© 


© 






<M 


CM us 


IQ 


© 


CS 


CM 


oo 


IV 




■*« 






© -"f 




CO 




^t 




O OS 




© 


>o 


Oa 


IV 


O0 










© © 


■H< 






*-< 






























CM 








us t^ 


© 


us 


oi" 


C-l 


us 


3 










iCH CO 


US 

© 






CO 


CO ~+ 


t^ 


co •>* CM 


u> 


CO 


© 


© 


1 


CO 1 1 


1 


1 


1 1 


us 


« 






© 


t>- CM 


* 


t» © CO 


r~ 


OJ 


© 


© 




© 








US 


US 


so 

W 


<0 


tv 


""1 °- 


rt N N 


IV 


CM 


SB 


*>*< 




1-H 








IV. 




vH 


tv" 


»H ^ 


US 


us us co 


CO 


US* 


CO 














CO 


us 

tv 


X 
5 




CO 


US 

CM 




CM 






N 














© 
co 






1 


1 t^ 


1 


I 1 I 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 1 1 


1 


I 


1 1 


IV. 


tv 


H- ( 


00 




CO 

CO 
























co 
CO 


© 

© 




© 


1-H 1-H 


1 


1 © © 


CO 


j 


i 


1 


I 


1 II 


1 


1 


1 1 


CO 


CO 






CO 


CO CM 




© t~ 


N 


















tv 


© 




o 


o 


co i>» 




OS © 


© 


















CO 






C4 


CO 


t^ CO 




CM CM 




















£? 


oi 

CO 






tv 


00 
























tv 
































»H 






© 


CO 1 


1 


1 ■"*< 1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 1 1 


1 


1 


1 1 


CO 


<M 






T 


US 




co 




















CO 


"* 




■*" 


CO 


© 




™ 




















co 






CH 


IQ~ 


CO 




CM 




















US 


i-H 

co 






CO 


t>- 
























© 
































~ 






1 


^** 1 


1 


1 1 1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 1 1 


I 


1 


1 1 


■*# 


us 




00 




























1*1 


o 




en 




■* 
























CM 


©' 




tv 


co I 


1 


1 1 1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 1 1 


1 


1 


1 1 


IQ 


co 






co 


CO 
























«M 


© 




5 


CO 

oT 

H* 


© 

OS 
























tv 

fH 


tv 

CN 




tv 


9° 1 


1 


1 1 1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 1 1 


1 


1 


1 1 


US 


CO 






co 


CM 
























^H 


tv 




8 


tv 


»H 
























OS 






i— t 


t«r 
























OO 


oo 






CO 


co 
























© 


1-1 




© 
CO 


S ' 


1 


1 i 1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 1 1 


1 


1 


1 I 


s 


tv 

CO 




e 


91 


*H 
























© 






Hj« 


CO 


CO 
























CO 
CM 


•<*i 




o 


CO I 


1 


1 1 1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 1 1 


1 


1 


1 1 


CO 


© 






M 


t^ 
























00 


tv 




9 


CO 


^ 
























CM 






oT 


>o 
























IQ* 


■*fi 








VN 
























o5 






ex 


t>- 1 


1 


1 1 1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 1 1 


1 


1 


1 1 


•© 


© 




9 


© 

o 


8 
























<M 
tv 


© 




3 


©" 
























CM 


^ 






o* 


























CM 






CN 


1 1 


1 


1 1 1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 1 1 


i 


1 


1 1 


CM 


© 




s 


1 

CO 


























co" 


co 
co 




ft 


& 
































H 


































> 


£ 


























_ 


85 


I ( 


o 

2 

o 

i 

F 
M 

25 


I 

O CO 

& ^ 

O 'i 

s ^ 


Boston, 
Somerville, 


a 
i 
-a 


Chelsea, 
Everett, 
Quincy, 


! 


fc-H 

m 


Revere, * 

Watertown, 

Ailington, 

Milton, . 

Winthrop, 

Stoneham, 


d 
o 

1 

PQ 


to 
I 

1 


Nahant, 
Swampscott, 


1 

•a 

} 


Total mil 



02 



I 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



19; 



Table No. 43. — Number of Service Pipes, Meters and Fire Hydrants in the 
Several Cities and Towns supplied by the Metropolitan Water Works, Dec. 
SI, 1916, and the Number of Services and Meters installed during the Year 
1916. 



City or Town. 


Services. 


Meters. ■ 


Fire 
Hydrants. 


Services 
Installed. 


Meters 
Installed. 


Boston, . . . 


104,615 


61,046 


9,517 


1,675 


7,089 


Somerville, 












13,418 


9,850 


1,224 


200 


702 


Maiden, . 












8,097 


7,782 


587 


87 : 


87 


Chelsea, . 












5,125 


5,113 


397 


156 


158 


Everett, . 












5,980 


3,269 


585 « 


89 . 


322 


Quincy, . 










. . . 


9,705 


8,872 


1,119 


403 


630 


Medford, . 












6,409 


6,234 


692 


376 ! 


393 


Melrose, . 












4,098 


4,296 


368 


97 j 


106 


Revere, l . 












4,589 


3,349 


297 


146 


212 


Watertown, 












2,964 


2,967 


398 


166 : 


345 


Arlington, 












2,947 


2,947 


484 


211 


209 


Milton, 












1,965 


2,024 


433 


104 


104 


Winthrop, 












2,970 


2,899 


296 


70 


70 


Stoneham, 












1,634 


1,611 


156 


21 


22 


Belmont, . 












1,632 


1,632 


245 


202 


202 


Lexington, 












1,206 


1,139 


220 


53 


78 


Nahant, . 












745 


516 


101 


16 


48 


Swampscott, . 












1,873 


1,873 


188 


68 


68 


Totals, 


179,972 


127,419 


17,307 


4,140 


10,845 



1 Includes small portion of Saugus. 



198 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



a 

s 

CO 



HO 



►«5 

e 

CO 

aq 



5S> 



•to ™l 

! J 



•<o 

.555 






I 



3 

6 
« 

e3 



o 
o 



M 
O 

> 

« 

a 

a 
o 

M 

n 

« 
W 

a 
o 

0Q 


WATERTOWN 

WATER WORKS 

OFFICE, MAIN 

STREET. 


'mnxmmyi 


cMCMCMCMcMcMcMCNIcM 


<* N N 
<M CM CM 


oo 

CM 




•innuiTX'Bj^ 


cocM<McocoeocMe<i<M 

CO • CO CO CO CO CO CO CO CO 
CMCMcMcM<McMCM<McM 


cm cm co 

CO CO CO 
CM CM <M 


CM 

c© 

CM 




BOSTON METRO- 
POLITAN WATER 
WORKS OFFICE, 
1 ASHBURTON 
PLACE. 


•ranunurj^ 


cMcM(MCO<MCOOOt^C© 
CO CO CO CO CO CO CO CO CO 
CMCMcMiMcMeNICMcMCM 


»0 CO CO 

CO CO CO 

cm cm <M 


CO 
CM 




•ranuiix'Bj^ 


OOOOOOOOSOOOOOO 
^4 ^i ^4 ^}4 ^4 ^4 kO ^(44 ^4 

CNcMCMcMcMCNcMcMCN 


OO OO OO 
CM <M CM 


3 

CM 




B 
o 

PS 
B 

go 

£ 

o 

h3 


a 

< t> 
H O 

o 
o 


•■ranunuim 


kOt-»oao»tf5coco»-ieo 


CO ^* ^* 

ko its tr> 












•ranunxtTj^ 


lOCOCOCOiCCOCO<MCO 
CO CO CO CO CO CO CO CO CO 


CO <* »ft 

CO cp CO 


CO 










MALDEN WATER 

WORKS SHOP, 
GREEN STREET. 


•ranuiiuij^ 


CO <M CO CO «-H •- i -h O <M 

CO CO CO CO CO CO CO co CO 


CM (M CO 

CO co CO 


CM 

CO 










•uinuirxBj\[ 


l^-cOcOcOCOiOtfJ'O'tf* 
CO CO CO CO CO CO CO CO CO 


iO co CO 

CO CO CO 


CO 

CO 


a 

i 

a 






SOMERVILLE 

PUBLIC LIBRARY, 

HIGHLAND 

AVENUE. 


•ranraiurj^ 


^4*C9N(N<*^TfW 

CO CO CO CO CO CO CO CO CO 


^ ^ CO 
CO CO CO 


CO 
CO 


O 
M 


•uirnnrx'Bj^ 


oejjoit^oooosooo 

t~-.COCOCOCOl--.COl-- CO 


CO OO t^ 

CO CO CO 


as 

CO 


>> 

o 






B 

3 
=a 
3 


MEDFORD l 

CITY HALL, 

HIGH STREET. 


•raniniuij^ 


CM CM -H CM »H —4 1-1 1 | | | | 

CO CO CO CO CO CO CO 


CO 

— / 


•uintuix'Bj^ 


CO CO iO iO iO up CO || | |. | 
CO CO CO CO CO CO CO 


CO 


> 

o 

S 
a> 

(H 

bO 

a 


MEDFORD, 

MYSTIC 

RESERVOIR. 


•umunutj\[ 


CMCMCM'-lt-li-lcMIMcM 

CO CO CO CO CO CO CO CO CO 


CM CO CM 

CO CO CO 


CM 

CO 








•uinuiix , Bj\[ 


USiftiOCOcOCOb-r-l"^ 

CO CO CO CO CO CO CO CO CO 


co co co 

CO CO CO 


CO 

CO 










ALLSTON 

ENGINE HOUSE, 

HARVARD 

STREET. 


•uinunurpf 


t^t^t-»COt^CO00O5O5 
CO CO CO CO CO CO CO CO CO 


as o r- 

CO CO CO 


00 

CO 










•uinuiixBj^ 


10^(4(I^I04|IU510'# 


*Cf* ^* CO 

l-~ t- t>. 


Tf4 










BOSTON 

ENGINE HOUSE, 

BULFINCH 

STREET. 


•tunuiiuij^ 


coooioa>«0'»* , co<Mc^ 

■«4COeOCO'^4.'^4^4'<t<T»4 


CO CO -«t< 


CM 










•uinuiixTij^ 


eoco , <t | 0"<» ,, ct<coc0'^' 

cOiC^»OCOcOcOcoeo 


•^* ^* CO 

CO CO CO 


g 














a 

§ 

o 






U 


October, 

November, 

December, 


IB 
& 

3 
c 

> 

< 





No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



199 



J3 
'o 

PS 

o 
Q 



to 

■to 

to 



•<s> 

o 

© 

•to 

O 
to 

O 



to 



to 

4 



3 

to 



© 
e 

Si 

to 

r~o 
to 

© 
S-. 
to 



6 
h 





05 






























Northern 
Extra High 

Service. 


INGTON 
N HALL, 
CHUSET1 

ENUE. 


•uinuiiuij\[ 


us 

ft 


Lf5 

ft 


ft 







«9 

O 


CM 


O 


OS 
O 


■<ti 


CO 


OS 
ft 


CO 

ft 






























LEX 

TOW 

MASSA 

AV 


•urnxurcBj^ 


00 
CM 
ft 




CM 

ft 


OS 
CM 
ft 


1^ 

CM 


CO 
CM 




CO 
CM 


OS 


O 
CM 


00 

CM 


CM 


OS 
CM 
ft 


us 

CM 

ft 




WINTHROP 

TOWN HALL, 

HERMAN 

STREET. 


■uinuiiuij\[ 


O 
OO 




ft 


CI 


OS 


CO 


CO 
1^ 


CO 


00 
1-- 


OO 


CM 

00 


CM 

00 


00 
































•umunx'Bj\r 


co 

OS 


os 


C5 


CM 

C5 


OS 


OS 


O 
OS 


00 

00 


CM 

OS 


CO 

OS 


OS 


■«*t 
OS 


CM 

OS 


fa 
o 

K 
fa 
W 

w 

o 

H 

w 

K 
fa 

w 

« 

O 


LYNN ENGINE 

HOUSE, UNION 

SQUARE. 


•umunmj\[ 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 

9 


1 


1 


1 


CO 

us 
CM 


CM 
US 
<M 


CO 

10 

CM 


•uinuiixej^ 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


, 


! 


1 


US 

CO 
CM 


ft 
CO 
CM 


"5 
CO 
CM 




REVERE 

WATER WORKS 

OFFICE, 

BROADWAY. 


•Tunxniuij\[ 


00 
us 

CM 


OS 
CM 


O 

CM 


CM 


CM 


CO 

10 

CM 


OS 
CM 


CM 


US 
CM 


<M 

US 

CM 


CO 
CM 


US 
CN 


ft 

us 
CM 


•umunxBj^; 


c© 
CM 


CO 

CM 


CO 
CO 
CM. 


1^ 

CO 

CM 


CO 

CM 


US 

CO 
CM 


CM 

CO 

CM 


CM 

CO 
CM 


CO 

CM 


O 
CM 


00 
CO 
CM 




CO 
CO 
CM 


fa •<! 
3 K 




•ranuituij^ 


us 

CO 
CM 


CO 
CD 
CM 


.CO 

CO 
CM 


CO 
CO 

CM 


CO 
CM 


CO 

CO 
CM 


CM 

CO 
CM 


CM 

CO 
CM 


CM 

CO 
CM 


us 

CO 
CM 


"S 
CO 
CM 


CO 
CO 
CM 


ft 
CO 

CM 


•uinuiix'Bj^ 


O 
CM 


O 
CM 


O 
CM 


CM 


CM 


O 
CM 


00 
CO 
CM 


CO 
CM 


O 
CM 


O 
CM 


CM 


O 
CM 


O 
CM 




SOMERVILLE 
PUMPING STA- 
TION, CEDAR 
STREET. 


•ranuiiuij^ 


OS 
ft 


OS 
ft 

CM 


OS 
CM 


O 
•** 
CM 


-c» 
CM 


CM 


CO 
CM 


CO 

CM 


CO 
■<*< 
CM 


us 

-CK 
CM 


US 

CM 


O 
us 
CM 


ft 
CM 


•uinuiix'Bj^ 


00 
CO 
CM 


OS 
O 
CM 


OS 



CM 


CM 


00 

CO 
CM 


CO 
CO 
CM 


CO 
CO 

CM 


CO 
CM 


CO 

CM 


00 
CO 
CM 


CO 

CM 


O 
CM 


00 
CO 
CM 




CO 
































QUINCY 

ATER WORK 

SHOP. 


•uinunuxj\[ 


OS 
CM 


OS 
CM 
CM 


O 
CO 
CM 


O 
CO 
CM 


00 
CM 
CM 


00 

CM 
CM 


00 
CM 
CM 


CO 
CM 
CM 


CO 
CM 
CM 


00 

CM 
CM 


OS 
CM 


O 
CO 
CM 


00 
CM 
CM 






























T3 
03 

3 

a 
o 

o 

1 

fa 
o 

« 
fa 
02 

a 
o 

M 

n 


•uinuipcBj^ 


ft 
ft 
CM 


ft 
ft 
CM 


CO 
•■cH 
CM 


•>* 
CM 


CO 
CM 


CO 
CM 


CO 

■<*! 

CM 


CM 
■>* 
CM 


CO 
CM 


CM 


■ft 

CM 


CM 

ft 
CM 


CO 

ft 

CM 


* 




























































FORBES 

HILL TOWER 

QUINCY. 


•uimuiuij^ 


US 

co 

CM 


■ft 
co 
CM 


CO 
CM 


CO 
CO 
CM 


CO 
CM 


US 

CO 
CM 


US 
CO 
CM 


CO 
CO 
CM 


CO 
CO 
CM 


CO 
CM 


■f 
CO 
CM 


ft 

CO 
CM 


ft 
CO 
CM 


•UinUITX'BJ\[ 


US 
ft 
CM 


ft 

CM 


CM 


US 

■*# 

CM 


CM 


CM 


CM 


CO 
CM 


CM 


CM 


■ft 
■«*t 

CM 


ft 
ft 
CM 


ft 
ft 
CM 






























[LTON 

R WORKS 

E, ADAMS 
REET. 


•tunuiiui^ 


ft 
CM 


OS 
CO 
CM 


O 
CM 


C5 
CO 
CM 


OS 
CO 
CM 


OS 
CO 
CM 


CO 
CM 


CO 
CM 


CO 
CM 


00 

CO 
CM 


00 

CO 
CM 


OS 
CO 
CM 


OS 
CO 
CM 






























PS 

fa 

a 

H 
P 
O 
02 


M] 
WATE 
OFFIC 

ST 


•uimupcBj^; 


O 
US 
CM 


OS 
ft 
CM 


O 
CM 


C5 

CM 


OS 
CM 


CM 


CM 


CO 
CM 


CM 


00 

CM 


OS 

ft 

CM 


us 

CM 


00 

ft 

CM 

1 


NT 

ORKS 

VER- 

EET. 


•umunmj\[ 


O 
CM 


OS 

ft 

CM 


00 

CM 


00 

CM 


CO 

CM 


CO 
CM 


US 
CM 


OS 
CO 
CM 


CM 


CM 

CM 


■ft 
CM 


to 

ft 

CM 


CO 

ft 

CM 




3«*B 




























! 
































BE 
WATE 
SHOP 

LEY 


•umunxej^ 


CO 
CM 


CO 
CM 


O 
CO 
CM 


CM 

CO 
CM 


CO 
CM 


CO 
CM 


CO 
CM 


i-H 
CO 

CM 


CM 

CO 
CM 


CO 
CM 


CO 
CM 


© 
CO 
CM 


CO 
CM 







Be- 
rt 

O 
4 


>> 

U 

c3 
3 
PI 
e) 
>-> 


S3 

3 

(H 

» 

fa 


"0 


a 

< 




oT 

c 

3 




cq 
3 
hfi 
3 
< 


o> 

s 

0> 

+s 
ft 

02 


V 



O 


U 
0) 

a 

> 




(-* 
<D 
JO 

a 

a> 



Q 


9 

bt 
0} 

u 
V 

> 

< 



200 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



Appendix No. 3. 



WATER WORKS STATISTICS FOR THE YEAR 1916. 

The Metropolitan Water* Works supply the Metropolitan Water 
District which includes the following cities and towns : — ■ 



City or Town. 



Population, 
Census of 1915. 


Estimated 
Population, 
July 1, 1916. 


745,439 


762,700 


86,854 


89,190 


48,907 


50,160 


43,426 


45,020 


43,113 


43,960 


37,718 


38,870 


40,674 


42,030 


30,509 


32,080 


16,880 


17,260 


25,178 


26,790 


16,515 


17,280 


14,889 


15,670 


8,600 


8,850 


12,758 


13,470 


7,489 


7,590 


7,345 


7,580 


5,538 


5,680 


8,081 


8,560 


1,387 


1,440 


1,201,300 


1,234,180 


280 


280 



Boston, 

Somerville, 

Maiden, 

Chelsea, . 

Newton, i . 

Everett, . 

Quincy, 

Medford, . 

Melrose, . 

Revere, 

Water town, 

Arlington, 

Milton, 

Winthrop, 

Stoneham, 

Swampscott, 

Lexington, 

Belmont, . 

Nahant, . 



Total population of Metropolitan Water District, 
Saugus, 2 



1 No water supplied during the year from Metropolitan Water Works. 

2 Only a small portion of Saugus was supplied with water. 

Pumping. 

Chestnut Hill Pumping Station No. 1 : — 

Builders of pumping machinery, Holly Manufacturing Company, Quintard 
Iron Works and E. P. A His Company. 

Description of coal used: — Bituminous: Alpha Special and Davenport. An- 
thracite: buckwheat. Price per gross ton in bins: bituminous $4.16 to $4.49, 
buckwheat $3.36. Average price per gross ton $4.09. Per cent, ashes 10.2. 

Chestnut Hill Pumping Station No. 2: — 

Builders of pumping machinery, Holly Manufacturing Company. 

Description of coal used : — Bituminous : Alpha Special and Davenport. Anthra- 
cite : buckwheat. Price per gross ton in bins : bituminous $4.05 to $4.35, buck- 
wheat $2.85 to $3.02. Average price per gross ton $3.89. Per cent, ashes 13.2. 

Spot Pond Station: — 
Builders of pumping machinery, Geo. F. Blake Manufacturing Company and 

Holly Manufacturing Company. 
Description of coal used : — Bituminous : New River, Brazil Smokeless and 

Davenport. Anthracite: screenings. Price per gross ton in bins: bituminous 

$5.08 to $6.52, screenings $3.00. Average price per gross ton $4.55. Per cent. 

ashes 13.2. 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



201 





Chestnut Hill, Pumping Stations. 




No. 1. 


No. 2. 




Engines 

Nos. 
1 and 2. 


Engine 
No. 3. 


Engine 
No. 4. 


Engine 

No. 12. 


Daily pumping capacity (gallons), .... 

Coal consumed for year (pounds), . . 

Cost of pumping, figured on pumping station ex- 
penses. 

Total pumpage for year, corrected for slip (million 
gallons). 

Average dynamic head (feet), . . . . . 

Gallons pumped per pound of coal, . 

Duty on basis of plunger displacement, . • . 

Cost per million gallons raised to reservoir, 

Cost per million foot gallons, . . . . 


16,000,000 

401,085 

$2,997.44 

156.09 

134.54 

389.17 

44,970,000 

$19.2033 

.1427 


20,000,000 

4,805 

$63.36 

5.48 

116.40 

1,140.48 

115,660,000 

$11.5620 

.0993 


30,000,000 

852,810 

$9,074.49 

1,334.27 

119.56 

1,564.56 

158,950,000 

$6.8011 

.0569 


40,000,000 

7,417,190 

$26,463.00 

11,084.07 

124.54 

1,494.38 

158,180,000 

$2.3875 

.0192 





Chestnut Hill 

Pumping 
Station No. 2. 


Spot Pond 
Station. 




Engines Nos. 5, 
6 and 7. 


Engines Nos. 8 
and 9. 


Cost of pumping, figured on pumping station expenses, 
Total pumpage for year, corrected for slip (million gallons), 


105,000,000 

3,217,295 

$26,183.46 

6,326. 95 

35.27 

1,966.54 

61,600,000 

$4. 1384 

.1173 


30,000,000 

2,391,339 

$15,159.98 

2,600.82 

129.06 

1,087.60 

119,300,000 

$5. 8289 

.0452 



Consumption. 
Estimated total population of the eighteen cities and towns 

supplied wholly or partially during the year 1916, 
Total consumption (gallons), pump basis, . . ..'.". 
Average daily consumption (gallons), pump basis, 
Gallons per day to each inhabitant, pump basis, . 



1,190,220 

38,018,530,000 

103,876,000 

87.3 



Distribution. 



Owned and 
operated by 
Metropolitan 

Water 

and Sewerage 

Board. 



Total in District 

supplied 

by Metropolitan 

Water Works. 



Kinds of pipe used 

Sizes, 

Extensions, less length abandoned (miles), 
Length in use (miles), .... 

Stop-gates added, 

Stop^gates now in use, .... 
Service pipes added, .... 

Service pipes now in use, ... 

Meters added, 

Meters now in use, 

Fire hydrants added, .... 
Fire hydrants now in use, 



76-4 inch. 

0.03 

122.27 

5 

521 



76-4 inch. 

27.74 

1,882.83 



4,140 

179,972 

10,845 

127,419 

379 

17,307 



1 Cast-iron, cement-lined wrought-iron, cement-lined steel and kalamine pipe. 



202 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



Appendix No. 4. 



Contracts made and pending during 
Contracts relating to the 



1. 

Number 

of 
Contract 



1271 



128i 



1291 



13Qi 



131i 



132i 



135 



137i 



140 



2. 

WORK. 



425 tons of coal for Alewife 
Brook pumping station. 

1,200 tons of coal for Charles- 
town pumping station. 

5,700 tons of coal: — 
2,700 tons of coal for Deer 

Island pumping station. 

3,000 tons of coal for East 

Boston pumping station. 

Cast-iron pipes and special 
castings for Section 1, Deer 
Island outfall extension, 
North Metropolitan System, 
Deer Island, Boston Harbor. 

Section 1A Deer Island outfall 
extension, temporary out- 
fall sewer, North Metropoli- 
tan System, Deer Island, 
Boston Harbor. 

Section 19, Reconstruction in 
new location of Maiden 
River siphon, North Met- 
ropolitan System in Everett 
and Medford. 

Section 1, Deer Island outfall 
extension, North Metropoli- 
tan System, Deer Island, 
Boston Harbor. 



Section 19, North Metropoli- 
tan System, removal of old 
Maiden River siphon, in Ev- 
erett and Medford. 

6,900 tons of coal: — 
2,700 tons for Deer Island 

pumping station. 
3,000 tons for East Boston 

pumping station. 
1,200 tons for Charlestown 

pumping station. 



3. 

Num- 
ber of 
Bids. 



Amount of Bid. 



4. 

Next to 
Lowest. 



$4.58 per 

ton. 
$4.47 per 

ton. 

$18,150 00 



44,358 75 



29,110 00 



62,612 00 



8,000 00 



$6.02 per 

ton. 
$5.84 per 

ton. 

$5.84 



ton. 



per 



5. 

Lowest. 



$5.15 per 
ton. 2 

$4.53 per 
ton. 2 



$4.20 per 

ton. 2 
$4.20 per 

ton. 2 

$16,735 00 2 



43,370 00 2 



26,000 00 2 



38,930 00 2 



6,758 00 2 



$5.90 per 
ton. 2 

$5.65 per 
ton. 2 

$5.75 per 
ton. 2 



* 6. 

Contractor. 



Locke Coal Company, 
Maiden. 

Metropolitan Coal 
Company, Boston. 



New England Coal & 
Coke Company, Bos- 
ton. 



United States Cast 
Iron Pipe and Foun- 
dry Co., Philadel- 
phia, Penn. 



George M. Bryne, Bos- 
ton. 



George M. Bryne, Bos- 
ton. 



Roy H. Beattie, Inc., 
Fall River. 



Boston Dredging Com- 
pany, Boston. 



New England Coal and 
Coke Company, Bos- 
ton. 



i Contract completed. 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



203 



Appendix No. 4. 



the Year 1916 — Sewerage Works. 
North Metropolitan System. 



7. 



Date of Con- 
tract. 



8. 

Date of 

Completion 

of Work. 



Prices of Principal Items of Contracts 
made in 1916. 



10. 

Value of 

Work done 

Dec. 31, 

1916. 



June 10, 1915 
June 10, 1915 
June 11, 1915 

Aug. 27, 1915 

Oct. 11, 1915 

Nov. 16, 1915 

April 22, 1916 



June 30, 1916 



June 14, 1916 



July 1, 1916 
July 1, 1916 
July 1, 1916 

June 30, 1916 

Nov. 6, 1916 

May 27, 1916 



Sept. 26, 1916 



For earth excavation, laying and refilling in trench in 
the bed of the harbor for 84-inch to 48-inch cast- 
iron pipes, $82 per lin. ft.; for furnishing and plac- 
ing quarry-faced dimension granite at outlet, Sta- 
tion 2+58 to Station 3+22, $8.40 per ton of 2,000 
pounds; for furnishing and placing stone reinforc- 
ing and gravel or broken stone refilling under stone- 
work at outlets, Station 1+90 to Station 3+30, 
$5.20 per ton of 2,000 pounds ; for changes at existing 
outlet and connection to sewer, the lump sum of 
$1,100. 

For removing old Maiden River masonry siphon and 
head house (on Everett side), including all pilework 
foundation indicated on "plans, and disposing of 
material, the lump sum of $6,758. 

$5.90 per ton of 2,240 pounds delivered in bins at Deer 

Island pumping station. 
$5.65 per ton of 2,240 pounds delivered in bins at East 

Boston pumping station. 
$5.75 per ton of 2,240 pounds delivered in bins at 

Charlestown pumping station. 



$2,163 24 

5,428 89 

22,455 10 

17,245 98 

44,367 25 

26,039 85 

24,165 20 



6,950 00 



16,288 83 



2 Contract based upon this bid. 



204 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



Contracts relating to the 





1. 

Number 

of 
Contract. 


2. 

WORK. 


3. 

Num- 
ber of 
Bids. 


Amount 


of Bid. 


6. 




4. 

Next to 
Lowest. 


5. 

Lowest. 


Contractor. 


1 


123 » 


Section 106, High-level sewer, 
Wellesley extension, South 
Metropolitan System in 
Needham and Wellesley. 


7 


$37,651 00 


$27,912 502 


Hugh Nawn Contract- 
ing Company, Bos- 
ton. 


2 


1241 


Section 105, High-level sewer, 
Wellesley extension, South 
Metropolitan System in 
Needham. 


7 


37,272 50 


29,655 002 


Hugh Nawn Contract- 
ing Company, Bos- 
ton. 


3 


125 * 


450 tons of coal for Quincy 
pumping station. 


2 


$5.20 per 
ton. 


$4.99 per 
ton. 2 


Frost Coal Company, 
Boston. 


4 


126 * 


2,300 tons of coal for Ward 
Street pumping station. 


2 


$5.05 per 
ton. 


$4.93 per 
ton. 2 


Staples Coal Company, 
Boston. 


5- 


1271 


550 tons of coal for Nut Island 
screen-house. 


1 


- 


$4.75 per 
ton. 2 


Metropolitan Coal 
Company, Boston. 


6 


133 


Section 104, High-level sewer, 
Wellesley extension, South 
Metropolitan System in 
Needham. 


8 


$64,272 50 


$59,055 00 2 


Bay State Dredging 
and Contracting 
Company, Boston. 


7 


1341 


Section 103, High-level sewer, 
Wellesley extension, South 
Metropolitan System in 
Needham. 


12 


35,312 00 


34,011 002 


Bruno and Petitti, 
Boston. 


8 


136 


Two vertical fire tube boilers 
for Ward Street pumping 
station. 


2 


12,300 00 


9,160 002 


D. M. Dillon Steam 
Boiler Works, Fitch- 
burg. 


9 


138 


Section 98, High-level sewer, 
Wellesley extension, South 
Metropolitan System in 
West Roxbury and Dedham. 


3 


79,040 00 


54,630 002 


Thomas Russo & Co., 
Boston. 


10 


141 


2,500 tons of coal for Ward 
Street pumping station. 


1 


- 


$5.63 per 
ton. 2 


Staples Coal Company, 
Boston. 


11 


143 


Section 102, High-level sewer, 
Wellesley extension, South 
Metropolitan System in 
Needham. 


3 


66,293 40 


$62,041 75 2 


Bruno & Petitti, Bos- 
ton. 



Contract completed. 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



205 



South Metropolitan System. 



7. 


8. 


9. 


10. 




Date of Con- 
tract. 


Date of 

Completion 

of Work. 


Prices of Principal Items of Contracts 
made in 1916. 


Value of 

Work done 

Dec. 31, 

1916. 




July 29, 1915 


March 4, 1916 




$35,482 26 


1 


July 29, 1915 


Feb. 19, 1916 


1 . - 


36,955 84 


2 


June 9, 1915 


July 1, 1916 


- 


1,379 55 


3 


June 9, 1915 


July 1, 1916 


- 


10,537 11 


4 


June 10, 1915 


July 1, 1916 


- 


2,024 46 


5 


Dec. 22, 1915 


- 


- . - 


54,644 09 


6 


Dec. 22, 1915 


Dec. 12, 1916 


- 


36,674 97 


7 


May 20, 1916 


- 


Furnish and erect, ready for connection in the boiler 
room, on foundations furnished by the Board, two 
vertical fire tube boilers of 175 H.P. with working 
pressure of 150 lbs. per square inch. 


- 


8 


July 13, 1916 




Work abandoned by the Contractor before any portion 
was completed. Work provided for is now being 
completed in accordance with the specifications by 
Geo. M. Bryne. 


1,094 75 


9 


June 14, 1916 


- 


$5.63 per ton of 2,240 pounds delivered in bins at Ward 
Street pumping station. 


3,416 89 


10 


Oct. 2, 1916 




For earth excavation and refilling in trench and em- 
bankment for 27-in. by 30-in. concrete sewer, $4.25 
per lin. ft.; for Portland cement brick masonry in 
manholes and special structures, $18 per cu. yd.; 
for Portland cement concrete masonry in trench 
and special structures, $8.25 per cu. yd.; for spruce 
piles in trench in place, $0.40 per lin. ft. ; for rock 
excavation in trench, $4 per cu. yd. 


15,513 50 


11 



2 Contract based upon this bid. 



206 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



Contracts made and pending during the Year 1916 — Sewerage Works 

— Concluded. 

Summary of Contracts. 



Value of 

Work done Dec. 

31, 1916. 



North Metropolitan System, 9 contracts, . . 

South Metropolitan System, 11 contracts, 

Total of 20 contracts made and pending during the year 1916, 



$165,104 34 
197,723 42 



$362,827 76 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 207 



Appendix No. 5. 



FINANCIAL STATEMENT PRESENTED TO THE GENERAL COURT 

ON JANUARY 16, 1917. 

The Metropolitan Water and Sewerage Board respectfully pre- 
sents the following abstract of the account of its receipts, expendi- 
tures, disbursements, assets and liabilities for the year ending 
November 30, 1916, together with recommendations for legislation 
which it deems desirable, in accordance with the provisions of chap- 
ter 235 of the Acts of the year 1906. 

Metropolitan Water Works. 
Construction. 
The loans authorized for expenditures under the Metropolitan 
Water acts, the receipts which are added to the loan fund, the ex- 
penditures for the construction and acquisition of works, and the 
balance available on December 1, 1916, have been as follows: — 

Loans authorized under Metropolitan Water acts, . . ' . $42,798,000 00 
Receipt from town of Swampscott for admission to Metropolitan 

Water District, paid into Loan Fund (St. 1909, c. 320), . 90,000 00 

Receipts from the sales of property which are placed to the 
credit of the Metropolitan Water Loan Fund: — 
For the year ending November 30, 1916, . $5,894 43 
For the period prior to December 1, 1915, . 244,703 38 

: 250,597 81 



Amount approved for payment by the Board out of the 
Metropolitan Water Loan Fund: — 
For the year ending November 30, 1916, . $115,913 25 
For the period prior to December 1, 1915, 42,795,989 89 



$43,138,597 81 



42,911,903 14 
Balance December 1, 1916, . . . . . . . $226,694 67 

The amount of the Metropolitan Water Loan bonds issued at the 
end of the fiscal year was $42,602,000, bonds to the amount of 
$66,000 having been issued during the year. Of the total amount 
issued, $41,398,000 were sinking fund bonds, and the remainder, 
amounting to $1,204,000, were issued as serial bonds. 



208 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

At the end of the year the amount of the outstanding bonds was 
$42,530,000, as bonds issued on the serial payment plan to the amount 
of $72,000 had been paid. During the fiscal year $30,000 in serial 
bonds has been paid. 

The Metropolitan Water Loan Sinking Fund amounted on Decem- 
ber 1, 1916, to $13,268,199.36, an increase during the year of 
$776,954.11. 

The net debt on December 1, 1916, was $29,261,800.64, a decrease 
during the fiscal year of $740,954.11. 

Maintenance. 

Amount appropriated for the maintenance and oper- 
ation of works, for the year ending November 30, 
1916, $480,850 00 

Special appropriation for protection of water supply 
in aqueducts (1911) remaining, .... 9,930 60 

Special appropriations for protection and improve- 
ment of the water supply (1912 and 1913) remain- 
ing, . 4,588 31 

Receipts credited to this fund for the year ending 
November 30, 1916, . . . . . . . 46,01106 

$541,379 97 

Amount approved by Board for maintenance and operation of 
works during the year ending November 30, 1916, . . . 457,278 88 



Balance December 1, 1916, $84,101 09 

This balance includes the sum of $9,930.60, the amount remaining 
unexpended of the special appropriation for the protection of the 
water supply in aqueducts, and the sums of $2,713.93, the amount 
remaining unexpended of the special appropriation in 1912, and 
$66.20 of the special appropriation in 1913 and $18,675 of the appro- 
priation in 1916 for the protection and improvement of the water 
supply. 

The Board has also received during the year ending November 30, 
1916, $46,011.06 from rentals, the sale of land, land products and 
power and from other proceeds from the operations of the Board, 
which, according to section 18 of the Metropolitan Water Act, are 
applied by the Treasurer of the Commonwealth to the payment of 
interest on the Metropolitan Water Loan, to sinking fund require- 
ments, and expenses of maintenance and operation of works, in 
reduction of the amount to be assessed upon the Metropolitan Water 
District for the year. 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 209 

Sums received from sales of water to municipalities not belonging 
to the District and to water companies, and from municipalities for 
admission to the District, have been applied as follows: — 

For the period prior to December 1, 1906, distributed to the cities 
and towns of the District, as provided by section 3 of the Met- 
ropolitan Water Act, $219,865 65 

For the period beginning December 1, 1906, and prior to December 
1, 1915, applied to the Metropolitan Water Loan Sinking Fund, 
as provided by chapter 238 of the Acts of 1907, .... 65,644 88 

For the year beginning December 1, 1915, and ending November 
30, 1916, applied to the Metropolitan Water Loan Sinking Fund, 
as provided by said last-named act, 7,021 19 

$292,531 72 
Metropolitan Sewerage Works. 

Construction. 

The loans authorized under the various acts of the Legislature 
for the construction of the Metropolitan Sewerage Works, the re- 
ceipts which are added to the proceeds of the loans, and the expendi- 
tures for construction, are given below, as follows : — 

North Metropolitan System 
Loans authorized for expenditures for construc- 
tion under the various acts, including those for 
the Revere, Belmont and Maiden extensions, 
North System enlargements and extensions, 
New Mystic sewer, Deer Island outfall ex- 
tension, lowering sewer siphon under Maiden 

River, balance of appropriation under chapter ; 

76, Resolves of 1915, and for the Reading 

extension, . $7,512,365 73 

Receipts from sales of real estate and from mis- 
cellaneous sources, which are placed to the 
credit of the North Metropolitan System: — 
For the year ending November 30, 1916, . 132 10 

For the period prior to December 1, 1915, . 85,516 79 
Amount approved for payment by the Board l 
out of the Metropolitan Sewerage Loan Fund, 
North System: — 

For the year ending November 30, 1916, . $124,901 38 

For the period prior to December 1, 1915, . 7,121,633 11 

$7,598,014 62 $7,246,534 49 
Balance December 1, 1916, . $351,480 13 

1 The word " Board " refers to the Metropolitan Sewerage Commission and its successor, the Metro- 
politan Water and Sewerage Board. 



210 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 



South Metropolitan System. 

Loans authorized for expenditures for construc- 
tion under the various acts, applied to the con- 
struction of the Charles River valley sewer, 
Neponset valley sewer, High-level sewer and 
extensions (including Wellesley branch), an 
additional appropriation authorized by chapter 
210, General Acts of 1915, and for additional 
Ward Street station pumping plant, . . . $9,262,046 27 
Receipts for pumping, sales of real estate and 
from miscellaneous sources, which are placed to 
the credit of the South Metropolitan System: — 
For the year ending November 30, 1916, . 37 16 

For the period prior to December 1, 1915, . 19,064 25 
Amount approved by Board for payment as 
follows: — 

On account of the Charles River valley sewer, $800,046 27 

On account of the Neponset valley sewer, . 911,53146 

On account of the High-level sewer and ex- 
tensions : — 
For the year ending November 30, 1916, 172,806 30 

For the period prior to December 1, 1915, 7,211,599 37 



• $9,281,147 68 $9,095,983 40 
Balance December 1, 1916, $185,164 28 

The amount of the Metropolitan Sewerage Loan bonds issued at 
the end of the fiscal year was $16,436,412, bonds to the amount of 
$425,000 having been issued during the year. Of the total amount 
issued, $15,440,912 were sinking fund bonds, and the remainder, 
amounting to $995,500, were serial bonds. 

At the end of the year the amount of the outstanding bonds was 
$16,377,912, as bonds issued on the serial payment plan to the amount 
of $29,500 had been paid during the year, $58,500 having been paid 
to December 1, 1916. 

Of the total amount outstanding at the end of the year, $7,155,000 
was issued for the North Metropolitan System and $9,222,912 for 
the South Metropolitan System. The Metropolitan Sewerage Loan 
Sinking Fund amounted on December 1, 1916, to $3,604,657.27, of 
which $2,284,055.75 was on account of the North Metropolitan 
System and $1,320,601.52 was on account of the South Metro- 
politan System, an increase during the year of $313,677.81. 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 211 

The net debt on December 1, 1916, was $12,773,254.73, an in- 
crease of $81,822.19. 

Included in the above figures for the North Metropolitan System 
is $640,500 in serial bonds, of which $48,500 has been paid, and 
$355,000 for the South Metropolitan System, of which $10,000 has 
been paid. 

Maintenance. 

North Metropolitan System. 

Appropriated for the year ending November 30, 1916, . . . $180,000 00 
Receipts from pumping and from other sources, which are returned 
to the appropriation: — 
For the year ending November 30, 1916, 1,947 73 



$181,947 73 
Amount approved for payment by the Board : — 

For the year ending November 30, 1916, 178,310 72 



Balance December 1, 1916, $3,637 01 

South Metropolitan System. 

Appropriated for the year ending November 30, 1916, . . . $115,000 00 
Receipts from sales of property and for pumping, which are re- 
turned to the appropriation: — 
For the year ending November 30, 1916, 525 57 

$115,525 57 
Amount approved for payment by the Board : ■ — 

For the year ending November 30, 1916, 115,320 12 

Balance December 1, 1916, $205 45 



212 



METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 



Appendix No. 6. 



LEGISLATION OF THE YEAR 1916 AFFECTING THE 
METROPOLITAN WATER AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



Increases in 
salary of 
certain State 
employees 
restricted. 



General Acts, 1916. 

Chapter 2. 

An Act kestkicting inckeases in salary of certain 

state employees. 

Be it enacted, etc., as follows: 

Section 1. Without the consent and approval of the 
governor and council it shall be unlawful for any head of a 
department or other officer of the commonwealth to increase 
the salary of any employee under his direction who is receiv- 
ing an annual salary of one thousand dollars or more, 
notwithstanding any act heretofore passed authorizing such 
an increase. 

Section 2. This act shall take effect upon its passage. 
[Approved February 7, 1916. 



1909, 514, § 113, 
amended. 



State board of 
labor and indus- 
tries to prosecute 
violations of 
law providing 
for weekly pay- 
ment of wages. 



Chapter 14. 

An Act relative to prosecutions under the law 
providing for weekly payment of wages. 

Be it enacted, etc., as follows: 

Section one hundred and thirteen of chapter five hundred 
and fourteen of the acts of the year nineteen hundred and 
nine is hereby amended by striking out the words "The 
chief of the district police or an inspector of factories and 
public buildings", in the first and second lines, and inserting 
in place thereof the words : — The state board of labor and 
industries, — and by striking out the words " thirty days ", 
in the fifth line, and inserting in place thereof the words: — 
three months, — so as to read as follows: — Section 118. 
The state board of labor and industries may make a com- 
plaint against any person for a violation of the provisions of 
the preceding section. Complaints for such violation shall 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 213 

be made within three months after the date thereof, and, on 
the trial, no defence for failure to pay as required, other 
than the attachment of such wages by the trustee process 
or a valid assignment thereof or a valid set-off against the 
same, or the absence of the employee from his regular place 
of labor at the time of payment, or an actual tender to such 
employee at the time of payment of the wages so earned by 
him, shall be valid. The defendant shall not set up as a 
defence a payment of wages after the bringing of the com- 
plaint. An assignment of future wages which are payable 
weekly under the provisions of this act shall not be valid if 
made to the person from whom such wages are to become 
due or to any person on his behalf or if made or procured 
to be made to another person for the purpose of relieving 
the employer from the obligation to pay weekly. The word 
"person" in this section shall include the corporations, con- 
tractors, persons and partnerships described in the preceding 
section. [Approved February 25, 1916. 



Chapter 90. 

An Act to provide for compensating injured em- * 
ployees who are incapacitated for more than 

TEN DAYS. 

Be it enacted, etc., as follows: 

Section 1. Part II of chapter seven hundred and fifty- 1911, 751, Part 
one of the acts of the year nineteen hundred and eleven, amended. " 
and acts in amendment thereof, is hereby amended by 
striking out section four and inserting in place thereof the 
following : — Section J+. No compensation shall be paid Compensation 

ii. P ••i«ii • .for injured 

under this act ior any injury which does not incapacitate employees 

i i P • ir» incapacitated 

the employee tor a period of at least ten days from earning for more than 

« .p . . ten days. 

full wages, but if incapacity extends beyond the period of 
ten days, compensation shall begin on the eleventh day 
after the injury. When compensation shall have begun, it 
shall not be discontinued except with the written assent of 
the employee or the approval of the board, or a member 
thereof: provided, however, that such compensation shall be Proviso, 
paid in accordance with section ten of Part II of said chap- 
ter seven hundred and fifty-one, as amended by section five 
of chapter seven hundred and eight of the acts of the year 
nineteen hundred and fourteen, if the employee in fact 



214 



METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 



Time of taking 
effect. 



earns wages at any time after the original agreement is 
filed. 

Section 2. This act shall take effect on the first day of 
January in the year nineteen hundred and seventeen. 
[Approved March 31, 1916. 



Metropolitan 
water and 
sewerage board 
may install 
pumping engine, 
etc., at Ward 
Street pumping 
station. 

Metropolitan 
Sewerage Loan. 



Certain pro- 
visions of law 
to apply. 



Chapter 93. 

An Act to authokize the metropolitan water and 
sewerage board to make improvements at the 
ward street pumping station in the city of 

BOSTON. 

Be it enacted, etc., as follows: 

Section 1. The metropolitan water and sewerage board 
is hereby authorized to install a pumping engine and two 
boilers and the necessary connections at the Ward street 
pumping station in the city of Boston. 

Section 2. To meet the expenses incurred under the pro- 
visions of this act the treasurer and receiver general shall 
issue from time to time, in the name and behalf of the com- 
monwealth and under its seal, and in addition to the amount 
of such bonds heretofore authorized for the construction of 
the south metropolitan sewerage works, bonds designated 
on the face thereof, Metropolitan Sewerage Loan, to an 
amount not exceeding forty thousand dollars. 

Section 3. The provisions of chapter four hundred and 
twenty-four of the acts of the year eighteen hundred and 
ninety-nine, and of all acts in amendment thereof and in 
addition thereto, shall apply, so far as applicable, to the in- 
debtedness authorized by this act and to all proceedings 
hereunder. 

Section 4. This act shall take effect upon its passage. 
[Approved April 3, 1916. 



Chapter 94. 

An Act to exclude Dudley pond in the town of way- 
land FROM THE METROPOLITAN WATER SYSTEM. 

Be it enacted, etc., as follows: 
in U Wa ey iamf d Section 1. The metropolitan water and sewerage board 

metro^utw? 1 ma ^ c ^ ose an d terminate the existing connection between 
water system. Lake Cochituate and Dudley pond in the town of Wayland, 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 215 

and may transfer and release to said town all interest in 
and control over the waters of said pond. Thereafter Dud- 
ley pond shall not be used as a source of water supply by 
the metropolitan water district or by any city or town, nor 
shall it be allowed to overflow into Lake Cochituate or be 
connected with the water supply of said district or of any 
city or town, and the pond shall be subject to the control 
and regulation of the town of Wayland which is hereby 
authorized to impose penalties for the violation of any 
regulations made by said town in respect to the said pond. 
Section 2. This act shall take effect upon its passage. 
[Approved April 3, 1916. 



Chapter 96. 

An Act to authorize the metropolitan park commis- 
sion TO PROVIDE FOR THE DISPOSAL OF SEWAGE FROM 
THE RIVERSIDE RECREATION GROUNDS. 

Be it enacted, etc., as follows: 

Section 1. The metropolitan park commission is author- Disposal of 

, , p i t» • • i sewage from 

ized to connect the sewerage system ot the .Riverside recrea- the Riverside 
tion grounds, so-called, situated on the westerly side of grounds. 
Charles river in the town of Weston, with the sewerage sys- 
tem of the city of Newton, at such point and upon such 
terms as may be agreed upon by said commission and city. 
All sewage so received may be discharged into the south 
metropolitan sewerage system, provided that the terms 
aforesaid are approved by the metropolitan water and sew- 
erage board, and that such further provisions as the said 
board may deem necessary or proper are complied with. 

Section 2. This act shall take effect upon its passage. 
[Approved April 3, 1916. 



Chapter 100. 

I 

An Act to permit owners of certain land in needham 
to connect the same with the main trunk sewer 
of the south metropolitan sewerage system. 

Be it enacted, etc., as follows: 

Section 1. The metropolitan water and sewerage board Ow ? 1 ? r8 1 of , . 

^ ^ ° certain land in 

may, upon such terms and conditions as said board may Needham may 

" * J connect with 

determine, permit the owners of land in the town of Need- so V* h metr °- 

r t pohtan sew- 

ham, through which passes the main trunk sewer provided erage system. 



216 



METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 



for by chapter three hundred and forty-three of the acts of 
the year nineteen hundred and fourteen, to connect by pri- 
vate drains with said sewer, and thereby to discharge their 
sewage into the south metropolitan sewerage system. The 
said board may also determine whether said owners shall 
pay for said privilege and, if so, the amount and time of 
payment. If payment is required it shall be made to said 
board and applied to the maintenance and operation of the 
south metropolitan sewerage system. Such payment shall 
cease upon the admission of the town of Needham into the 
south metropolitan sewerage district. 

Section 2. This act shall take effect upon its passage. 
[Approved April 4> 1916. 



Town of Read- 
ing added to 
north metro- 
politan sew- 
erage district. 



Outlet to be 
provided at 
Reading town 
line. 



The metropol- 
itan water and 
sewerage board 
to exercise 



Chapter 159. 

An Act to provide for the addition of the town of 
reading to the north metropolitan sewerage 
district. 

Be it enacted, etc., as follows: 

Section 1. The territory comprising the town of Reading 
is hereby added to the north metropolitan sewerage district 
created by chapter four hundred and thirty-nine of the acts 
of the year eighteen hundred and eighty^-nine and acts in 
amendment thereof and in addition thereto. In becoming 
a part of said district, said addition shall be subject to the 
provisions and shall conform to the requirements of the said 
acts, except as is otherwise provided herein. Any authority 
granted to other municipalities by said acts is hereby also 
vested in the town of Reading in common with such other 
municipalities. 

Section 2. The metropolitan water and sewerage board 
shall provide an outlet at the Reading town line in or near 
Brook street for the sewage of said town, and, acting on 
behalf of the commonwealth shall construct a main trunk 
sewer or sewers through such parts of the towns of Wake- 
field and Stoneham and the city of Woburn from the Read- 
ing town line to such point in the north metropolitan 
system as said board may determine to be necessary in order 
to connect with a main trunk sewer in the Mystic valley. 

Section 3. In providing said outlet and in receiving 
sewage from said town, and in any action in relation thereto, 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 217 

and for the purpose of taking, constructing and maintain- ?g rt r ^. n au ~ 
ing such additional main lines of sewers, the metropoli- 
tan water and sewerage board, acting on behalf of the 
commonwealth, shall have and exercise all the authority 
conferred upon it by said chapter four hundred and thirty- 
nine, and by chapter one hundred and sixty-eight of the 
acts of the year nineteen hundred and one and by acts in 
amendment thereof and in addition thereto; and all the 
provisions of said acts are made applicable to the additional 
construction, maintenance and operation hereby authorized 
except as is otherwise provided herein. 

Section 4. To meet the expenses incurred under the Metropolitan 
provisions of this act, the treasurer of the commonwealth 
shall from time to time issue in the name and behalf of the 
commonwealth and under its seal, bonds, designated on the 
face thereof, Metropolitan Sewerage Loan, for a term not 
exceeding forty years, to an amount not exceeding two hun- 
dred and eighty-five thousand dollars in addition to the 
amount of such bonds heretofore authorized for the con- 
struction of the north metropolitan sewerage works. The Certain 
provisions of chapter four hundred and thirty-nine of the Faw^appfy. 
acts of the year eighteen hundred and eighty-nine and chap- 
ter four hundred and twenty-four of the acts of the year 
eighteen hundred and ninety-eight, and all acts in amend- 
ment thereof and in addition thereto shall, so far as they 
are applicable, apply to the indebtedness authorized by this 
act. 

Section 5. The interest and sinking fund requirements interest, etc., 
on account of the moneys expended in constructing that ti°ned?etcy 
part of the sewerage system provided for in this act, and 
the cost of the maintenance and operation thereof, shall be 
deemed to be, and shall be paid as, a part of the interest, 
sinking fund requirements and costs specified in said chap- 
ter four hundred and thirty-nine of the acts of the year 
eighteen hundred and eighty-nine and acts in amendment 
thereof and in addition thereto, and shall be apportioned, 
assessed and collected in the manner provided by that chap- 
ter and acts in amendment thereof and in addition thereto 
except as is otherwise provided herein. The town of 
Reading shall, in addition to the yearly payment of the Share of in- 
assessment above provided for, pay into the treasury of sinking fund 
the commonwealth for the sinking fund of the north metro- to belaid by 
politan sewerage district the sum of thirty-five thousand 



218 



METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 



When 

assessments 
commence. 



Time of taking 
effect. 



dollars, as follows : — one fifth of the said amount shall be 
added to the yearly sum payable by said town on account 
of its share of the interest and sinking fund requirements of 
the district for the succeeding five years. No assessment on 
account of maintenance requirements of the north metropol- 
itan sewerage district shall be made upon said town until 
the calendar year in which its sewers shall be connected 
with the north metropolitan system as herein provided. 

Section 6. This act shall take full effect when accepted 
by vote of a majority of the legal voters of the town of 
Reading present and voting thereon at a meeting called for 
the purpose. [Approved April 26, 1916. 



Metropolitan 
water and 
sewerage board 
may make 
certain im- 
provements in 
metropolitan 
water system. 



Metropolitan 
Water Loan. 



Chapter 172. 

An Act to authorize the metropolitan water and sew- 
erage BOARD TO MAKE CERTAIN IMPROVEMENTS IN THE 
METROPOLITAN WATER SYSTEM. 

Be it enacted, etc., as follows: 

Section 1. The metropolitan water and sewerage board 
is hereby authorized to construct a line for the transmission 
of electricity between the power station at the Wachusett 
Dam in Clinton and the power station at the Sudbury Dam 
in Southborough; to relocate and connect meters for the 
measuring of water supplied through the low service to the 
metropolitan water district; to construct a 12-inch pipe line 
in Poplar street, West Roxbury, and under the Neponset 
river; and to install a new pumping engine at the Arlington 
pumping station. 

Section 2. To meet the expenses incurred under the 
provisions of this act, the treasurer and receiver general 
shall issue from time to time upon the request of said board, 
bonds in the name and behalf of the commonwealth desig- 
nated on the face thereof, Metropolitan Water Loan, Act of 
1916, to an amount not exceeding one hundred and fifty 
thousand dollars, to be taken from the unexpended balance 
of one hundred and ninety-six thousand dollars appropri- 
ated by chapter six hundred and ninety-four of the acts of 
the year nineteen hundred and twelve; and the provisions 
of chapter four hundred and eighty-eight of the acts of the 
year eighteen hundred and ninety-five and acts in amend- 
ment thereof and in addition thereto, shall, so far as appli- 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 219 

cable, apply to the indebtedness and proceedings authorized 
by this act. 

Section 3. This act shall take effect upon its passage. 
[Approved May 3, 1916. 



Chapter 240. 

An Act kelative to the hours of labor of public em- 
ployees AND PERSONS EMPLOYED ON PUBLIC WORKS. 

Be it enacted, etc., as follows: 

Section 1. Section one of chapter four hundred and Amended § *' 
ninety-four of the acts of the year nineteen hundred and 
eleven is hereby amended by inserting after the word 
"day", in the tenth line, the words: — and to forty-eight 
hours in any one week, — and by inserting after the word 
" day ", in the seventeenth line, the words : — or more than 
forty-eight hours in any one week, — so as to read as fol- 
lows: — Section 1. The service of all laborers, workmen and I J our ?,? f labor 

3 of public 

mechanics, now or hereafter employed by the common- employees and 

' x- t/ »/ persons em- 

wealth or by any county therein or by any city or town Pjjgjf 1 ° n * 
which has accepted the provisions of section twenty of feed - 
chapter one hundred and six of the Revised Laws, or of 
section forty-two of chapter five hundred and fourteen of 
the acts of the year nineteen hundred and nine, or by any 
contractor or sub-contractor for or upon any public works 
of the commonwealth or of any county therein or of any 
such city or town, is hereby restricted to eight hours in any 
one calendar day, and to forty-eight hours in any one week, 
and it shall be unlawful for any officer of the commonwealth 
or of any county therein, or of any such city or town, or for 
any such contractor or sub-contractor or other person whose 
duty it shall be to employ, direct or control the service of 
such laborers, workmen or mechanics to require or permit 
any such laborer, workman or mechanic to work more than 
eight hours in any one calendar day, or more than forty- 
eight hours in any one week, except in cases of extraordi- 
nary emergency. Danger to property, life, public safety or ''Extraordinary 
public health only shall be considered cases of extraordinary te?m g defined. 
emergency within the meaning of this section. In cases 
where a Saturday half holiday is given the hours of labor 
upon the other working days of the week may be increased 
sufficiently to make a total of forty-eight hours for the 



220 



METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 



1911, 494, § 4, 
amended. 



Not to apply 
in certain cases. 



Time of taking 
effect. 

Proviso. 



week's work. Threat of loss of employment or to obstruct 
or prevent the obtaining of employment or to refrain from 
employing in the future, shall each be considered to be 
" requiring" within the meaning of this section. Engineers 
shall be regarded as mechanics within the meaning of this act. 

Section 2. Section four of chapter four hundred and 
ninety-four of the acts of the year nineteen hundred and 
eleven is hereby amended by adding at the end thereof the 
following : — nor to persons employed by the trustees of the 
Massachusetts nautical school, on boats maintained by 
the district police for the enforcement of certain laws in the 
waters of the commonwealth, or in connection with the care 
and maintenance of state armories, — so as to read as fol- 
lows : — Section 4- This act shall not apply to the prepa- 
ration, printing, shipment and delivery of ballots to be used 
at a caucus, primary, state, city or town election, nor during 
the sessions of the general court to persons employed in 
legislative printing or binding; nor shall it apply at any 
time to persons employed in any state, county or municipal 
institution, on a farm, or in the care of the grounds, in the 
stable, in the domestic or kitchen and dining room service or 
in store rooms or offices, nor to persons employed by the 
trustees of the Massachusetts nautical school, on boats 
maintained by the district police for the enforcement of cer- 
tain laws in the waters of the commonwealth, or in connec- 
tion with the care and maintenance of state armories. 

Section 3. This act shall take effect on the first day of 
July, nineteen hundred and sixteen: provided, however, that 
the provisions of section one shall not take effect in any 
city until accepted by vote of the city council, approved by 
the mayor, or by vote of the commission in any city under 
a commission form of government, nor in any town until 
accepted by the voters thereof at an annual meeting or at 
a special meeting called for the purpose. [Approved May 20, 
1916. 



Chapter 251. 

An Act kelative to the discharge and substitution of 

bonds given to the commonwealth. 
Be it enacted, etc., as follows: 
Discharge and Section 1. Bonds or other security given to the com- 

substitution of " ° 

bonds given to monwealth to secure the performance of contracts for the 

the common- * 

wealth. construction or repair of public buildings or other public 



No. 57.] ^AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 221 

works, or given in accordance with section seventy-seven of 
chapter six of the Revised Laws, may be discharged or re- 
leased by the governor, with the advice and consent of the 
council, upon such terms as may be deemed expedient, 
after the expiration of sixty-five days from the time of the 
completion of the work contracted to be done: provided. Proviso, 
that no claim filed under the provisions of section seventy- 
seven of chapter six of the Revised Laws is pending; and 
new bonds or other security in substitution therefor may be 
taken by the governor, with like advice and consent. 

Section 2. This act shall take effect upon its passage. 
[Approved May 24, 1916. 



Chapter 258. 

An Act relative to a half holiday for laborers and 
mechanics of the metropolitan water and sewer- 
age board and the metropolitan park commission. 

Be it enacted, etc.; as follows: 

Section one of chapter five hundred and twenty-eight of 1912 » 528, si, 

. iiiii etc '» amen ded. 

the acts of the year nineteen hundred and twelve, as 

amended by chapter four hundred and fifty-five of the acts 

of the year nineteen hundred and fourteen, is hereby further 

amended by striking out the word "permanent", in the first 

and thirteenth lines, respectively; and also by striking out 

the words " during the months of April, May, June, July, 

August and September", in the seventh and eighth lines, 

so as to read as follows: — Section 1. Laborers and me- Half holidays 

chanics in the service of the metropolitan water and sewer- e tc.,Vmet- 

ii ,i , !•■ i ♦ , ropolitan water 

age board or the metropolitan park commission, except and sewerage 
those employed in the pumping stations of the metropolitan metropolitan 
water and sewerage board and at the bath houses under the mission 01 " 
control of the metropolitan park commission," shall be given 
a half holiday each week without loss of pay, and, if prac- 
ticable, the half holiday shall be on Saturday. If, how- 
ever, the public service so requires, the metropolitan park 
commission and the metropolitan water and sewerage board 
may at any time during the year give to the laborers and 
mechanics in their service, in lieu of the said half holidays, 
days off duty without loss of pay equivalent in time to the 
half holidays which would otherwise be given under this 
act. [Approved May 24, 1916. 



222 



METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 



North metro- 
politan sew- 
erage system, 
maintenance. 



Special Acts, 1916. 

Chapter 167. 

An Act making an appropriation for the maintenance 
and operation of the north metropolitan sewer- 
age system. 

Be it enacted, etc., as follows: 

Section 1. A sum not exceeding one hundred and eighty 
thousand dollars is hereby appropriated, to be paid out of 
the North Metropolitan Sewerage System Maintenance 
Fund, for the maintenance and operation of a system of 
sewage disposal for the cities included in what is known as 
the north metropolitan sewerage system, during the fiscal 
year ending on the thirtieth day of November, nineteen 
hundred and sixteen. 

Section 2. This act shall take effect upon its passage. 
[Approved March 8, 1916. 



South metro- 
politan sew- 
erage system, 
maintenance. 



Chapter 168. 

An Act making an appropriation for the maintenance 
and operation of the south metropolitan sewer- 
age system. 

Be it enacted, etc., as follows: 

Section 1. A sum not exceeding one hundred and fif- 
teen thousand dollars is hereby appropriated, to be paid out 
of the South Metropolitan Sewerage System Maintenance 
Fund, for the cost of maintenance and operation of the 
south metropolitan sewerage system, comprising a part of 
Boston, the cities of Newton and Waltham and the towns 
of Brookline, Watertown, Dedham and Milton, during the 
fiscal year ending on the thirtieth day of November, nine- 
teen hundred and sixteen. 

Section 2. This act shall take effect upon its passage. 
[Ajjproved March 8, 1916. 



Xo. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 223 

Chapter 198. 

An Act making an appropriation for the maintenance 
and operation of the metropolitan water system. 

Be it enacted, etc., as follows: 

Section 1. A sum not exceeding four hundred eighty Metropolitan 
thousand eight hundred and fifty dollars is hereby appro- maintenance.' 
priated, to be paid out of the Metropolitan Water Main- 
tenance Fund, for the maintenance and operation of the 
metropolitan water system for the cities and towns in what 
is known as the metropolitan water district, during the 
fiscal year ending on the thirtieth day of November, nine- 
teen hundred and sixteen: provided, that of the said sum Proviso. 
twenty thousand dollars shall be reserved for the protection 
and improvement of water supplies by the purchase of land 
or otherwise. 

Section 2. This act shall take effect upon its passage. 
[Approved March 21, 1916. 



224 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



INDEX TO LEGISLATION OF THE YEAR 1916 AFFECTING THE 
METROPOLITAN WATER AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



A. 

APPROPRIATIONS. 

for admission of Reading to North Metropolitan Sewerage District, 
for certain improvements in Metropolitan Water System, 
for improvements at Ward Street pumping station, 
. for maintenance of Metropolitan Water System, . . 

for maintenance of North Metropolitan Sewerage System, 
for maintenance of South Metropolitan Sewerage System, 



Chap. Sect. 



, G. 159 


4 


. G. 172 


2 


. G. 93 


2 


. S. 198 


1 


. S. 167 


, 1 


. S. 168 


1 



B. 
BONDS. 

relative to discharge and substitution of, given to Commonwealth, G. 251 1 



D. 
DUDLEY POND. 

to be excluded from Metropolitan Water System, 



G. 94 



E. 
EMPLOYEES, STATE. 

relative to half holiday for certain, . . . . . . . G. 258 - 

relative to hours of labor for certain, . . . . . . G. 240 1, 2 

restricting increases in salary of certain, . . . . . G. 2 1 



M. 

METROPOLITAN WATER AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 

to install additions to pumping plant at Ward Street station, 
to make certain improvements in Metropolitan Water System. 
METROPOLITAN WATER SYSTEM. 

appropriation for maintenance of, .... . 



G. 93 
G. 172 



S. 198 



' N. 
NEEDHAM. 

owners of certain land in, to connect with South Metropolitan Sew- 
erage System, ......... G. 100 

NORTH METROPOLITAN SEWERAGE SYSTEM. 

addition of Reading to, ........ G. 159 

appropriation for maintenance of, ...... S. 167 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 225 



R. 

Chap. Sect. 
READING. 

addition of town of, to North Metropolitan Sewerage District, . G. 159 1 

RIVERSIDE RECREATION GROUNDS. 

relative to disposal of sewage from, . . . . . . G. 96 1 



SOUTH METROPOLITAN SEWERAGE SYSTEM. 

appropriation for maintenance of, . . . . . S. 168 



W. 
WAGES. 

weekly payment of, to public employees, prosecutions under law, G. 14 - 
WORKMEN'S COMPENSATION ACT. 

compensation of injured employees incapacitated more than ten 

days, .•■-.-. . G. 90 1